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Agricultural Mechanics Unit 1 Orientation and General Safety

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Text of Agricultural Mechanics Unit 1 Orientation and General Safety

  • Agricultural MechanicsUnit 1Orientation and General Safety

  • Agricultural Mechanics Areas of Concern

  • Agricultural Mechanics Areas of ConcernAgricultural Mechanics Skills This includes areas such as selection, sharpening, care, and correct use of shop tools and equipment; woodwork and simple carpentry; sheet metal work; elementary forge work; electric arc and Oxyacetylene welding; pipe fitting; simple plumbing repairs; and rope work.

  • Agricultural Mechanics Areas of ConcernAgricultural Power and Machinery This includes selection, management, adjustment, operation, maintenance, and repair (excluding major repair requiring specialized equipment and services) of engines, trucks, tractors, trailers, and machinery used in farming and agriculturally-oriented businesses and services.

  • Agricultural Mechanics Areas of ConcernAgricultural Electrical Power and Processing This includes utilization of electricity in the home and in productive enterprises and selection, installation, operation, and maintenance of electrical equipment.

  • Agricultural Mechanics Areas of ConcernAgricultural Structures This includes elementary scale drawing and plan reading; farmstead layout; functional requirements of houses, shelters, and storages; water systems; and septic tanks and sewage disposals.

  • Agricultural Mechanics Areas of ConcernSoil and Water Management This includes elementary leveling; land measurement and mapping; drainage; irrigation; terracing; and contouring.

  • Importance of Agricultural Mechanics Instruction to the Agricultural IndustryMost agricultural work involves some type of mechanical activityApproximately 85% of machinery in operation is out of adjustmentStudent must be able to service and maintain all equipment usedThe investment in equipment is a considerable portion of the capital investmentStudents should be able to recognize when expert mechanical assistance is needed

  • Advantages of Training in Agricultural Mechanics SkillsAids students in discovering mechanical aptitudesTrains students in basic skills needed on the farm and for related agricultural industriesPrepares students for future training in mechanicsPrepares students for entry into job opportunities after high schoolAssists students in maintaining and repairing their own equipment

  • Rules for Keeping an Orderly and Safe Shop

  • Rules for Keeping an Orderly and Safe ShopStore equipment being repaired or constructed in an orderly fashion at the end of the work periodClean and store tools, helmets, and goggles in their proper place at the end of the work periodReport broken tools and equipment the teacherPlace oily rags in covered cans

  • Rules for Keeping an Orderly and Safe ShopTurn off all arc welders when a job is done

    Shut off oxyacetylene welding outfits at cylinders, drain hoses, close oxygen and acetylene blow pipe valves, clean welding tables and restore rods to the holders at the close of the work period

  • Rules for Keeping an Orderly and Safe ShopBe responsible for the area or station assigned to youClean all benches, tables, and the floor at the end of work periodKeep tools and equipment in their proper placesDo not scuffle or join in horseplay in the laboratoryDo not run in the laboratory

  • Rules for Keeping an Orderly and Safe ShopMake sure that all electrical equipment is turned off at the end of the dayUse tools for their specific purpose onlySupply all visitors with eye protection upon entering the laboratoryStore personal property, including project property, in designated locationsCheck all clothes before returning them to lockers after class time

  • Rules for Keeping an Orderly and Safe ShopBe aware of the injury to others when you are doing a task that might affect them this is particularly important when children are around. Children will watch an arc welder, for example, out of curiosity.Keep work areas cleanDo not use equipment unless instructed in its safety and use

  • Rules for Keeping an Orderly and Safe ShopReport all accidents to the instructor as soon as they happenWear clean, protective clothing while in the laboratory area that is:Free from flammable materialsRelatively close-fitting but allowing free movement

  • Rules for Keeping an Orderly and Safe ShopWear appropriate eye and face protectionWear protective hearing devices where applicableWear proper footwear example, boots when weldingContain long hair from equipment and materials

  • Rules for Keeping an Orderly and Safe ShopKnow the proper positioning in which to operate all equipment in the laboratoryKeep the air safe by providing adequate ventilation when welding, painting, etc.Remove all jewelry when working in the laboratoryThink safety at all times

  • Purposes of the Safety Color Code

  • Purposes of the Safety Color CodeReduces glare by diffusing sufficient light for better vision throughout the shopReduces eyestrain, tension, and fatigue by setting off material from machines and work areasPromotes better housekeeping by providing a more pleasing environment

  • Purposes of the Safety Color CodeGreen Applied to non-critical parts of equipment and machined surfaces, nameplates and bearing surfaces; used to designate the location of safety and first aid equipmentYellow Applied to operating levers, wheels, handles, and hazardous areas which may cause stumbling, falling, or tripping; used to designate caution

  • Purposes of the Safety Color CodeOrange Applied to electrical switches, interior surfaces of doors, on fuse and electrical power boxes, movable guards and parts, inside of non-movable guards, traffic lanes, and overhead hazards; used to designate dangerous parts of equipment which may cut, crush, shock or otherwise injure

  • Purposes of the Safety Color CodeRed The physical color associated with fire. Used to identify the location of fire fighting equipment, emergency fire exits, and buttons or levers for electrical switches used for the stopping of machinery. Gasoline cans should be painted red with additional identification in the form of a yellow band around the can.

  • Purposes of the Safety Color CodeBlue Used as the basic color for designating caution against starting equipment while it is being worked on or against the use of defective equipment. Example, a blue tag should be attached to defective equipment stating Out of Order

  • Purposes of the Safety Color CodeIvory Can be applied to table edges, vice jaws, and edges of tool rests to reflect light and show the way

    Aluminum Also unpainted steel Can be applied to tops of tables and work areas to provide contrast with work

  • Nebraska Rules Regarding Eye and Face ProtectionThese rules can become more specific as new laws are passed check current regulations

  • Nebraska Rules Regarding Eye and Face ProtectionProtective eye and face equipment shall be required when there is a reasonable probability of injury that can be prevented by such equipmentNo unprotected person shall knowingly be subjected to a hazardous environmental condition protects student, teacher, and others observing work.

  • Nebraska Rules Regarding Eye and Face ProtectionSuitable eye protectors shall be provided where machines or operations present the hazard of the following:Hot molten metals or other molten materialsMilling, sawing, turning, shaping, cutting, grinding, or stamping of any solid materialsHeat treatment, tempering or kiln firing of any metal or other materialsGas or electric arc welding or other forms of welding processesRepair or servicing of any vehicle where there is danger of injury to the eyes Caustic or explosive materials

  • Nebraska Rules Regarding Eye and Face Protection

    Eye and face protection shall meet the American National Standards for Occupational and Educational Eye and Face Protection

  • Components Necessary for A Fire to Occur

  • Components Necessary for A Fire to OccurFuelOxygenHeatTo produce fire, these three elements are necessary and must be present at the same time. If any one of the three is missing, a fire cannot be started, or with the removal of any one of the three, the fire will be extinguished

  • Classes of Fires

  • Classes of FiresClass A Fires that occur in ordinary combustible materials; examples: woods, rags, and rubbish

    Class B Fires that occur with flammable liquids; examples: gasoline, oil, grease, paints, and thinners

  • Classes of FiresClass C Fires that occur in or near electrical equipment; examples: motors, switchboards, and electrical wiring

    Class D Fires that occur with combustible metals; example: magnesium

  • Types of Fire Extinguishers

  • Types of Fire ExtinguishersPressurized Water Used on Class A fires. This type of fire extinguisher is usually operated by squeezing a handle or trigger.Soda Acid Used on Class A fires. This type of fire extinguisher is operated by turning the extinguisher upside down.Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Used on Class B and C fires. This type is usually operated by squeezing a handle or a trigger.

  • Types of Fire ExtinguishersDry Chemical Used on Class B, C, and D Fires. This type is usually operated by squeezing a handle, trigger, or lever.

    Foam Used on Class A and B fires. This type is operated by turning the extinguisher upside down.

  • Sources of Electrical Defects in Equipment

  • Sources of Electrical Defects in EquipmentGround wire missing, broken, improperly connected or not connected at all.CAUTION: Never remove ground prong on equipment cordsOpen conduits; switch boxes damaged or worn.Worn, wet, or oily insu

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