The Shakespearean (or English) Sonnet. Sonnet Form The sonnet is a fourteen line poem. The Shakespearean sonnet is written in iambic pentameter.

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    17-Dec-2015

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  • Slide 1
  • The Shakespearean (or English) Sonnet
  • Slide 2
  • Sonnet Form The sonnet is a fourteen line poem. The Shakespearean sonnet is written in iambic pentameter.
  • Slide 3
  • Iambic Pentameter Lines that ideally have five unstressed syllables, each followed by a stressed syllable, are referred to as iambic pentameter. Example: Shall I/ compare/ thee to/ a sum/ mers day.
  • Slide 4
  • Meter Meter is the regular pattern of accented and unaccented syllables in a line of poetry. Each unit of meter is known as a foot.
  • Slide 5
  • Pentameter If there are five feet in a line of poetry, it is referred to as pentameter. Example: Two houses both alike in dignity Two hous/ es both/ a like/ in dig/ ni ty
  • Slide 6
  • Rhyme Rhyme is the occurrence of similar or identical sounds at the ends of two or more words. Examples: cathat badfad
  • Slide 7
  • End Rhyme End rhyme occurs at the ends of lines. Example: I cannot go to school today, Said little Peggy Ann McKay. (Shel Silverstein)
  • Slide 8
  • Slant Rhyme Slant rhyme is also known as near rhyme. Slant rhyme occurs when the sounds are not quite identical. Examples: care dear
  • Slide 9
  • Rhyme Scheme Rhyme scheme is the pattern of end rhyme in a poem. The pattern is charted by assigning a letter of the alphabet to each line. Lines that rhyme are assigned the same letter.
  • Slide 10
  • Example of Rhyme Scheme Jack and Jill a went up the hilla to fetch a pail of water.b Jack fell downc and broke his crownc and Jill came tumbling after.b (Note that water and after are slant rhymes)
  • Slide 11
  • Rhythm Rhythm refers to the pattern of flow of sound created by the arrangement of stressed and unstressed syllables in a line of poetry. A regular pattern of rhythm is called meter.

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