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Spelling / Phonics Scheme Rationale · PDF file phonics at speed and revise phonics again as they introduce new graphemes and spelling patterns as outlined in the NC 2014. They will

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    Spelling / Phonics Scheme

    Rationale

    Writing down ideas fluently is a complex process. It relies on effective transcription; that is fluent handwriting and

    quick, accurate spelling. The more competent and confident children are with spelling the easier composition

    becomes. They have one less thing to worry about when writing. The spelling structures of English are complex and

    fascinating and children have a right to understand how their language works through: knowing our alphabetic code

    (phonics); understanding word structures (morphology); understanding spelling structures (orthography) and where

    our language came from (etymology). Good spelling is important: employers look for it; the use of dictionaries and

    thesauruses becomes easier; vocabulary develops through a fascination with words and finally children are assessed

    at the end of key stage one and two and spelling is part of this assessment. We want test scores to reflect children’s

    true ability and not be limited by under-achievement in spelling.

    However, it is worth noting than for a very small group of children spelling will always be a challenge. For these

    children, as with all children, it should be made known spelling is difficult because of our language system. This

    group of children should be given additional support to help them develop: confidence, a good bank of high

    frequency words and understanding of our alphabetic code. This will allow them to become confident writers even

    if challenged with spelling.

    There is an intrinsic link between reading, writing and spelling. For most of us the more we write and read the better

    our spelling becomes. This is because, for most of us, remembering how to spell a word is visual. We only use

    phonics when challenged with a new or difficult word. Phonics will get us a long way but not all the way. We then

    turn to spell checkers and dictionaries. These should be available for young people and they should be taught how

    to use them. If children are struggling with spelling ensure that they are reading and writing enough.

    How we teach spelling

    Reception

     Daily systematic synthetic phonics.

     Continuous revision and review of previously taught phonics.

     Additional sessions to teach high frequency tricky words which are not phonically decodable.

     Continuous revision and review of high frequency tricky words.

     Having clear non-negotiable lists of words which must be spelt correctly according to the age of the children.

     Having high expectations.

     Modelling correct speech and pronunciation.

     An aim that almost all children will achieve age appropriate expectations.

     Teaching that takes into account a range of learning styles.

     Providing time for children to learn spellings in sessions.

    Key stage one

     Daily systematic synthetic phonics.

     Continuous revision and review of previously taught phonics.

     Additional lesson to teach high frequency tricky words which are not phonically decodable.

     Continuous revision and review of high frequency tricky words.

     Having clear non-negotiable lists of words which must be spelt correctly according to the age of the children.

     Having high expectations.

     Modelling correct speech and pronunciation.

     Creating a passion for words and the complexities of our language.

     An aim that almost all children will achieve age appropriate expectations.

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     Teaching that takes into account a range of learning styles.

     Providing time for children to learn spellings in sessions.

     Assessment which uses dictation to help the children use the words in context.

     By end of Year 1, children should have completed Phase 5.

    Key stage two

     Daily spelling activities with an assessment lesson on Friday.

     Continuous revision and review of previously taught phonics to support the spelling of new words.

     A programme which covers Y3/4 and Y5/6 objectives and word lists twice to allow revision and

    consolidation.

     Having high expectations.

     Correcting speech and pronunciation.

     Creating a passion for words and the complexities of our language.

     An aim that almost all children will achieve age appropriate expectations.

     Teaching that takes into account a range of learning styles. Providing time for children to learn spellings in

    lessons.

     Assessment which uses dictation to help the children use the words in context.

    Planning

    In reception the school phonics programme is used to plan daily phonic sessions and which also cover the

    appropriate ‘tricky’ or ‘common exception’ words.

    In key stage one year one the school phonics programme is used to plan daily phonic sessions which also cover the

    appropriate ‘tricky’ or ‘common exception’ words. Teachers must ensure the programme is in line with the demands

    of NC 2014. In addition teachers must ensure the objectives in the NC not covered in the phonics programme are

    addressed by the end of the year (e.g. plurals, endings: ing, ed, er, est and the prefix un).

    In key stage one year two it is anticipated that, as most children will be on track, teachers will plan to revise known

    phonics at speed and revise phonics again as they introduce new graphemes and spelling patterns as outlined in the

    NC 2014. They will plan daily phonic/spelling sessions per week. Children who do not meet the required standard in

    Year 1 phonics screening check should continue to access phonic sessions to ensure they catch up with their peers.

    In key stage two the school spelling programme in conjunction with NC 2014 is used and teachers deliver daily

    spelling activities each week. The first lesson introduces the words and rule/pattern/convention, if there is one, and

    the meaning of the words is established. The next three sessions will be shorter and the children will be actively and

    interactively involved in learning the spellings, investigating the rule/pattern/convention and adding words they

    have found to a class list. The final lesson will assess the key words for the week through dictation of short

    sentences.

    Differentiation

    With quality first teaching, children should make expected progress. Those children falling behind will be given

    additional support. The aim is to, wherever possible, include the children in the current age appropriate learning to

    prevent them from falling behind. In the earliest stages of phonics learning children will be grouped by stage not

    age. However, the aim is to accelerate to age appropriate as soon as possible.

    Programme and Resources The school phonics programme, the school spelling programme and The National

    Curriculum 2014 should be used as teachers plan. Support for Spelling and Spelling Bank should be used as a

    resource for ideas and explanations.

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    EYFS and Key Stage One Programme of Work for Spelling and Vocabulary

    In EYFS and KS1 the children will follow a daily phonics programme using Letters and Sounds. The national curriculum spelling, punctuation and

    grammar content will be taught as part of phonics as well as being incorporated into English lessons and the aspects will be taught to meet the

    needs of the child.

    The children will be introduced to ten spellings every week from the National curriculum spelling lists. These spellings, their meanings and

    spelling patterns will be explored in school and children are expected to also practise these at home. Each week the children will also practise

    spellings which use the phonic sounds they are currently learning in class.

    In EYFS and KS1 children also have non-negotiable spellings.

    They fall into the following three groups:

    1. Tricky words e.g. said

    2. Tricky for now e.g. the associated phonics hasn’t yet been taught

    3. Phonically regular e.g. but

    Before children are expected to spell them correctly they need to be taught them and given time to learn through constant revision and

    application.

    The National Curriculum 2014, Letters and Sounds and HFW lists have been used to compile these lists.

    To support fluent reading children need to be able to read these words first.

    Reception

    Tricky words Phonically regular Other common words.

    the you to a back has yes own name

    to they no an and will pull

    i are into am get that full

    no my like at big this push

    go her said if him then good

    we his was in not them

    into has going it got with

    he saw my off up see

    she all day on mam for

    me is play can mum went

    be of dad but look

    was as had put too

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    Year 1

    Tricky words Phonically regular Other common words.

    have school very away make Days of the week

    so your don’t from here Numbers to twenty

    do want house it’s home Common colour names

    some all old just tree

    come tall I’m help again

    were small oh says first

    there call by ask girl

    littl