On the Classification of My Drawings and Paintings

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  • Leonardo

    On the Classification of My Drawings and PaintingsAuthor(s): Paul RSource: Leonardo, Vol. 14, No. 2 (Spring, 1981), p. 172Published by: The MIT PressStable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1574455 .Accessed: 12/06/2014 21:48

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  • Leonardo, Vol. 14, No. 2, pp. 172-176. Pergamon Press Ltd., 1981. Printed in Great Britian.

    LETTERS

    Leonardo, Vol. 14, No. 2, pp. 172-176. Pergamon Press Ltd., 1981. Printed in Great Britian.

    LETTERS

    Leonardo, Vol. 14, No. 2, pp. 172-176. Pergamon Press Ltd., 1981. Printed in Great Britian.

    LETTERS

    Readers' comments are welcomed on texts published in Leonardo. The Editors reserve the right to shorten letters. Letters should be written in English or in French. Readers' comments are welcomed on texts published in Leonardo. The Editors reserve the right to shorten letters. Letters should be written in English or in French. Readers' comments are welcomed on texts published in Leonardo. The Editors reserve the right to shorten letters. Letters should be written in English or in French.

    ON PICTURES WITHIN PICTURES (cont.)

    Here is a short comment on David Carrier's article in Leonardo 12, 197 (1979). I think some painters would agree with the premise in his article but disagree with the conclusion he draws in his last paragraph: 'It is clearly difficult to provide evidence to support convincingly claims of finding unconscious quotations in pictures...'

    Painters may be assumed to be aware of many influences on the execution of their paintings: visual, aural, tactile, olfactory, political, aesthetic, social, historical, etc. They may also be aware that both conscious and unconscious mental processes affect their execution. Thus, paintings may be the result both of conscious and rational forethought and of an unconscious thought process.

    Occasionally I recognize that something has appeared in one of my paintings in the form of an unconscious quotation, but I have not attempted to provide evidence for this occurrence in order to contradict Carrier's conclusion-perhaps I should do so.

    Mark David Gottsegen Dept. of Art

    University of North Carolina Greensboro, NC 27412, U.S.A.

    ON PICTURES WITHIN PICTURES (cont.)

    Here is a short comment on David Carrier's article in Leonardo 12, 197 (1979). I think some painters would agree with the premise in his article but disagree with the conclusion he draws in his last paragraph: 'It is clearly difficult to provide evidence to support convincingly claims of finding unconscious quotations in pictures...'

    Painters may be assumed to be aware of many influences on the execution of their paintings: visual, aural, tactile, olfactory, political, aesthetic, social, historical, etc. They may also be aware that both conscious and unconscious mental processes affect their execution. Thus, paintings may be the result both of conscious and rational forethought and of an unconscious thought process.

    Occasionally I recognize that something has appeared in one of my paintings in the form of an unconscious quotation, but I have not attempted to provide evidence for this occurrence in order to contradict Carrier's conclusion-perhaps I should do so.

    Mark David Gottsegen Dept. of Art

    University of North Carolina Greensboro, NC 27412, U.S.A.

    ON PICTURES WITHIN PICTURES (cont.)

    Here is a short comment on David Carrier's article in Leonardo 12, 197 (1979). I think some painters would agree with the premise in his article but disagree with the conclusion he draws in his last paragraph: 'It is clearly difficult to provide evidence to support convincingly claims of finding unconscious quotations in pictures...'

    Painters may be assumed to be aware of many influences on the execution of their paintings: visual, aural, tactile, olfactory, political, aesthetic, social, historical, etc. They may also be aware that both conscious and unconscious mental processes affect their execution. Thus, paintings may be the result both of conscious and rational forethought and of an unconscious thought process.

    Occasionally I recognize that something has appeared in one of my paintings in the form of an unconscious quotation, but I have not attempted to provide evidence for this occurrence in order to contradict Carrier's conclusion-perhaps I should do so.

    Mark David Gottsegen Dept. of Art

    University of North Carolina Greensboro, NC 27412, U.S.A.

    describing the specific role of homospatial thinking in producing those structures. Following that, I report documentary and empirically derived evidence indicating diverse types of creative functions of the homospatial process such as Beckmann's global bringing together of sensory characteristics, Gleizes and Metzinger and Moore's superimposition of self on material, Louis Kahn's superimposition of a circle and parallel lines in an architectural design, along with instances of the production of visual metaphor. It is perhaps because I start with metaphor that Hausman has mistakenly focused primarily on analyses of metaphor, stressed general problems about verbal exposition of visual metaphorical qualities with respect to the 'Mona Lisa' and labelled the process of homospatial thinking as a 'theory' or 'an idea'. The notion of visual metaphor surely has theoretical status and, although Hausman and I agree about the importance of metaphorical structures and on the paradoxical nature of these structures, such points are surely propositional. The homospatial process, however, is a form of cognition scientifically identified through detailed observations, documented reports and con- trolled experiments (which I have recently reported); it is not merely a thesis deduced from the interaction analyses of Richards or of others. Also, as I believe I have presented in The Emerging Goddess, it can be demonstrated in varying art styles and traditions throughout history, as well as in a broad spectrum of inventive and creative pursuits.

    describing the specific role of homospatial thinking in producing those structures. Following that, I report documentary and empirically derived evidence indicating diverse types of creative functions of the homospatial process such as Beckmann's global bringing together of sensory characteristics, Gleizes and Metzinger and Moore's superimposition of self on material, Louis Kahn's superimposition of a circle and parallel lines in an architectural design, along with instances of the production of visual metaphor. It is perhaps because I start with metaphor that Hausman has mistakenly focused primarily on analyses of metaphor, stressed general problems about verbal exposition of visual metaphorical qualities with respect to the 'Mona Lisa' and labelled the process of homospatial thinking as a 'theory' or 'an idea'. The notion of visual metaphor surely has theoretical status and, although Hausman and I agree about the importance of metaphorical structures and on the paradoxical nature of these structures, such points are surely propositional. The homospatial process, however, is a form of cognition scientifically identified through detailed observations, documented reports and con- trolled experiments (which I have recently reported); it is not merely a thesis deduced from the interaction analyses of Richards or of others. Also, as I believe I have presented in The Emerging Goddess, it can be demonstrated in varying art styles and traditions throughout history, as well as in a broad spectrum of inventive and creative pursuits.

    describing the specific role of homospatial thinking in producing those structures. Following that, I report documentary and empirically derived evidence indicating diverse types of creative functions of the homospatial process such as Beckmann's global bringing together of sensory characteristics, Gleizes and Metzinger and Moore's superimposition of self on material, Louis Kahn's superimposition of a circle and parallel lines in an architectural design, along with instances of the production of visual metaphor. It is perhaps because I start with metaphor that Hausman has mistakenly focused primarily on analyses of metaphor, stressed general problems about verbal exposition of visual metaphorical qualities with respect to the 'Mona Lisa' and labelled the process of homospatial thinking as a 'theory' or 'an idea'. The notion of visual metaphor surely has theoretical status and, although Hausman and I agree about the importance of metaphorical structures and on the paradoxical nature of these structures, such points are surely propositional. The homospatial process, however, is a form of cognition scientifically identified through detailed observations, documented reports and con- trolled experiments (which I have recently reported); it is not merely a thesis deduced from the interaction analyses of