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Photosynthesis and Cellular Respiration

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Photosynthesis and Cellular Respiration. Energy for Life. Complementary processes. Photosynthesis is an important part of the carbon cycle. The processes of photosynthesis and cellular respiration are complementary processes, meaning they work together to benefit living organisms. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Text of Photosynthesis and Cellular Respiration

  • Photosynthesis and Cellular Respiration

    Energy for Life

  • Complementary processes

    Photosynthesis is an important part of the carbon cycle.The processes of photosynthesis and cellular respiration are complementary processes, meaning they work together to benefit living organisms.
  • Plants and animals contribute

    Autotrophs, such as plants, produce glucose using the carbon in carbon dioxide.Both autotrophs and heterotrophs, such as grasshoppers that eat plants, use those carbohydrates in cellular respiration. Respiration, in turn, produces carbon dioxide.
  • Photosynthesis equation

    light

    6 CO2 + 6 H2O C6H12O6 + 6O2

    Photosynthesis combines water, carbon dioxide and sunlight to produce glucose and oxygen, converting light energy into chemical energy.
  • Respiration equation

    6O2 + C6H12O6 6CO2 + H2O + Energy

    Respiration breaks down glucose and other food molecules in the presence of oxygen.
  • Energy renewal

    Energy captured from sunlight by photosynthetic organisms is used and released in the cellular respiration of living things.The energy that living things use, must continually be renewed through photosynthesis.
  • Where does photosynthesis occur?

    In plants and other photosynthetic eukaryotes, photosynthesis takes place inside chloroplasts. The chloroplasts contain saclike membranes called thylakoids.Thylakoids are arranged in stacks known as grana.
  • Photosystems

    Proteins in the thylakoid organize chlorophyll and other pigments into light-collecting units called photosystems.
  • What are the reactions of photosynthesis?

    Scientists divide the reactions of photosystems into two parts: Light-dependent reactions and light-independent reactions or the Calvin cycle.The light-dependent reactions take place within the thylakoid membranes.They use energy from light to produce ATP and NADPH, which are energy carriers.
  • Light-dependent reactions

    Photosystem II absorbs light and breaks water molecules into energized electrons, hydrogen ions (H+) and oxygen.High-energy electrons move through the electron transport chain from photosystem II to photosystem I.As electrons pass from chlorophyll to NADP+, more hydrogen ions are pumped across the membrane.ATP synthase in the membrane allows H+ ions to pass through it. The enzyme binds ADP and a phosphate group to produce ATP.
  • Light-dependent reactions

  • Light-dependent reactions

  • Light-independent reactions

    The light-independent reactions of the Calvin Cycle take place in the stroma outside of the thylakoid membranes.The Calvin Cycle uses ATP and NADPH from the light-dependent reactions to produce high-energy sugars.
  • Light-independent reactions

  • What is the visible spectrum of light and why is it important?

    The visible spectrum of light is the set of varying wavelengths of light that are visible to our eyes as different colors. Sunlight is a mixture of different wavelengths of light, even though it appears as white light to your eyes.
  • The visible spectrum

  • Pigments absorb light

    In addition to water and carbon dioxide, photosynthesis requires light and chlorophyll, a pigment molecule within chloroplasts.The two main types are chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b.Chlorophyll absorbs blue-violet and red light very well. Green light is reflected by plant leaves, which is what gives them their green color.
  • Light absorption powers photosynthesis

    Chlorophyll absorbs blue-violet and red light very well. Green light is reflected by plant leaves, which is what gives them their green color.The high-energy electrons produced when chlorophyll absorbs light make photosynthesis work.
  • Photosynthesis Review

  • Photosynthesis Review

  • Photosynthesis Review

  • Cellular Respiration

  • Living things need energy

    Our bodies have a lot of work to do every dayMoving muscles,Building essential molecules, and Transporting substances across cell membranes.
  • Where do we get energy?

    Food provides the energy living things need to grow and reproduce.Food is the source of the material our cells use to build new molecules.
  • How much energy is present in food?

    Quite a lot!One gram of the sugar glucose (C6H12O6) when burned in the presence of oxygen, releases 3,811 calories of heat energy. A calorie is the amount of energy needed to raise the temperature of 1 gram of water 1 degree Celsius.
  • What is cellular respiration?

    Cellular respiration is the process that releases energy by breaking down glucose and other food molecules in the presence of oxygen.

    6O2 + C6H12O6

    6CO2 + 6H2O + Energy

    oxygen + glucose

    carbon dioxide + water + energy

  • Where does cellular respiration
    take place?

    The beginning pathway of cellular respiration, glycolysis, takes place in the cell cytoplasm.The two remaining pathwaysthe Krebs Cycle and electron transporttake place inside the mitochondria of the cell.
  • Cellular Respiration Overview

    Glycolysis: a glucose molecule is split to produce two molecules of pyruvic acid.Krebs Cycle: pyruvic acid is used to produce carbon dioxide, NADH, ATP and FADH2. Sometimes called the citric acid cycle because citric acid is first formed.Electron Transport Chain: uses high-energy electrons from the Krebs Cycle to convert ADP to ATP.
  • Glycolysis

  • Kreb Cycle

  • ATP

    NETS: 3NADH, 1ATP, 1FADH2, & 2CO2

    Kreb Cycle

    *

    7.unknown
  • What happens if oxygen
    is not available?

    Glycolysis is then followed by a different pathway.The combined process of this pathway and glycolysis is called fermentation.Fermentation releases energy from food molecules by producing ATP in the absence of oxygen.
  • Fermentation

  • Cellular Respiration Summary