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OAT Toolkit for Social Studies Using OAT Grade 5 Score Reports

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  • OAT Toolkit for Social StudiesUsing OAT Grade 5 Score Reports

  • To improve student achievement results, use data to focus on a few simple, specific goals.

    Mike Schmoker

    Why analyze data?

  • Assessments: Classroom, School, District, StateCompileDataAnalysis,Interpretationand DialogueDetermine AlignedResourcesCurriculum Design and Planning for New Learning and Re-TeachingStandardsStandardsStandardsClassroom ImplementationStandardsData Analysis CycleStandardsStandards

  • Enhanced Class Score ReportPage one is a welcome page. One item to note on this page is the web address for Ohios Instructional Management System (IMS): http://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ode/ims/On this site you can access released test items, model lessons, research on social studies education and other resources.

  • See the bottom of page 1 for information on the SUCCESS web site.SUCCESS Web Site

  • Compare your class average with district and state averages.Ohio Achievement Test Results

  • Performance LevelsView the percentage of students who achieved each performance level.

  • Standard Categories

  • Standard Categories

  • Standard Categories

  • Standard Categories

  • On which standards were your students most successful? Least successful?On which standards does your class exceed the district or state average? Are those items clustered around a specific skill or content?On which standards does your class fall below the district or state average? Are those items clustered around a specific skill or content?Interpreting the Data

  • Consider the OAT data using three filters:What does this mean forCurriculum?Instruction?Assessment?

    Interpreting the Data

  • Interpreting the Data

  • Interpreting the Data

  • Interpreting the Data

  • Question 25, Grade 5 OAT in Social Studies, 2007:Interpreting the DataWhich newspaper headline would give you information about why a town is having an election next week?

    A. Councilman Quits to Take Job in Private Industry B. Council Votes to Increase Property Taxes C. Mayor Takes Oath of Office D. Crime Rate Rises in City

  • Interpreting the DataCommentary:

    This multiple-choice question asks students to use a source (a newspaper headline) to identify a possible cause-and-effect relationship to make an inference (a conclusion). Response A is correct, because if a councilman quits or resigns from his position, there is an empty position on the town council, which means that the town will have an election. Response B is incorrect because a town council voting for higher taxes does not involve an election. Response C is incorrect because a mayor would not take the oath of office before an election, but afterwards. Response D is incorrect; because while current officials might not be re-elected if crime goes up, an election would not occur solely because of a rise in crime.

  • Which benchmark is being assessed?How does this item test understanding of the benchmark?What is the cognitive level of this item?What can we learn from student performance on this item?Discussion Questions

  • How did your students fare with these items?Do they frequently write in the classroom?Are they expected to answer questions completely and to provide supporting details?Do they share examples of thorough responses?

    Constructed response items include both short answer and extended response. Though few in number, they have a significant impact on the total score.

    Constructed Response Items

  • Interpreting the Data

  • Interpreting the DataQuestion 11, Grade 5 OAT in Social Studies, 2007:In your Answer Document, give one reason English colonists came to Virginia and settled in Jamestown.

    Describe one way their experience was different from what they had expected. (2 points)

  • Scoring Guidelines for Item 11 (Short Answer):

    Exemplar:The English who settled in Jamestown were hoping to get rich quickly by finding gold. In reality, there was no gold there, and the only way the colony eventually prospered was by planting and selling tobacco.

    Other correct responses may include but are not limited to:Goals:They wanted to live like gentlemen. They wanted to acquire land.They wanted to make money for their joint-stock company.

    Results:Many fell ill from diseases. Many starved.The land was not suitable. They had to work hard.At one point they only survived due to food and water provided by local American Indians.

    Interpreting the Data

  • Scoring Guidelines for Item 11 (Short Answer):Interpreting the Data2 pointResponse includes one explanation why the English settled in Jamestown AND a correct description of one way in which reality was different from settlers expectations.1 pointResponse includes one correct explanation why English colonists settled in Jamestown OR a correct description of one way their experience was other than what settlers expected. The noncredit part of the response may be incorrect, overly general or vague, or missing.0 pointThe response does meet the criteria to earn one point. The response indicates inadequate or no understanding of the task and/or the idea or concept needed to answer the item. It may only repeat information given in the test item. The response may provide an incorrect solution/response and the provided supportive information may be totally irrelevant to the item, or possibly, no other information is shown. The student may have written on a different topic or written, I dont know.

  • Which benchmark is being assessed?How does this item test understanding of the benchmark?What is the cognitive level of this item?What can we learn from student performance on this item?Questions to Consider

  • Grade-band Achievement TestsMYTH: The grade five OAT is a test designed to measure what students have learned in their fifth grade year.FACT: The grade five OAT test is a Grade-band test designed to measure what students have learned in their social studies classes in grades three, four, and five based on Ohios Academic Content Standards.

  • Interpreting the Data: Grade bandsQuestion 2, Grade 5 OAT in Social Studies, 2007:

    Where the press is free, and every man able to read, all is safe.

    Thomas Jefferson, 1816

    Which American document guarantees the freedom described above?

    the Articles of Confederationthe United States Constitutionthe Emancipation Proclamationthe Declaration of Independence

  • Interpreting the DataItem 2 Commentary:

    This multiple-choice question asks students to identify from a list of documents the one that guarantees the freedom described in Jeffersons quote (where the press is free). The United States Constitution (Response B) is correct because the Constitution includes the First Amendment which guarantees freedom of the press, an important freedom in a democracy. The Articles of Confederation (Response A) provided a framework for the government of the original thirteen colonies with little mention of individual rights. The Emancipation Proclamation (Response C) is the document that freed slaves in Confederate states during the Civil War. The Declaration of Independence (Response D) was for the most part a list of grievances which the colonists had and urged independence from England.

  • How does this item test understanding of the benchmark?What is the cognitive level of this item?What can we learn from student performance on this item?Questions to Consider

  • Review alignment of lesson plans and assessments with the knowledge and skills explained in the benchmark and grade-level indicators.Work with third and fourth grade teachers to plan together. Start by looking at how each grade contributes to understanding of the benchmarks. How can we make connections between grade levels? Review classroom resources and materials and identify gaps. Talk to the Media Specialist about supplemental texts, Web resources, or audio/visual materials. Review classroom assessments to ensure that they push students to explain their answers and make connections between ideas.

    Next Steps

  • If we are not going to try to improve what we do, there is little sense in assessing it.

    William Glasser

  • Glasser, William. (1990) The Quality School: Managing Students Without Coercion. New York: Harper Collins.

    Mertler, Craig A. Interpreting Standardized Test Scores, Strategies for Data-Driven Instructional Decision Making. Sage Publications, Inc. Thousand Oaks, 2007.

    Schmoker, M. First Things First: Demystifying Data Analysis.Educational Leadership, vol.60 n5 p22-24 Feb 2003.Resources

    Schmoker, M. First Things First: Demystifying Data Analysis. Educational Leadership, v60 n5 p22-24 Feb 2003. Data analysis is an essential part of standards based education. We start by looking at assessments. At the beginning of the year these may be diagnostic or pre-assessments, but we know assessments can take many forms from the classroom level to the state-wide achievement tests.

    We then use our standards to help us compile data on student performance. Standards are again our filter as we analyze and interpret that data. Dialog can be an essential part of this analysis! Teams of teachers can work together to analyze classroom assessment data or even OAT data.

    Curriculum design and planning is driven by the analysis of data, combined with alignment to the academic content standards.

    Standards then drive the process to the next step of determining aligned resources available for instruction. Notice how far into the process resources and materials are discussed! Resources (textbooks) do not drive instruction in a stan

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