Click here to load reader

Agricultural Science I Agricultural Mechanics I Common ... · PDF file Agricultural Mechanics Unit for Agricultural Science I (Student Reference). University of Missouri-Columbia:

  • View
    7

  • Download
    1

Embed Size (px)

Text of Agricultural Science I Agricultural Mechanics I Common ... · PDF file Agricultural Mechanics...

  • Ag Science I – Ag Mechanics I – Common Hand Tools Common Hand Tools for Woodworking • Page 1 of 11

    Course Agricultural Science I

    Unit Agricultural Mechanics I

    Subunit Common Hand Tools

    Lesson Common Hand Tools for Woodworking

    Estimated Time 90 Minutes or 2 50-minute blocks Student Outcome

    Identify common hand tools used in woodworking. Learning Objectives

    1. Identify basic procedures for shop safety. 2. Identify some common measurement tools. 3. Identify some common hand tools for cutting wood. 4. Identify hand tools used for smoothing and shaping wood. 5. Identify hand tools used for drilling and boring. 6. Identify hand tools and materials used for fastening.

    Grade Level Expectations

    Resources, Supplies & Equipment, and Supplemental Information

    Resources 1. PowerPoint Slides

    PPt 1 - Basic Procedures for Shop Safety PPt 2 - Common Measurement Tools PPt 3 - Types of Handsaws PPt 4 - Planes/Cutting a Chamfer PPt 5 - Chisel/Cutting a Dado PPt 6 - Files/Using a File PPt 7 - Drilling and Boring Tools PPt 8 - Fasteners

    2. Activity Sheet

    AS 1 – Identifying Common Woodworking Hand Tools 3. Agricultural Mechanics Unit for Agricultural Science I (Student Reference). University of

    Missouri-Columbia: Instructional Materials Laboratory, 2002. 4. Curriculum Enhancement for Agricultural Mechanics Unit for Agricultural Science I, “Unit I -

    Common Hand Tools.” University of Missouri-Columbia: Instructional Materials Laboratory, 2004.

    Supplemental Information 1. Internet Sites

    Bridgewater, A., and G. Bridgewater. How to Use and Care for Woodworking Tools (limited preview available). Accessed September 7, 2007, from http://books.google.com/books?id=2CmhhPNpJZMC&pg=PP1&dq=How+to+Use

  • Ag Science I – Ag Mechanics I – Common Hand Tools Common Hand Tools for Woodworking • Page 2 of 11

    +%26+Care+for+Woodworking+Tools&sig=lYPLekyUHN-4lh-9LS_01vE_uYQ. Woodworking Tools. Occupational Safety and Health Administration. U. S.

    Department of Labor. Accessed September 7, 2007, from http://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_id=10692&p_ta ble=STANDARDS.

    2. Print Bird, L. Taunton’s Complete Illustrated Guide to Using Woodworking Tools. Newtown,

    CT: Taunton Press, 2004. Bowman, J., and C. Sobun (ed). Basic Woodworking: All the Skills and Tools You Need to

    Get Started. Mechanicsburg, PA: Stackpole Books, 2004. Bridgewater, A., and G. Bridgewater. How to Use and Care for Woodworking Tools.

    Mechanicsburg, PA: Stackpole Books, 1998.

  • Ag Science I – Ag Mechanics I – Common Hand Tools Common Hand Tools for Woodworking • Page 3 of 11

    Instructor Directions Content Outline

    Objective 1

    A number of basic safety procedures apply to almost any work situation. Refer to PPt 1.

    PPt 1 – Basic Procedures for Shop Safety

    Identify basic procedures for shop safety.

    Adhere to instructions from the following sources: 1. Labels and warnings on containers and tools 2. The manufacturer’s recommendations for use and

    maintenance of specific tools 3. Signs posted in the work area 4. Directions given by the instructor Wear safety glasses in the shop at all times. Wear protective gear such as gloves, earplugs, and safety shoes if appropriate. Do not wear loose-fitting clothing that could get caught in a moving part. Wear a hair net to prevent long hair from getting caught in a tool. Keep work areas clean and free of clutter.

    Interest Approach

    1. Ask students to identify hand tools in the shop and their uses. Which tools have students used? Which tools do they want to learn how to use?

    2. Have several common items made of wood displayed in the shop. Ask the students

    what tools they think were necessary to make each item. 3. Provide a list of tools and have students price tools using the Internet. If they had no

    tools, what tools would they purchase to make up a basic tool kit of woodworking hand tools? If there were a number of the same kind of tool by different manufacturers and across a wide price range, which tool would they buy? Would they always buy the cheapest or most expensive? Why? How important is cleaning, reconditioning, and maintaining the tools and why?

    Communicate the Learning Objectives

    1. Identify basic procedures for shop safety. 2. Identify some common measurement tools. 3. Identify some common hand tools for cutting wood. 4. Identify hand tools used for smoothing and shaping wood. 5. Identify hand tools used for drilling and boring. 6. Identify hand tools and materials used for fastening.

  • Ag Science I – Ag Mechanics I – Common Hand Tools Common Hand Tools for Woodworking • Page 4 of 11

    Instructor Directions Content Outline

    Inspect each tool before using it to make sure it is working properly. Tell the instructor about any damaged tool. Do not use a tool that does not function properly. Return each tool to its proper place of storage.

    Objective 2

    Measurement tools are used for determining linear measurements like length and width, for determining area measurements like square feet, and for checking if work is square or level. Refer to PPt 2. (Measurement tools are covered in more detail in Unit III Lesson 1)

    PPt 2 – Common Measurement Tools

    Identify some common measurement tools. Tape measure 1. Available in U.S. customary, metric, or combination 2. Flexible tape can measure straight distances or

    around stock Combination square 1. Rule 2. Marking gauge 3. Level 4. Try square Framing square 1. Used in framing 2. Used in laying out stairs Speed square 1. Used for laying out stairs and rafters 2. Used for measuring and marking miter cuts Level 1. Used to find level 2. Used to find plumb

    Objective 3

    The design of a saw determines what type of cut it makes. Refer to PPt 3. (Saws and sawing are covered in more detail in Unit II Lesson 1 and Unit III Lesson 2.)

    PPt 3 – Types of Handsaws

    Identify some common hand tools for cutting wood. Ripsaw 1. Makes straight cuts 2. Cuts with the grain Crosscut saw 1. Makes straight cuts 2. Cuts across the grain

  • Ag Science I – Ag Mechanics I – Common Hand Tools Common Hand Tools for Woodworking • Page 5 of 11

    Instructor Directions Content Outline

    Backsaw 1. Has a rigid back 2. Can be used for miter cuts Coping saw 1. Has a thin, adjustable blade 2. Used for curves, irregular cuts

    Objective 4 Planes, chisels, files, rasps and forming tools are used for smoothing and shaping wood. Refer to PPts 4-6.

    PPt 4 – Planes/Cutting a

    Chamfer

    PPt 5 – Chisel/Cutting a Dado

    PPt 6 – Files/Using a File

    Identify hand tools used for smoothing and shaping wood.

    Plane 1. Uses

    a. Trimming boards to size b. Beveling c. Cutting a chamfer d. Squaring uneven stock

    2. Types a. Jointer plane (22 to 28 in. long) - Good for smoothing long edges and surfaces

    - Cuts with bevel edge down b. Fore plane (18 in. long) - Good for smoothing long edges and surfaces - Cuts with bevel edge down c. Jack plane (11 to 15 in. long) - All-purpose plane - Cuts with bevel edge down - Good for removing marks such as mill marks d. Smooth plane (6 to 10 in. long) - Efficient for at-home use - Cuts with bevel edge down e. Block plane (length of 4 to 6 in.) - Small enough for one-hand use - Good for close work, particularly on end grain - Cuts with bevel edge up

    3. Technical features a. The blade, also called the plane iron, should be

    set parallel to the bottom, or sole, of the plane. b. A series of cuts to remove a small amount of

    wood with each cut is better than fewer cuts to remove more material with each cut. Attempting to remove too much material at a time could jam the plane or gouge the wood.

    c. When stock is cut square, the shavings should be

  • Ag Science I – Ag Mechanics I – Common Hand Tools Common Hand Tools for Woodworking • Page 6 of 11

    Instructor Directions Content Outline

    the same width as the stock. d. For large surfaces, the shavings should be the

    same width as the cutting edge. e. To avoid damaging the blade, the plane should

    be set on its side when it is not in use. Chisel 1. Uses

    a. Cutting precise grooves for joints, such as rabbet and dado

    b. Can remove wood in thick and thin shavings c. Can be used in places where a saw or plane does

    not fit 2. Technical features

    a. Shavings can be thick or thin, depending on how the chisel is held.

    b. For deeper cuts, the bevel edge is down. c. For lighter, planing cuts, the bevel edge is up. d. A mallet, not a hammer, should be used to drive

    a chisel. The steel head of a hammer could damage the chisel.

    File and rasp 1. Uses

    a. Forming and smoothing irregular shapes such as curves

    b. Rounding sharp edges 2. Different types of files, with variations in cut (pattern

    of teeth), shape, length, and coarseness a. Single-cut - parallel rows of teeth running

    diagonally across the cutting surface b. Double-cut - two rows of teeth that cross over

    each other, with one row bein

Search related