PERCEPTUAL INTELLIGENCE

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Text of PERCEPTUAL INTELLIGENCE

PERCEPTUAL INTELLIGENCESEMINAR REPORT submitted by AMITH K P EPAHECS009 for the award of the degree of

Bachelor of Technology

DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING GOVERNMENT ENGINEERING COLLEGE SREEKRISHNAPURAM PALAKKAD September 2010

CERTIFICATE

This is to certify that the seminar report entitled PERCEPTUAL INTELLIGENCE submitted by AMITH K P, to the Department Of Computer Science and Engineering, Government Engineering College, Sreekrishnapuram, Palakkad-678633, in partial fullment of the requirement for the award of B.Tech Degree in Computer Science and Engineering is a bonade record of the work carried out by him during year 2010.

Dr P C Reghu Raj Seminar Co-ordinator

Dr P C Reghu Raj Head of the Department

Place: Date:

Sreekrishnapuram 24-10-2010

AcknowledgementIt stands to reason that the completion of a seminar of this scope needs the support of many people. I take this opportunity to express my boundless thanks and commitment to each and every one,who helped me in successful completion of my seminar. I am so happy to acknowledge the help of all the individuals to full my attempt. First and foremost I wish to express wholehearted indebtedness to God Almighty for his gracious constant care and magnanimity showered blissfully over me during this endeavour. I thank to Dr P C Reghu Raj, Head of Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Govt. Engineering College Sreekrishnapuram, for providing and availing me all the required facilities for undertaking the seminar in a systematic way .I express my heartfelt gratitude to him for working as a seminar coordinator and guide ,who corrected me and gave valuable suggestions. Gratitude is extended to all teaching and non teaching stas of Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Govt Engineering College Sreekrishnapuram for the sincere directions imparted and the cooperation in connection with the seminar. I am also thankful to my parents for the support given in connection with the seminar. Gratitude may be extended to all well-wishers and my friends who supported us to complete the seminar in time.

ii

Table of ContentsList of Figures Abstract 1 Introduction 1.1 1.2 1.3 Motivation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Why Perceptual Intelligence ? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Organisation of the Report. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v 1 2 2 3 3 4 4 4 6 7 7 10 12 16 17 17 17 18 21

2 Perceptual Intelligence 2.1 Perception . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.1.1 2.2 Filters Of Perception . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Perceptual User Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.2.1 Information ow in Perceptual User Interfaces . . . . . . . . . 2.2.1.1 2.2.1.2 2.2.1.3 Perceptive User Interface/Perceptual Interface . . .

Multimodal Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Multimedia Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2.3 2.4

Perceptual Intelligence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Perceptual Intelligent Systems 2.4.1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Gesture Recognition System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4.1.1 2.4.1.2 2.4.1.3 Gesture Recognition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Working . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Challenges of Gesture Recognition . . . . . . . . . .

2.4.2

Speech Recognition System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4.2.1 2.4.2.2 2.4.2.3 Basic Needs Of Speech Recognition . . . . . . . . . . Working . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Performance of speech recognition systems . . . . . .

21 21 23 25 25 26 26 27 31 31 33 35

2.4.3

Nouse Perceptual Vision Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4.3.1 2.4.3.2 2.4.3.3 Computer Controlled Actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tools Used In Nouse Perceptual Vision Interface . . Working Of Nouse Perceptual Vision Interface . . . .

3 Applications 3.1 3.2 SMART ROOMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SMART CLOTHES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4 Conclusion

Bibliography

36

iv

List of Figures2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.7 2.8 Perception . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 7 8 9 9 12 13

Perceptual User Interface

Information ow in Perceptual User Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Human Computer Interaction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Perceptual Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Phantom input/output device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dierent Medias . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

User adjusts sound volume with slider and turns o sound with Sound o push button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 19 20 30 32

2.9

Background subtracted mask . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2.10 image illustrating body center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.11 Selecting Shift, selecting H . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.1 smart room . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

AbstractHuman computer interaction has not changed fundamentally for nearly two decades. Most users interact with computers by typing, clicking and pointing. Now most of the research works are concentrating on interaction techniques that combine an understanding of natural human capabilities with computer I/O devices and machine perception and reasoning. Perceptual Intelligence is the knowledge and understanding that everything we experience (especially thoughts and feelings) are dened by our perception. Its important to realize that this is an active, not passive, process and therefore we have the ability to control it or change it. Computers need to share our perceptual environment before they can be really helpful. They need to be situated in the same world that we are; they need to know much more than just the text of our words. They also need to know who we are, see our expressions and gestures, and hear the tone and emphasis of our voice.

CHAPTER 1 IntroductionInanimate things are coming to our life. That is the simple objects that surround us are gaining sensors,computational powers, and actuators.Consequently,desks and doors, TVs and telephones, cars and trains,eyeglasses and shoes, and even the shirts on our backs are changing from static, inanimate objects into adaptive, reactive systems that can be more friendly, useful, and ecient. Or, of course,these new systems could be even more dicult to use than current systems;it depends how we design the interface between the world of humans and the world of this new generation of machines.

1.1

Motivation The main problem with todays systems are,they are both deaf and blind.They

mostly experience the world around them through a slow serial line to a keyboard and mouse. Even multimedia computers, which can handle signals like sound and image,do so only as a transport device that knows nothing. Hence these objects are still static and inanimate. To change inanimate objects like oces,houses, cars, or glasses into smart, active help-mates,they need some kind of Intelligence.This kind of intelligence what they need here is Perceptual Intelligence. Perceptual Intelligence is paying attention to people and the surrounding situation in the same way another person would, thus allowing these new devices to learn to adapt their behavior to suit us,rather than adapting to them as we do today.

1.2

Why Perceptual Intelligence ? The problem with current computers is they are incredibly isolated. If

you imagine yourself living in a closed, dark, soundproof box with only a telegraph connection to the outside world, you can get some sense of how dicult it is for computers to act intelligently or be helpful.They exist in a world almost completely disconnected from ours, so how can they know what they should do in order to be helpful? Computers need to share our perceptual environment before they can be really helpful.They need to be situated in the same world that we are; they need to know much more than just the text of our words of the signals content.Once the computer has the perceptual ability to know who, what, when, where, and why, by understanding,learning and interacting with the physical world sucent for the computer to determine a good course of action.If the systems have the ability to learn perception, they can act in a smart way.Perceptual intelligence is actually a learned skill.

1.3

Organisation of the Report.

Each chapter begins with a brief introduction to its content. Chapter 2 describes the Perceptual Intelligence in detail. Chapter 3 discusses the Applications of Perceptual Intelligence. Chapter 4 includes the conclusion.

3

CHAPTER 2 Perceptual Intelligence2.1 Perception Perception is the process of receiving information about and making sense of the world around us. It involves deciding which information to notice, how to categorize this information and how to interpret it within the framework of existing knowledge.A process by which individuals organize and interpret their sensory impressions in order to give meaning to their environment.For instance ,as shown in Fig 2.1,in perception ,process rstly recieve stimuli and select them accordingly.Now after selecting,it organises and interprets proceeding to give response. Perception is the end result of a thought that begins its journey with the senses. We see, hear, physically feel, smell or taste an event. After the event is experienced it must then