Cd 38 chapter 6 pp.ppt sept 2016

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Text of Cd 38 chapter 6 pp.ppt sept 2016

  • Chapter 6: Creating Quality Learning EnvironmentsPlanning and Administering Early Childhood ProgramsTenth EditionNancy FreemanCelia A. DeckerJohn R. Decker

    Prepared by:Nancy K. FreemanTere HolmesKris Curtis

    Adapted by: Katy Kelley

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    Freeman/Decker/Decker, Planning and Administering Early Childhood Programs, 10e 2012, 2008, 2005, 2001, 1995 by Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

    Opening ReflectionWhat kind of environments (i.e., physical settings) make you feel comfortable and at ease? What kind of environments/settings do you find unpleasant and can even put you in a bad mood?

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    Freeman/Decker/Decker, Planning and Administering Early Childhood Programs, 10e 2012, 2008, 2005, 2001, 1995 by Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

    6-*When planning a new or renovated facility . . .Determine how much indoor and outdoor space you will needFollow all building codes and zoning regulationsKeep the safety of children and staff as your primary concernPlan to accommodate children and staff with disabilities Make the facility child-oriented and comfortable for adults

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    Freeman/Decker/Decker, Planning and Administering Early Childhood Programs, 10e 2012, 2008, 2005, 2001, 1995 by Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

    6-*When planning a facility (continued)Make indoor and outdoor spaces flexible to accommodate changing interestsPlan spaces intentionally Create a least restrictive environment that welcomes children with special needs Select furniture, equipment, and materials with carePlan expenditures carefully

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    Freeman/Decker/Decker, Planning and Administering Early Childhood Programs, 10e 2012, 2008, 2005, 2001, 1995 by Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

    6-*Explore energy-saving featuresSolar heatHigh-efficiency heating and coolingEnergy-saving appliancesConsider Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design (LEED) Certification

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    Freeman/Decker/Decker, Planning and Administering Early Childhood Programs, 10e 2012, 2008, 2005, 2001, 1995 by Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

    6-*Programs that share facilities should clarify . . .Where will materials be stored? Who has access to them? How are bulletin boards, cubbies, classroom decorations shared? Who is responsible for cleaning what?

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    Freeman/Decker/Decker, Planning and Administering Early Childhood Programs, 10e 2012, 2008, 2005, 2001, 1995 by Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

    6-*When programs lease facilities . . .Is a long term lease available? Can it be renewed?

    Who is responsible for repairs?

    Can the building and grounds be altered by adding ramps, painting walls, installing playgrounds?

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    Freeman/Decker/Decker, Planning and Administering Early Childhood Programs, 10e 2012, 2008, 2005, 2001, 1995 by Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

    6-*Entry/Exit areaFamilies first and last image every dayCreates an impression in the neighborhoodShould not be too large or institutionalPlantings, lighting, and natural materials invite children and families to enterWindows smooth childrens transitionsDisplays of childrens work, families, activities help welcome visitors

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    Freeman/Decker/Decker, Planning and Administering Early Childhood Programs, 10e 2012, 2008, 2005, 2001, 1995 by Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

    6-*When selecting colors for indoor spaces consider:The amount of light in the roomThe size and shape of the roomTake care to avoid an over stimulating environment limit decorations and reduce clutterConsider research on the psychological effects of color and its impact

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    Freeman/Decker/Decker, Planning and Administering Early Childhood Programs, 10e 2012, 2008, 2005, 2001, 1995 by Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

    6-*Commonly used floor coveringsCarpetSofter and more comfortableAbsorbs noise wellEssential in infant roomsResilient flooring (vinyl & linoleum) Should have a non-slip surfaceEasily cleanedGood for messy play and eating areas

    Most programs create activity zones by combining floor surfacing.

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    Freeman/Decker/Decker, Planning and Administering Early Childhood Programs, 10e 2012, 2008, 2005, 2001, 1995 by Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

    6-*Storage: There is never enough!10% of the centers square footage should be for storage Plan for the storage of:Childrens belongingsIndoor and outdoor equipment and toysBulk supplies (art materials, paper goods, etc.)Curriculum materialsAdministrative records and materialsFood service and custodial supplies

    Adequate storage contributes to a rich curriculum.

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    Freeman/Decker/Decker, Planning and Administering Early Childhood Programs, 10e 2012, 2008, 2005, 2001, 1995 by Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

    6-*Room arrangementsShould help the program meet its goalsShould be open and invitingShould provide areas that feel privateShould consider the needs of children with disabilities

    Freeman/Decker/Decker, Planning and Administering Early Childhood Programs, 10e 2012, 2008, 2005, 2001, 1995 by Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

    Video Clip-Early Childhood Environments 6-*

    Freeman/Decker/Decker, Planning and Administering Early Childhood Programs, 10e 2012, 2008, 2005, 2001, 1995 by Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

    Small Group/Pairs Discussion Based on what you learned from this video-clip (along with your own experience), how can you use the classroom design (i.e., using texture, color, furniture, etc.) to support childrens developmental growth?Did you learn any new approaches that you might want to implement?

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    Freeman/Decker/Decker, Planning and Administering Early Childhood Programs, 10e 2012, 2008, 2005, 2001, 1995 by Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

    6-*Furniture and Equipment Include comfortable child-sized and adult-sized seating Include appropriately proportioned tables and chairs for childrenInclude open shelves that give children choicesBe flexible and open-ended Be durable, practical, and attractive

    Freeman/Decker/Decker, Planning and Administering Early Childhood Programs, 10e 2012, 2008, 2005, 2001, 1995 by Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

    6-*Learning/activity centers should offer these kinds of experiences every day:Quiet activities such as listening to booksStructured activities such as puzzlesCraft and discovery activities such as paint, play dough, water, and sandDramatic play activities such as dress-upLarge motor activities such as climbing and sliding

    Freeman/Decker/Decker, Planning and Administering Early Childhood Programs, 10e 2012, 2008, 2005, 2001, 1995 by Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

    The Creative Curriculum Learning Environment Video Clip6-*

    Freeman/Decker/Decker, Planning and Administering Early Childhood Programs, 10e 2012, 2008, 2005, 2001, 1995 by Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

    Group Discussion Based on The Creative Curriculum approach, what strategies did you find effective?Were there any approaches you didnt like?

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    Freeman/Decker/Decker, Planning and Administering Early Childhood Programs, 10e 2012, 2008, 2005, 2001, 1995 by Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

    6-*Each learning center should:Be in a specific location well suited for the activityHave clearly marked boundariesProvide areas for play and for observingProvide for storage and display of related materialsCreate a mood that sets it apart from other areas in the classroom

    Freeman/Decker/Decker, Planning and Administering Early Childhood Programs, 10e 2012, 2008, 2005, 2001, 1995 by Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

    6-*Infant/toddler environments:Must keep children safe and healthy

    Should be aesthetically pleasing with beautiful colors, sounds, textures, etc.

    Should be baby scale and adult scale

    Should have open ended materials and duplicates of popular toys

    Freeman/Decker/Decker, Planning and Administering Early Childhood Programs, 10e 2012, 2008, 2005, 2001, 1995 by Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

    6-*Infant/toddler environments: (continued)Should provide children opportunities to be alone

    Should include small activity areas for one or two children

    Should be predictable and familiar, but also novel

    Freeman/Decker/Decker, Planning and Administering Early Childhood Programs, 10e 2012, 2008, 2005, 2001, 1995 by Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

    6-*Activity centers for preschool and primary-age childrenBlocks Dramatic playArt Music for listening to & making music and for dancing/marching etc. Water and sand Woodworking and carpentryScience and mathematics Manipulatives and small construction toysLanguage, literacy, writing, and books

    Freeman/Decker/Decker, Planning and Administering Early Childhood Programs, 10e 2012, 2008, 2005, 2001, 1995 by Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

    6-*Activity centers for school-age careCooking and snacksQuiet space for reading, homework, listening to music, creative writing, restingArts and crafts, woodworking if possible Table games and manipulatives Computer center with Internet accessOther areas based on childrens interests

    Freeman/Decker/Decker, Planning and Administering Early Childhood Programs, 10e 2012, 2008, 2005, 2001, 1995 by Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

    6-*Plan for these adult/private areasFamily reception areaAdult lounge/rest roomsStaff workroomProfessional libraryOffice and administrative areaIsolation area for children who are ill

    Freeman/Decker/Decker, Planning and Administering Early Childhood Programs, 10e 2012, 2008, 2005, 2001, 1995 by P