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The Inferno From The Divine Comedy By Dante Alighieri

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  • The Inferno From The Divine Comedy By Dante Alighieri
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  • Dante Alighieri: 1265 - 1321 Middle Ages Social Chaos Florence Powerful Military Struggle Parents Both Died Raised by Step- Mother Self-educated Prior (Politics) Elected Official Exiled La Vita Nuova Beatrice Not Gemma Donati Commedia Divine Comedy Inferno Purgatorio Paradiso
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  • CHURCH (POPE) VS STATE (HOLY ROMAN EMPIRE) After the collapse of the Roman Empire, there were attempts to recreate the Holy Roman Empire. Conflicts between various Popes and emperors continued for hundreds of years. In Dantes time, both the Pope and the emperor claimed political authority.
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  • CITY-STATES: CONFLICTS AND FACTIONS Guelphs and Ghibellines (think of these two groups in terms of Republicans and Democrats). The Guelphs supported the Pope The Ghibellines supported the Emperor. The Guelphs split into two subparties-Blacks and Whites Much blood was shed over these issues.
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  • Pope Boniface VIII sided with the Black faction; members of the White faction were persecuted. Dante (a white Guelph) was exiled from his native Florence. He never returned. Dantes experiences in this volatile political climate lead to the creation of The Divine Comedy. The Divine Comedy includes The Inferno, Purgatory, Paradise.
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  • LANGUAGE Written in Tuscan Italian (Not Latin) Terza rima = third rhyme Tercets: 3-line stanzas Chain rhyme: A-B-A, B-C-B, C-D-C, D-E-D. # of lines in any canto always a multiple of 3 with 1 left over
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  • Hell Nine Circles Each circle representing progressively worse sins Three types of sin Incontinence - weakness in controlling one's desires and natural urges (lust, gluttony, greed) Violence Against Self, others, God Fraud hypocrites, thieves
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  • The Inferno
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  • Sandro Botticelli Chart of Hell (1480-95 )
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  • Important things to examine The number 3. Divine Retribution- the punishment fits the sin. Free Will- all occupants of hell chose to sin and not seek forgiveness. Allegory: a form of literature in which objects and persons represent ideas or qualities Allusion: a reference to a literary or historical person or event (look for mythological, biblical, and historical allusions Dantes dual role as Poet and Protagonist
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  • Number 3 God of 3 Father Son Holy Spirit Afterlife Hell Purgatory Paradise Cantos 33 + 1 = 34
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  • Canto I: Dark Forest Disorientation Spiritual Physical Psychological Moral Political Dream-like state Internal journey Good Friday Gustave Dor: Canto I
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  • Dante Narrator Main character (protagonist) and traveler Parallels Dante Alighieri (author) simplified version: sympathetic, fearful of danger, confused adopts a more pitiless attitude toward the punishment of sinners
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  • Leopard The first character whom Dante meets Spotted leopard symbolizes Malice Avarice (greed) Fraud
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  • Lion The second character whom Dante meets Intimating lion symbolizes Violence Pride Savagery
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  • She-Wolf The third character whom Dante meets Insatiable, hungry she-wolf symbolizes Self-indulgence Concupiscence Lust Envy
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  • Virgil Ancient (Classic) Roman poet 70 - 19 B.C. Aeneid Appears to Dante Admired by Dante in real life Becomes his guide Through Hell and Purgatory
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  • Canto III: Gates of Hell Outer Circle of Hell Cowardly Souls Fence-sitters Opportunists Neutrals Angels who refused to choose between God and Lucifer William Blake: Dante and Virgil at the Gates of Hell
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  • Inscription I AM THE WAY INTO THE CITY OF WOE. I AM THE WAY TO A FORSAKEN PEOPLE. I AM THE WAY INTO ETERNAL SORROW. SACRED JUSTICE MOVED MY ARCHITECT. I WAS RAISED HERE BY DIVINE OMNIPOTENCE, PRIMORDIAL LOVE AND ULTIMATE INTELLECT. ONLY THOSE ELEMENTS TIME CANNOT WEAR WERE MADE BEFORE ME, AND BEYOND TIME I STAND. ABANDON ALL HOPE YE WHO ENTER HERE.
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  • Trinity DIVINE OMNIPOTENCE or Divine Power God, Father PRIMORDIAL LOVE or Primal Love Jesus Christ, Son ULTIMATE INTELLECT or Highest Wisdom Holy Ghost/ Spirit Gate established by the Christian God ( Trinity )
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  • Uncommitted/Cowards Souls not rebellious against God and yet not committed Feared authority Blamed others Followed directions grumbling Rejected by both God & Satan
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  • Charon Ferries travelers across the Acheron River (aka: Styx) Angry Flaming eyes Wooly jowls Bows to Gods will Reference to Classic mythology
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  • Sam Carbaughs Comics
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  • Canto V: 2 nd Circle of Hell The Lustful Whirlwinds Uncontrollable William Blake: Dante's Inferno, Whirlwind of Lovers
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  • Minos Legendary King of Crete Occupies threshold of the 2nd Circle Assigns places to the damned Wraps tail # matches level of hell
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  • Lancelot, Cleopatra, Dido, Helen, Tristan & Achilles Those guilty of the sin of lust Historical & Classical figures
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  • Mark Antony & Cleopatra
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  • Francesca and Paolo Symbol of lust, free- will, carefree passions Adulterous couple killed by Francescas husband, Paolos brother Giovanni Malatesta, of Rimini
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  • Images Icon images created by Suloni Robertson from her own paintings. Copyright Suloni Robertson 2002-2004. All rights reserved. Blake: Illustrations to the Divine Comedy of Dante, by William Blake. London: National Art-Collections Fund, 1922. Reproduction and use courtesy of the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center. Botticelli: Drawings by Sandro Botticelli for Dante's Divina Commedia; reduced facsimiles after the originals in the Royal museum, Berlin, and in the Vatican library. London: Lawrence and Bullen, 1896. Dor: Dante's Inferno, Translated by the Rev. Henry Francis Cary, M. A., from the Original of Dante Alighieri, and Illustrated with the Designs of M. Gustave Dor. New York: P. F. Collier, 1885. Dor: Purgatory and Paradise, translated by Henry Francis Cary, from the original of Dante Alighieri, and illustrated with the designs of Gustave Dor. New ed., with critical and explanatory notes. New York, P.F. Collier, [1892?]. Flaxman: Compositions of John Flaxman, Sculptor, R. A., from the Divine Poem of Dante Alighieri, Containing Hell, Purgatory and Paradise; engraved by Thomas Piroli. London: Longman, Hurst, Rees, and Orme, 1807. Vellutello: Dante con l'espositioni di Christoforo Landino, et d'Alessandro Vellutello; unknown artist. Venice: Gio. Battista, & Gio. Bernardo Sessa, fratelli, 1596. Reproduction and use courtesy of the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center.
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  • Helpful Websites http://danteworlds.laits.utexas.edu /index2.html http://foxtwin.com/inferno/