Putting Together the Pieces of Your Financial Puzzle How soon need the money? => Asset allocation 4

  • View
    1

  • Download
    0

Embed Size (px)

Text of Putting Together the Pieces of Your Financial Puzzle How soon need the money? => Asset allocation...

  • 10/8/2018

    1

    Putting Together the Pieces of Your Financial Puzzle Thomas Ford Library Investment Discussion Group – October 9, 2018

    Kirk A. Kreikemeier, CFP®, CFA, FSA 4365 Lawn Avenue, Suite 5 Western Springs, IL 60558

    708‐246‐2366 kirk@pvwealthmgt.com

    • Bombarded with confusing topics but difficult to put in context

    • Implications of decisions seem overwhelming and not sure where to start

    • We will start with a picture capturing the broad financial cycle of life

    • Then will sharpen the focus on key areas and identify three action steps for each

    • Like a puzzle, will start with square edges (base understanding) before filling in pieces

    • No easy button ‐ leave tonight with checklist to do on own or with a professional

    Complete Financial Picture ‐ Fitting Pieces Together

    2

    Agenda

  • 10/8/2018

    2

    4365 Lawn Avenue, Suite 5    Western Springs, IL 60558  |  708 246‐2366  |  pvwealthmgt.com

    Income • Employment • Other (non‐investment) • Company Stock Options

    Checking Account

    Monthly Bills

    Mortgage/ Student  Loans ‐

    (good debt ‐ appreciating 

    assets)

    Outstanding  Balances ‐ credit cards (bad  debt ‐ depreciating 

    assets)

    Social Security / Medicare

    401K / Pensions

    IRA Account (Traditional and Roth)

    Health Savings Account

    529 Accounts

    Taxable Accounts (including reserve funds)

    Set Aside for Your Future

    6.2% SS + 1.45% Medicare1

    Future Goals

    Taxes

    Life Insurance / Annuities

    Estate Planning (Wills, POAs, Trusts)

    NOTES:  1. Employer also contribute 7.65%; extra 0.9% for income > $200k / $250K   2.   Invest gains only taxed upon withdrawal

    2

    Financial Plan Big Picture

    1. Know what you have

    2. Set goals and estimate costs

    3. How do you react to market risk?  How soon need the money? => Asset allocation

    4. What accounts to open to back these goals and basics of investing

    5. Understand key tax brackets and concepts

    6. Save for retirement expenses – where to begin!

    7. Save for portion of college you are paying – they grow quickly

    8. Focus on basic features of insurance and annuities

    9. Understand Social Security and Medicare

    10. You retired!  Where does my paycheck come from?  Don’t forget taxes!  How long last?

    11. Pull it all together, stress test and monitor – especially near retirement

    12. Leave your legacy by design, not default

    Summary of key areas

    4

    Checklist

  • 10/8/2018

    3

    1. Prepare a net worth report • List things you have (assets) and debts owed (liabilities); difference is net worth • Assets – taxable, tax deferred, personal • Liabilities – rate, funding an appreciating or depreciating asset

    2. Understand paycheck * • Start with gross pay and note FICA deductions • Then see amounts to savings, benefits, federal and state taxes

    3. Prepare ‘savings generator’ – i.e. a budget • On paper, spreadsheet or tools available • Start with gross pay, list savings (pay self first), expenses, taxes • Begin tracking actual; make sure going where want; “have to measure to manage”

    * Blog Post:  “Wrap the Gift of Financial Wisdom for the College Graduate”

    What have?  Money coming in?  Where does it go?

    5

    #1 – What Have,  In, Out

    Net Worth, Paycheck and Budget Examples

    6

    #1 – What Have,  In, Out

  • 10/8/2018

    4

    1. Identify items wanted in the future not covered by current job income • Emergency fund for unexpected; 3‐6 months’ expenses; keep liquid and safe • Retirement living, health costs and college are common • Travel that ends after x years; wedding costs; fun money • Changing homes?  State of residence may impact travel and taxes

    2. Estimate cost in today’s dollars with assumed inflation • Use current expenses as a guide and apply inflation • Health costs and college have higher inflation; fixed mortgage has none • Consider reduction in living expenses at advanced ages

    3. Prioritize into needs, wants, wishes • Able to focus if funds are tight • Determine portion of ‘needs’ covered by ‘annuity‐like’ income if wish

    Set your goals and estimate costs

    7

    #2 – Set Goals and  Estimate Costs

    Set your goals and estimate costs

    8

    #2 – Set Goals and  Estimate Costs

    Identify expense amounts  with appropriate inflation

    Graphical summary of  above expense needs

  • 10/8/2018

    5

    1. Complete risk questionnaire • Questions help determine how you react to market volatility • Range from general questions (custodian) to robust research‐based (Finametrica)

    2. Choose portfolio consistent with risk tolerance and time horizon • Key consideration is tolerance for loss and volatility of portfolio • Consider how soon need money – emergency fund, college savings, retirement

    3. Establish portfolios with various asset classes and different weights • Historically used 60/40 stocks/bonds; now – add international, refine stocks/bonds, alternatives • Different portfolios have same asset classes but % in asset class varies • Some ‘easy‐button’ funds – target‐date (retirement) and age‐based (529s)

    How handle market risk? How soon need money

    9

    #3 – Gut and time  => Allocation

    How handle market risk? How soon need money

    10

    #3 – Gut and time  => Allocation

    Growth of $100 9/25/98–9/24/18   Source:  Morningstar, PVWM Research

    Asset Class Benchmarks

    Total Ret 1Yr

    Total Ret

    10Yr

    Std Dev 1Yr

    Std Dev 10Yr

    DJ US TSM Large Cap TR USD 17.95 11.99 8.94 14.41 DJ US TSM Small Cap TR USD 14.48 12.69 9.32 19.38 MSCI EAFE NR USD 2.74 5.38 9.12 17.44 MSCI EM NR USD -0.81 5.40 13.29 21.25 BBgBarc US Trsy Bellwethers 5 Yr -2.05 2.65 2.22 3.77 BBgBarc US Trsy Bellwethers 30Y -3.75 5.01 8.67 15.51 BBgBarc US Corp Bond TR USD -1.19 6.35 2.78 5.44 BBgBarc US Corporate High Yield T 3.05 9.46 2.00 10.05 BBgBarc Short Treasury 1-3 Mon T 1.53 0.31 0.11 0.14

    Source:  Morningstar Office ‐ 9/30/18; PVWM Research

  • 10/8/2018

    6

    1. Who holds the money and executes trades? • Custodian is firm where open an account ‐ brokerage, 401k, bank, insurance company • Investment range:  Brokerage ‐ full; 401k ‐ limited; bank – savings, CDs; ins co ‐ annuities

    2. Types of investment securities • Individual companies issue stocks and bonds • Mutual funds and exchange‐traded‐funds (ETFs) have basket of stocks or bonds for diversification • More refined strategies ranging from options, factor‐based funds, commodities, currency

    3. Type of underlying risk of investment • Know what type of stock or bond is inside a mutual fund or ETF owned • Should map to asset classes used for asset allocation • Morningstar Instant X‐Ray – not detailed but good start; careful with bonds; verify all holdings used

    http://portfolio.morningstar.com/RtPort/Free/InstantXRayDEntry.aspx

    What accounts to open; basics of investing

    11

    #4 – Where Invest?   In What?

    What accounts to open; securities to invest

    12

    #4 – Where Invest?   In What?

    Output of Morningstar X‐Ray  Funds, ETFs, Individual Stocks Source:  Blackrock

  • 10/8/2018

    7

    1. Tax brackets and marginal rates • Progressive tax rate and how next dollar of income is taxed • Federal varies by single vs. joint filing; states range from 0% to flat % to progressive • Know what marginal bracket in now vs. what expect during retirement

    2. Ordinary income vs. capital gains/qualified dividends * • Wage income is ‘ordinary’; capital gains / qualified at lower rate • Some investment income is qualified, rest is non‐qualified => ordinary • Capital gains tax depends on time held; if  ordinary

    3. Tax qualified accounts ‐ deductible, deferred, taxed when withdrawn? • Taxing the seed or harvest?  Limitations on withdrawals?  Apply to federal and state? • What tax bracket when deducted vs. withdrawn?  Ordinary income or qualified?

    *  Extra 3.8% Medicare taxes on investment income > $200k (single), $250k (joint)

    Understand key tax brackets and concepts

    13

    #5 – Tax Tidbits:  Fed and State

    Understand key tax brackets and concepts

    14

    #5 – Tax Tidbits:  Fed and State