SHAKESPEAREAN SONNET PETRARCHAN SONNET WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE?

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    23-Dec-2015

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<ul><li> Slide 1 </li> <li> SHAKESPEAREAN SONNET PETRARCHAN SONNET WHATS THE DIFFERENCE? </li> <li> Slide 2 </li> <li> WHAT THEY HAVE IN COMMON 14 lines Strict rhyme scheme. Specific structure. Each line containing ten syllables and written in iambic pentameter, in which a pattern of an unstressed syllable followed by a stressed syllable is repeated five times. </li> <li> Slide 3 </li> <li> SHAKESPEAREAN SONNET Also called Elizabethan Sonnet. The Shakespearean sonnet is broken down into 3 quatrains and 1 couplet. The ending couplet of a Shakespearean sonnet usually reverses the tone or message of the previous quatrains. Rhyme scheme: ABAB-CDCD-EFEF-GG </li> <li> Slide 4 </li> <li> PETRARCHAN SONNET Also called the Italian Sonnet. The Italian commonly is made up of two quatrains (or octave), followed by two tercets (or sestet). Thematically, an Italian sonnet most often relates a conflict (whether physical or spiritual) in the first octave, and comes to a solution in the sestet. Typically, the ninth line creates what is called the "turn" or "volta," which signals the move from proposition to resolution. The Italian sonnet has a more complex frame work, and has more variations. The two quatrains usually runs: ABBA-ABBA, or ABAB-BABA, while the second half was either devided into a sestet of CDC-CDC, or a two tercets of CDE-CDE. </li> </ul>