The Sonnet. Two Major Types Petrarchan Shakespearian.

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  • Slide 1
  • The Sonnet
  • Slide 2
  • Two Major Types Petrarchan Shakespearian
  • Slide 3
  • Two Major Types Petrarchan Shakespearian
  • Slide 4
  • The Sonnet Petrarchan Sonnets: Format: - 14 lines Two Quatrains Concluding Sestet Rhyme Scheme: Quatrains: octave pattern of abbaabba Sestet: cdcdcd, cdecde, cdeed, cddece or cdcdee
  • Slide 5
  • The Sonnet Shakespearian Sonnets: Format: - 14 lines Three Quatrains Couplet Rhyme Scheme: Quatrains: abab, cdcd, and efef Couplet: gg
  • Slide 6
  • The Sonnet Terms to know 1.Meter measuring device 2.Syllable a unit of sound made in speech 3.Lines - a group of words arranged into a row arranged to have a certain number of syllables, stresses, or metrical feet 4.Stanzas groups of lines forming a unit of thought in a poem 1.Meter measuring device 2.Syllable a unit of sound made in speech 3.Lines - a group of words arranged into a row arranged to have a certain number of syllables, stresses, or metrical feet 4.Stanzas groups of lines forming a unit of thought in a poem
  • Slide 7
  • 5. Rhyme Scheme The Pattern a rhyme makes 6. Pentameter- to repeat the iamb five times 7. Quatrain-Four lines of a stanza or poem. 8. Sestet: Six lines of a stanza or poem. 9. Octave: Eight lines of a stanza or poem. 10. Couplet: Two consecutive lines that must rhyme. 11. Argument The Message Of The Poem 12. Volta: The turning point of the poem 5. Rhyme Scheme The Pattern a rhyme makes 6. Pentameter- to repeat the iamb five times 7. Quatrain-Four lines of a stanza or poem. 8. Sestet: Six lines of a stanza or poem. 9. Octave: Eight lines of a stanza or poem. 10. Couplet: Two consecutive lines that must rhyme. 11. Argument The Message Of The Poem 12. Volta: The turning point of the poem The Sonnet Terms to know
  • Slide 8
  • The Living Iambic Pentameter
  • Slide 9
  • The Iambic Pentameter Today I know Ill find my other shoe The man I love is quite illiterate ------now you write an example in your notes
  • Slide 10
  • Example of a Petrarchan sonnet: William Wordsworth's "London, 1802" Milton! thou shouldst be living at this hour: - England hath need of thee: she is a fen - Of stagnant waters: altar, sword, and pen, - Fireside, the heroic wealth of hall and bower, - Have forfeited their ancient English dower - Of inward happiness. We are selfish men; - Oh! raise us up, return to us again; - And give us manners, virtue, freedom, power. - Thy soul was like a Star, and dwelt apart; - Thou hadst a voice whose sound was like the sea: - Pure as the naked heavens, majestic, free, - So didst thou travel on life's common way, - In cheerful godliness; and yet thy heart - The lowliest duties on herself did lay. -
  • Slide 11
  • Example of a Petrarchan sonnet: William Wordsworth's "London, 1802" Milton! thou shouldst be living at this hour: - A England hath need of thee: she is a fen - B Of stagnant waters: altar, sword, and pen, - B Fireside, the heroic wealth of hall and bower, - A Have forfeited their ancient English dower - A Of inward happiness. We are selfish men; - B Oh! raise us up, return to us again; - B And give us manners, virtue, freedom, power. - A Octave - Introduces the theme or problem Thy soul was like a Star, and dwelt apart; - C Thou hadst a voice whose sound was like the sea: - D Pure as the naked heavens, majestic, free, - D So didst thou travel on life's common way, - E In cheerful godliness; and yet thy heart - C The lowliest duties on herself did lay. - E Sestet - Solves the problem
  • Slide 12
  • XCVIII. From you have I been absent in the spring, When proud pied April, dressed in all his trim, Hath put a spirit of youth in every thing, That heavy Saturn laughed and leapt with him. Yet nor the lays of birds, nor the sweet smell Of different flowers in odour and in hue, Could make me any summer's story tell, Or from their proud lap pluck them where they grew: Nor did I wonder at the lily's white, Nor praise the deep vermilion in the rose; They were but sweet, but figures of delight, Drawn after you, you pattern of all those. Yet seemed it winter still, and you away, As with your shadow I with these did play. ABABCDCDEFEFGGABABCDCDEFEFGG
  • Slide 13
  • WritersCafe.org http://www.writerscafe.org/
  • Slide 14
  • Video https://video.search.yahoo.com/video/play;_y lt=A2KLqIH6WC5VRCQA0QEsnIlQ;_ylu=X3oD MTByZWc0
  • Slide 15
  • Modern Poets Bend the Forms...
  • Slide 16
  • What lips my lips have kissed, and where, and why (Sonnet XLIII) What lips my lips have kissed, and where, and why, I have forgotten, and what arms have lain Under my head till morning; but the rain Is full of ghosts tonight, that tap and sigh Upon the glass and listen for reply, And in my heart there stirs a quiet pain For unremembered lads that not again Will turn to me at midnight with a cry. Thus in winter stands the lonely tree, Nor knows what birds have vanished one by one, Yet knows its boughs more silent than before: I cannot say what loves have come and gone, I only know that summer sang in me A little while, that in me sings no more. Edna St. Vincent Millay 1892- 1950 Note: Her use of enjambment and the rhyme scheme of the sestet push the form also the topic not 1 single love
  • Slide 17
  • The Haw Lantern The wintry haw is burning out of season, crab of the thorn, a small light for small people, wanting no more from them but that they keep the wick of self-respect from dying out, not having to blind them with illumination. But sometimes when your breath plumes in the frost it takes the roaming shape of Diogenes with his lantern, seeking one just man; so you end up scrutinized from behind the haw he holds up at eye-level on its twig, and you flinch before its bonded pith and stone, its blood-prick that you wish would test and clear you, its pecked-at ripeness that scans you, then moves on. Seamus Heaney 1939- 2013
  • Slide 18
  • The Haw Lantern The wintry haw is burning out of season, crab of the thorn, a small light for small people, As I re-read The Haw Lantern, it became clear that the lantern in the poem is a metaphor; the haw is a hawthorn bush, and the lantern is the large red berry, or fruit, that grows on it (see pictures). The lantern- berries, the size of crab apples (crab of the thorn), are shining, but they are doing so in winter, bearing fruit out of season": http://english486r.blogspot.c o.uk/2009/03/haw- lantern.html
  • Slide 19
  • The Haw Lantern But sometimes when your breath plumes in the frost it takes the roaming shape of Diogenes with his lantern, seeking one just man;
  • Slide 20
  • Assignment : Write a sonnet. Here are the rules: It must consist of 14 lines. It must be written in iambic pentameter (duh-DUH-duh-DUH-duh-DUH-duh-DUH-duh-DUH). It must be written in one of various standard rhyme schemes. If you're writing the most familiar kind of sonnet, the Shakespearean, the rhyme scheme is this: A B C D E F G Every A rhymes with every A, every B rhymes with every B, and so forth. You'll notice this type of sonnet consists of three quatrains (that is, four consecutive lines of verse that make up a stanza or division of lines in a poem) and one couplet (two consecutive rhyming lines of verse). Create an argument problem solution Review your poem and fix any errors. Type Edit Place in your portfolio
  • Slide 21
  • In the Lab Create your portfolio Type your sonnet Save it to your portfolio Print sonnet and turn it in for a major grade. USA TEST PREP

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