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Public Consultation Strategy for ULSTER SCOTS Language, Heritage and Culture JULY 2012

Strategy for Ulster Scots Language Heritage and Culture

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Text of Strategy for Ulster Scots Language Heritage and Culture

Public Consultation

Strategy for

ULSTER SCOTSLanguage, Heritage and Culture

JULY 2012

ContentsMINISTERIAL FOREWORD EXECUTIVE SUMMARY PART 1: INTRODUCTION PART 2: CONTEXT AND VISION PART 3: AIMS, OBJECTIVES AND STAKEHOLDERS PART 4: AREAS FOR ACTION PART 5: IMPLEMENTATION, MONITORING AND ACCOUNTABILITY PART 6: EQUALITY IMPACT ASSESSMENT (EQIA) PART 7: CONSULTATION QUESTIONS 3 4 6 8 13 16 27 29 45

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Ministerial ForewordI am very pleased to endorse this draft Strategy for the Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture. As an active Irish learner, I recognise and appreciate the importance of Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture. Language, heritage and culture are important to all of us; they give us a sense of place and help us to understand who we are and have confidence in our identity. Surveys have been used to estimate the numbers of people who can speak Ulster Scots as well as indicating support for those who wish to learn and use the language. Given our rich cultural mix we need to develop and strengthen the Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture. This Strategy builds on the commitments in the Good Friday Agreement and the St Andrews Agreement. For many years, Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture has been sustained by dedicated individuals, volunteers and communities working together locally often with little recognition or support from government. The future development of Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture depends on the commitment of everyone in the Ulster-Scots sector, the Ulster Scots Agency, the Ministerial Advisory Group Ulster Scots Academy, the wider community, government departments and the Executive. This Strategy seeks to promote increased awareness about Ulster Scots and ensure that the needs of the Ulster-Scots community in education, broadcasting and accessing public services are met. It also recognises the tourist and economic potential of Ulster Scots and seeks to develop and exploit this potential. The Strategys success depends upon the support of those in the grass roots Ulster-Scots communities. People in these communities keep the language and traditions alive passing the rich cultural mix on to the next generation. We must encourage and proactively support them in this work to ensure the sustainability of this unique dimension of our rich cultural mix.

Carl N Chuiln MLA Minster of Culture, Arts and Leisure

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Executive SummaryIn its Programme for Government 2011-2015 the Executive has included a Strategy for the Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture as a key building block under Priority 4 Building a Strong and Shared Community. The purpose of this public consultation exercise is to publicly seek views and feedback on the content of this draft Strategy which provides aims, objectives and areas for action to proactively protect, enhance and develop the Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture. Full public consultation with all relevant stakeholders is critical to ensure that the draft Strategy is developed in as comprehensive and wide ranging a way as possible. The key aims of the draft Strategy are to: create a framework where the Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture can flourish and be shared and enjoyed; protect and support the development and learning the Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture; and promote wider understanding and recognition of the Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture. The draft Strategy has the following objectives: increase educational provision of all aspects of Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture; increase access to Ulster Scots language media including online material; promote the economic benefits of the Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture; and promote research in relation to the Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture. Key areas for action to protect, enhance and develop the Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture include Education; Media; Use of Language; Public Services; Culture.

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In order to ensure that the public consultation is as comprehensive and robust as possible the consultation period will be extended from the recommended 12 weeks to 20 weeks beginning on the 11 July and closing on the 27 November 2012. Those responding to the consultation are asked to consider the key consultation questions set out throughout this document and provide their views and opinions. For ease of reference, all questions are also set out at Part 7. Those responding can of course provide their feedback on any aspect of the draft Strategy in any format that best suits their needs. Part 6 of the consultation document contains an Equality Impact Assessment (EQIA) which suggests that bringing forward an Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture will not have any adverse impacts. Those responding are also asked to consider the EQIA and provide any further relevant information which they think might be useful in assessing the equality of impacts in relation to the 9 Section 75 categories or suggesting if there are other equality issues which should be addressed by the EQIA.

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Part 1: IntroductionConsultation process How to Respond 1.1 This consultation document is designed to seek your views on the Executives Ulster Scots, language, heritage and culture Strategy. The Strategy set out the aims, objectives and areas for action designed to enhance and develop Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture. You can respond to the consultation online through the Departments website or by email or post. Responses should be returned no later than 5:00pm on Tuesday 27 November 2012. Online: Email: Post: www.dcalni.gov.uk [email protected] Response Co-ordinator Language Strategies Team Department of Culture, Arts and Leisure Level 7 Causeway Exchange 1-7 Bedford Street Belfast BT2 7EG 028 9051 5057 028 9052 7668

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The consultation document is available on the website www.dcalni.gov.uk Should you require this document in an accessible format such as Braille, audio-tape or large print please contact the response co-ordinator at the email address or phone number above. Once this initial consultation process has been completed and the responses analysed, the Department may decide to contact some of the interested parties for more information or to clarify their consultation feedback. The Department will publish a summary of responses following the completion of the consultation process. If you would prefer your response to be treated as confidential, please let us know, stating your reasons clearly. Any automatic confidentiality disclaimer generated by your IT 6

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system will be taken to apply only to information in your response for which confidentiality has been specifically requested. 1.7 If we are asked to disclose responses under Freedom of Information legislation, we will take any requests for confidentiality into account. However, confidentiality cannot be guaranteed. We will handle appropriately any personal data you provide in accordance with the Data Protection Act 1998. For further information about confidentiality of responses, please contact the Information Commissioners Office or see the Commissioners website at www.informationcommissioner.gov.uk

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Equality Considerations 1.10 DCAL is conducting an Equality Impact Assessment (EQIA) as part of this public consultation process. Details of the EQIA and how to respond are provided at Part 6 of this consultation document

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Part 2: Context and VisionHistorical context 2.1 Ulster Scots is part of a linguistic tradition which stretches back around 1400 years. The Scots language originated with the language of the Angles who arrived in Scotland about 600AD. During the Middle Ages this language developed until a distinct Scots language had evolved. Population movements and cultural connections between the northeast of Ireland and western Scotland date before English was spoken in either place. During the 6th and 7th centuries the kingdom of Dalriada stretched across the North Channel to embrace both coastal regions. Originally, the Scots language was limited to what is now the South East of Scotland, then part of the Anglo-Saxon Kingdom of Northumbria. Over the centuries, population movements carried it further north until it was the dominant language of Southern, Central and Eastern Scotland. Scots was the national language of Scotland for over 300 years, from the late 15th to the early 18th Centuries, spoken in the Royal Court and used to record the official records of the country. It was during this period that Scots migrated to Ulster, bringing their language with them. The importation and adaptation of the Scots language began in earnest with the large-scale settlements of the 17th century, including a Plantation scheme personally supervised by King James following the Union of the Crowns in 1603. Most of the people who came from lowland Scotland to settle in Ulster at this period spoke a version of Scots rather than English or (as in the Highlands and Islands) Gaelic. The first known use of the term Ulster Scots (for the people rather than their speech) dates from 1640. The Scottish settlers language has over the centuries slowly transmuted into a distinctive Ulster variety of Scots. The settlers also brought and developed their own distinctive cultural traditions, including literary and artistic idioms; religious and political ideals; practical skills such as building, farming and town planning; and forms of social and economic organization.

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Legislative context 2.7 Regional or minority languages and their accompanying cultural traditions are increasingly obvious in our day to day life. As a part of our rich cultural heritage they deserve recognition and protection in order to 8

preserve the languages for future generations. The importance our society places on preservation of our languages is reflected through the number of commitments given by Government to promoting, enhancing and developing the Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture 2.8 Ulster Scots is defined in UK legislation as the variety of the Scots language traditionally found in parts of Northern Ireland and Donegal (SI 859, 1999). The UK government in 2001 recognised and accorded it protected status under Part II of the European Charter for Regional and Minority Languages. NI Civil Service (NICS) Departmental guidance on the implementation of the Charter came into effect in 2005. The 1999 legislation also defines Ulster-Scots cultural issues as relating to the cultural traditions of the part of the population of Northern Ireland and the border counties which is of Scottish ancestry and the influence of their cultural traditions on others, both within the island of Ireland and in the rest of the world.

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The Good Friday Agreement 1998 2.10 The Good Friday Agreement was made with the endorsement of the participants in the multi-party negotiations to set out a plan for devolved government on a stable and inclusive basis.

all participants recognise the importance of respect, understanding and tolerance in relation to linguistic diversity, including in Northern Ireland the Irish language, Ulster-Scots and the languages of the various ethnic communities, all of which are a part of the cultural wealth of the Island of Ireland2.11 In 2003 the British and Irish Governments released a Joint Declaration as part of a move towards the re-establishment of devolution. The Governments specified that they intended to deliver and expand on the commitments given to both Ulster Scots and Irish within the Good Friday Agreement

The British Government. will also take steps to encourage support to be made available for an Ulster-Scots academy.2.12 Following the 2006 Agreement at St Andrews the UK Government passed legislation at Westminster to amend the Northern Ireland Act 1998 to build on the commitment under Rights, Safeguards and Equality of Opportunity. Section 28D of this Act includes the following:

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(2) The Executive Committee shall adopt a Strategy setting out how it proposes to enhance and develop the Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture.This Strategy is intended to meet this commitment International context The European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages 2.13 The European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages is an international convention designed to protect and promote regional and minority languages and contains detailed undertakings to support these languages. Its overriding purpose is to protect and promote regional or minority languages as a threatened aspect of Europes cultural heritage. The UK Government ratified the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages in March 2001. The UK has recognised obligations to protect and promote Ulster Scots and Irish. The Ulster Scots language has Part 2 status and Irish has Part 3 status. Status is indicative of how many articles under the Charter have been selected by the Government in respect of each language. Progress with the implementation of the Charter is measured every three years by a Committee of Experts (COMEX) from the Council of Europe. This Committee visited Belfast in September 2009 and made several recommendations in their report. Amongst these were to: Rationale 2.16 In an increasingly globalised society, there are many arguments for sustaining our cultural diversity. Linguistic variety, alternative forms of expression and local traditions all have an intrinsic value. They contribute to the quality of individual and community life throughout the island and further afield. Diversity opens up opportunities for choice, blending and experimentation. Heritage is a hugely important factor in marketing any region, whether as a place for international investment or as a tourist destination. adopt and implement a comprehensive Irish language policy, preferably through the adoption of legislation; adopt a strategy to enhance and develop Ulster Scots, in cooperation with the speakers.

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In a good relations context, it is vital that the historic linkages between Scotland and Ulster and their continuing legacy are accurately identified, properly understood and appropriately acknowledged. A secure, positive sense of belonging provides individuals with self-confidence and promotes community engagement. There is extensive public interest in the Ulster-Scots tradition and cultural issues. Respondents to the Omnibus Survey of April 2010 indicated that 49% agreed that Ulster Scots plays an important part in relation to history and heritage. In terms of the language, it is hard to estimate the number of people who speak Ulster Scots. There are few surveys on the topic and it was only in 2011 that the Census included questions on the language for the first time. The University of Aberdeen Scots Leid Quorum performed its own research in 1995, suggesting that there were as many as 2.7 million Scots speakers in Scotland. Numbers of Ulster Scots speakers in Ulster are harder to estimate, as there has been no substantive academic study of the subject since the work of Professor RJ Gregg in the early 1960s, but The Life and Times Survey of 1999 found that 2% of respondents said that they can speak Ulster Scots (this would equate to around 35,000 people) and 6% said that they knew someone who could. The Survey was based on a representative sample of 2,195 adults. It is anticipated that there will be more comprehensive data available on Ulster Scots usage following the 2011 Census.

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Benefits of Bilingualism 2.20 Bilingualism has numerous benefits, particularly for children. Bilingualism provides a greater sensitivity to the meaning and structure of language and stimulates creative thinking and flexibility of thought. It also improves employment options and can open up new career opportunities. Knowledge of another language provides a gateway to another culture. It can open up local sayings, customs, history, folk stories, music and poetry of other cultures. This cultural awareness can create links between people from all backgrounds, improve an individuals self-esteem and increase their cultural tolerance.

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Vision 2.22 In its Programme for Government 2011-15, published on March 12 2012 the Executive recognised the importance of local people setting priorities for the future and seizing the opportunity offered by devolution to build a

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shared and better future for all. This is reinforced under the priority of Building a Strong and Shared Community which focuses among other things on building relationships between communities and unlocking the potential of the culture sector as an instrument for positive change. 2.23 In the Programme for Government 2011-15 the Executive includes a Strategy for the Ulster Scots language heritage and culture as a key building block to deliver against the priority of Building a Strong and Shared Community.

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Part 3: Aims, Objectives and StakeholdersAIMS 3.1 This Strategy will aim to: create a framework where Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture can flourish and be shared and enjoyed by all; protect and support the development and learning of Ulster Scots language heritage and culture; and promote wider understanding and recognition of the Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture.

Consultation Questions What are your views on the Strategys aims? Are there other aims which you think the Strategy should include?OBJECTIVES 3.2 Increase educational provision of all aspects of Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture. Increase access to Ulster Scots language media including online material. Promote the economic benefits of Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture. Promote research in relation to the Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture.

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Consultation Questions What are your views on the Strategys objectives? Are there other objectives which you think the Strategy should include?STAKEHOLDERS 3.3 The development, implementation and monitoring of this Strategy will be taken forward in partnership with key stakeholders, including the Ulster Scots Agency and the Ministerial Advisory Group on the Ulster Scots Academy. The Ministerial Advisory Group on the Ulster Scots Academy was appointed by the Minister for Culture Arts and Leisure in March 2011. Its mission is to promote research, knowledge and understanding of Ulster Scots language, history and cultural traditions The Ministerial Advisory Group on the Ulster Scots Academy and the Ulster Scots Agency will work jointly where appropriate for example via the recently established Joint Task Force on Education and to develop the Ulster-Scots tourism offering. The Ulster Scots Agency is one of the two agencies which make up the North/South Language Body established as a result of the Belfast (Good Friday) Agreement 1998. (the other agency is Foras na Gaeilge). The aims of the Ulster Scots Agency are to promote the study, conservation, development, and use of Ulster Scots as a living language; to encourage and develop the full range of its attendant culture and to promote an understanding of the history of the Ulster Scots. Apart from DCAL, other NICS Departments also have policy responsibilities and interests which will make an important contribution to the development of Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture and the implementation of this Strategy, including the following: Department of Education: schools, curriculum development, early years. Department of Employment and Learning: higher and adult education, employment. Department of Enterprise, Trade and Investment: economic development, inward investment, tourism.

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Department of the Environment: the environment, local government, heritage, planning. Department of Social Development: support for the voluntary and community sector, neighbourhood renewal. Department of Agriculture and Rural Development: rural community development. Office of the First Minister and Deputy First Minister: good relations policies, equality, North/South and East/West cooperation, international representation.

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Responsibility for some public services, such as broadcasting, remains with the Government in Westminster. Engagement with the responsible Ministers in Westminster to seek cooperation from their Departments on the aims and objectives of this Strategy is critical. Consultation with stakeholders is important to the Strategy development process. It is important that this Strategy is developed in an iterative and reflective way, with every voice being listened to, particularly via public consultation.

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Part 4: Areas for Action EducationPre-Primary Appropriate provision in place to encourage and facilitate pre-primary education in Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture Actions 1a 1b 1c Promote Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture classes in preprimary education Develop and make available suitable materials for pre-primary education in Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture Support and encourage the community in uptake of Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture pre-primary projects

Primary Appropriate provision in place to encourage and facilitate primary education in Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture Actions 2a 2b 2c 2d Promote Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture classes in primary education Further develop and implement suitable Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture primary school teaching materials Support and encourage schools in uptake of Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture primary projects Support and encourage the Ulster- Scots accreditation scheme for primary schools

Secondary - Appropriate provision in place to encourage and facilitate secondary education in Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture Actions 3a Promote Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture classes in secondary education

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Develop and make available suitable materials for secondary education in Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture Support and encourage schools in uptake of Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture secondary projects

Further and Higher Education Appropriate provision in place to encourage and facilitate further and higher education in Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture Actions 4a 4b 4c 4d 4e 4f 4g Promote Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture qualifications in further and higher education Develop and make available suitable materials for further and higher education in Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture Support and encourage uptake of Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture further and higher education projects Develop and make available a Diploma in Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture studies Develop and make available a Degree in Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture studies Establish a Chair for Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture studies Develop the capacity for extra-mural studies of Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture

Teacher Training Development and implementation of an Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture teacher training course Actions 5a 5b 5c Develop and promote appropriate training for Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture teachers at each stage of the education process Develop and make available suitable training for Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture teachers Support and encourage teachers to train and teach Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture

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5d 5e

Support and encourage Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture Teachers Conferences Develop and promote appropriate in-service training for Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture teachers at each stage of the education process

Governor Training Develop a Ulster Scots language heritage and culture training course for school governors Actions 6a Develop and make available suitable materials to make school governors aware of the cultural rights of children and the associated benefits of the fulfilling of these rights Implement a training programme to promote the value the Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture to school governors and encourage governors to promote a holistic cultural ethos in schools in keeping with the culture of the children of that school

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Educational Assessment Establish a unit for educational assessment for Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture education Actions 7a Establish a unit in Council for the Curriculum, Examinations and Assessment (CCEA) to translate and provide curriculum guidance, examinations and assessment materials on Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture Develop a Key Stage 4 (or other accredited qualification) in Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture Develop an A-level in Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture

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Extra- curricular Develop appropriate extra-curricular support and resources Actions 8a Ensure support and resources for Ulster Scots language heritage and culture youth work and organisations including summer schemes/summer schools, after school clubs, drama projects, Award schemes

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Ensure support and resources for informal adult community based education in Ulster Scots language heritage and culture

International Language, Heritage and Culture Promotion Promotion of the Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture Actions 9a 9b Develop a feasibility study on the promotion of Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture in Scotland and North America Support and encourage the Ulster Scots Agency and other institutions to promote Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture throughout the island of Ireland Advance the work of the Ministerial Advisory Group Ulster Scots Academy by building strong working relationships with academic and research institutions and networks internationally which have a demonstrable interest in Ulster Scots, including the Scotch Irish and other traditions in the Ulster-Scots diaspora.

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Areas For Action Research and Development to contribute to building broad knowledge and understanding of Ulster-Scots traditions on the island of Ireland, Scotland and further afield Actions 10a Through the work of the Ministerial Advisory Group Ulster Scots Academy promote research and dissemination of Ulster Scots language, heritage and cultural traditions.

Consultation Questions What are your views on education as a key area for action within this Strategy? Are there other specific education related actions which this Strategy should include? If so, please specify how these link to the Strategys aims or objectives.

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MediaTelevision Increase the volume of Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture programming Actions 11a Develop creative potential within the Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture community to create/contribute to Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture programming. Support projects and initiatives with respect to increasing Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture programming. Development of a Media Training Scheme for Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture. Develop cooperation with the recently established Ulster Scots Language Broadcast Fund. Develop cooperation with established broadcasters to promote Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture.

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Radio Development of a dedicated Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture radio station Actions 12a 12b 12c Carry out a feasibility study on demand for a dedicated Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture radio station. Develop a business case to address the need for a dedicated Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture radio station. Develop cooperation with established broadcasters to promote Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture.

Newspapers & Periodicals Develop a sustainable strategy for the publication and distribution of an Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture newspaper and/or periodical Actions

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Review current Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture publications. Develop one or more community based Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture publications. Take forward steps to publish Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture sections in mainstream newspapers/periodicals making use of the online media as appropriate. Carry out an analysis of benefits and costs in the Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture publishing sector to move towards sustainability.

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Online Media Develop an innovative approach to the promotion of Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture Actions 14a 14b Develop the use of online media as a way to promote and raise awareness of Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture. Develop the use of online media as a means to open up global access to Ulster-Scots educational and promotional material, databases and archives. Develop an integrated communications strategy to promote Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture.

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Consultation Questions What are your views on the media as a key area for action within this Strategy? Are there other specific media related actions which this Strategy should include? If so, please specify how these link to the Strategys aims or objectives.

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Use of LanguageChanging Attitudes to Ulster Scots Language Raise the profile and promote the value of Ulster Scots language Actions 15a The Executive to promote the value of the Ulster Scots language in the context of the Programme for Government 2011-15 Priority 4 Building a Strong and Shared Community. The North/South Language Body to continue its language promotion work in Ulster Scots. Support projects which familiarise and stimulate interest from the public in Ulster Scots language. Encourage and support projects which progress the use of the Ulster Scots language in everyday life. Raise awareness of the benefits of bilingualism.

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Language Use in the Home Identify and put in place measures to encourage speaking of Ulster Scots in the home. Actions 16a 16b 16c Support projects which encourage speaking of Ulster Scots in the home. Provide advice and guidance for families wishing to use Ulster Scots in the home. Promote recognition of the use of the language in the home and in everyday life.

Inter-generational Use Identify and put in place measures to improve transmission of the Ulster Scots language between generations Actions 17a Support projects which encourage transmission of Ulster Scots language between generations.

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Raise awareness of the cultural value of the Ulster Scots language.

Language Standardisation Develop a road map for the standardisation of the written Ulster Scots language Actions 18a 18b 18c 18d Progress standardisation of the written Ulster Scots language. Drawing on best practice in Scotland and elsewhere as appropriate establish a standardisation committee for the Ulster Scots Language. Develop and publish an Ulster-Scots dictionary/glossary. Preserve, promote and advance knowledge and usage of the written Ulster Scots language.

Improvement of Charter Position - Part 3 Status for Ulster Scots Language Attain Part 3 Status for Ulster Scots Language under the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages Actions 19a 19b 19c Research and establish the number of articles Ulster Scots language has reached under the Charter. Subject to the outcome of this research develop a plan, to move towards Part 3 for Ulster Scots language. Monitor until Part 3 status for Ulster Scots language is achieved.

Consultation Questions What are your views on the use of language as a key area for action within this Strategy? Are there other specific uses of language related actions which this Strategy should include? If so, please specify how these link to the Strategys aims or objectives.

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Public ServicesDelivery of Public Services Analyse and review Ulster Scots language public service provision Actions 20a Where appropriate, public bodies to produce an Implementation Plan setting out how they will to contribute to the Aims, Objectives and Areas for Action in this Strategy. Public bodies to identify what public services can be delivered in the Ulster Scots language. Where demand has been demonstrated, public bodies to implement services in the Ulster Scots language. Develop translation standards for Ulster Scots language. Refresh/Revise NICS Codes of Courtesy (including procedures for dealing with oral and written correspondence in the Ulster Scots language etc). Implementation of a Ulster Scots Language Skills Survey for NICS staff. NICS training programmes for staff dealing with Ulster Scots language services/queries/front line personnel.

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Consultation Questions What are your views on public services as key areas for action within the Strategy? Are there other public service related actions which this Strategy might include? If so, please specify how these link to the Strategys aims or objectives.

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CultureCultural Activities - Enhance and develop Ulster Scots language, heritage and cultural tourism offering Actions 21a 21b Mainstream Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture into our cultural fabric e.g. libraries, museums and festivals etc. Enhance and develop the Ulster Scots language, heritage and cultural tourism offering eg heritage walking tours, an Ulster Scots trail, develop and market an Ulster Scots events calendar, develop genealogical links with USA. Develop the Ulster-Scots contribution to cultural tourism on the island of Ireland. Promote Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture representation on appropriate cultural bodies. Develop Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture influenced creative industries. Enhance, promote and advance knowledge and understanding of the Ulster-Scots contribution to the creative arts, including the visual arts and architecture. Develop an archive of Ulster Scots literature.

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Cultural Centres Develop sustainable Ulster Scots language, heritage and cultural centres Actions 20a 20b 20c Develop feasibility studies for a number of Ulster Scots language, heritage and cultural centres with input from relevant NICS Departments. Prepare business cases for a number of Ulster Scots language, heritage and cultural centres with input from relevant NICS Departments. Secure funding for sustainable Ulster Scots language, heritage and cultural centres (subject to business case approval).

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20d 20e

Pilot Heritage Heartlands as partnerships between district councils, schools and local communities. Identify and support accredited Ulster-Scots resource and cultural centres for students, researchers, visitors and enthusiasts.

Consultation Questions What are your views on culture as a key area for action within the Strategy? Are there other culture related actions which this Strategy might include? If so please specify how these link to the Strategys aims or objectives Other Areas for Action Are there other specific areas for action which this Strategy should include? If so, please specify how these link to the Strategys aims or objectives.

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Part 5: Implementation, Monitoring and AccountabilityIMPLEMENTATION 5.1 The aims, objectives and associated areas for action in this Strategy have implications for all NICS Departments and their sponsored bodies, local government, the business sector and all our people. Each NICS Department will be required draw up an Implementation Plan setting out how it intends to contribute to the aims, objectives and areas for action set out in and arising from this Strategy. These Plans will include specific and measurable targets to demonstrate progress against the aims of the Strategy. An Interdepartmental Strategy Delivery Group (ISDG) will be established including senior officials from all NICS Departments to ensure effective communication and good practice. A Strategy Unit within the Department of Culture, Arts and Leisure will be established with dedicated staff to drive forward the implementation of this Strategy and provide administrative support to the ISDG. This Unit will work with the Secretariat to the Ministerial Advisory Group Ulster Scots Academy and the Ulster Scots Agency.

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MONITORING AND ACCOUNTABILITY 5.5 The ISDG will be responsible for overseeing the strategic planning process and monitoring the development of resources. The ISDG will also be responsible for ensuring that each NICS Department remains aware of the commitments it gives to deliver this Strategy, and for communicating its progress on the aims, objectives and areas for action. It will: (i) meet regularly to monitor implementation of the Strategy and tackle any obstacles to achievement as they arise (ii) report annually to the Executive on the progress of the Strategy (iii) ensure that each Departments actions are linked to the aims and objectives of the Strategy. 5.6 The Strategy Unit within the Department of Culture Arts and Leisure will monitor cross-departmental implementation of initiatives; provide expert advice; oversee operational plans as developed by the implementation

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bodies; and publish updates and relevant documentation for public information. 5.7 The Ulster Scots Agency and the Ministerial Advisory Group on the Ulster Scots Academy will be invited to advise both the ISDG and the Strategy Unit as required. The Ulster Scots Agency will continue to deliver on its statutory responsibilities on an all-Ireland basis, reporting to the North/South Ministerial Council.

The European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages 5.8 The monitoring and evaluation process in relation to this Strategy will reflect the reporting cycle of the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages. The Charter requires the UK to submit a report on its implementation of the Charter every three years. Appropriate input to this report must be agreed by the Executive. DCAL chairs and provides a secretariat for the Interdepartmental Charter Implementation Group (ICIG) comprised of representatives of all NICS Departments and the UK Departments operating in NI. The ICIG oversees Charter implementation and coordinates input to periodical reports on progress to the Council of Europe. The ICIG has issued guidance on the Charter to all public bodies. A copy of the current guidance is available on the DCAL internet site www.dcalni.gov.uk/languages

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Public Bodies 5.10 NICS Departments will be responsible for communicating this Strategys aims and objectives in relation to the Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture to the public bodies which they support. Each Department will be responsible for ensuring that its sponsored bodies work effectively towards delivery of the aims and objectives of this Strategy.

Review and Revision 5.11 In line with Section 28 D of the amended Northern Ireland Act 1998 where the Executive considers it appropriate, this Strategy can be reviewed, revised or replaced.

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Part 6: Equality Impact Assessment (EQIA)

DEPARTMENT OF CULTURE, ARTS AND LEISURE

EQUALITY IMPACT ASSESSMENT

STRATEGY FOR ULSTER SCOTS LANGUAGE, HERITAGE AND CULTURE

JULY 2012

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Introduction Under section 75 of the NI Act 1998 (the Act) the Department of Culture, Arts and Leisure (DCAL), in carrying out its functions is required to have due regard to the need to promote equality of opportunity: between persons of different religious belief, political opinion, racial group, age, marital status or sexual orientation; between men and women generally; between persons with a disability and persons without; and between persons with dependants and persons without.

In addition, without prejudice to its obligations above, DCAL shall, in carrying out its functions have regard to the desirability of promoting good relations between persons of different religious belief, political opinion or racial group. DCALs Equality Scheme commits the Department to assess how policy proposals impact on the promotion of equality of opportunity within the terms of Section 75 of the Act. The legislation requires public authorities to conduct an Equality Impact Assessment (EQIA) where a proposed policy is likely to have an impact on equality of opportunity. In response to this, the Department has decided that this draft Strategy requires an EQIA. The purpose of this document is to record the findings of the EQIA and invite comments. Seeking Your Views The Department of Culture, Arts and Leisure has decided to carry out an Equality Impact Assessment on the draft Strategy for the Ulster Scots language heritage and culture. You are invited to give your views on this assessment. The purpose of the consultation is to obtain: Your views on this assessment of the equality impacts of the draft Strategy; and Any further information which could be useful in assessing those equality impacts.

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When considering your response, the following consultation questions should be addressed:

Do you have any views on any of the aspects of equality covered in this draft EQIA? Are there any other equality issues that have not been addressed? If so, what are these?

DCAL would also welcome any additional information and comments that you feel would help inform the equality considerations of the draft Strategy. We would like to receive your comments by 5:00pm on Tuesday 27 November 2012. You can contact us by writing to us at the address below or by: Email: [email protected] Telephone: 028 9051 5057 Textphone: 028 9052 7668 Language Strategies Team Department of Culture, Arts and Leisure Level 7 Causeway Exchange 1-7 Bedford Street Belfast BT2 7EG Should you require this document in an alternative format, please contact the above address. Policy background In its Programme for Government 2011-15, published on March 12 2012, the Executive recognised the importance of local people setting priorities for the future and seizing the opportunity offered by devolution to deliver a shared and better future for all our . This is reinforced under Priority 4 Building a Strong and Shared Community which focuses among other things on building relationships between communities and unlocking the potential of the culture sector as an instrument

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for positive change. Under this Priority specific reference is made to the a Strategy for the Ulster Scots language heritage and culture Strategy as a Building Block Policy Aim The policy aim is to introduce a Strategy for Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture in accordance with the Programme for Government 2011-15. Policy Delivery DCAL officials have prepared this EQIA for publication. The Department will also be collating and considering the responses, issuing a summary of responses, and providing the Minister for Culture, Arts and Leisure with appropriate briefing and information to make an informed policy decision on the nature of the Strategy. This decision can only be made after the consultation period and the due consideration of the responses received during that time. Consideration of Available Data and Research In relation to the Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture, DCAL has information available from modules in both the 2007 and 2010 Omnibus Survey and the NI Life and Times Survey 1999. Data from 2011 Census is not available at this time. Assessment of Impacts Equality Detail of the differences for each Section 75 group is provided in the text and tables below. The main differences are summarised under three headings related to knowledge of the language, education and culture. There are differences between groups under age, religion and marital status.

Knowledge of the language: There are differences in knowledge of the language in the following groups: People who are 16-24 and people aged 65 and over People from the Catholic and people from the Protestant community People who are single and people who are married/cohabiting People who are single and people who are divorced/separated/widowed

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Education: There are differences in attitude to education and Ulster-Scots in the following groups: People aged 55-64 and over and people aged 25-34 People aged 55-64 and over and people aged 35-44 People aged 55-64 and over and people aged 65 and over People from the Catholic and people from the Protestant community People who are divorced/separated/widowed and people who are married/cohabiting

Culture: There are differences in attitude to Ulster-Scots culture in the following groups: People aged 16-24 and all other age groups People aged 25-34 and people aged 65 and over People aged 55-64 and all other age groups (except 65 and over) People from the Catholic and people from the Protestant community People who are single and people who are married/cohabiting People who are single and people who are divorced/separated/widowed

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Age

Knowledge of the language: An Omnibus survey was carried out in 2007 thatincluded questions on knowledge of Ulster Scots. Table 1 shows that in 2007, older respondents were more likely to have some knowledge of Ulster Scots with 6% of respondents aged 65 and over saying they had some knowledge of Ulster Scots compared to 1% of 16-24 year old respondents (NI Omnibus Survey, 2007). In the 2010 Omnibus Survey, respondents were about whether they perceived themselves to be an Ulster Scot. Table 2 shows that the proportions of respondents perceiving themselves to be an Ulster Scot increased with age: 5% of those aged 16-24 years compared with 29% of those aged 65 and over (NI Omnibus Survey, 2010).

Education: In the 2010 Omnibus Survey, respondents were asked about theirviews on whether learning about Ulster-Scots traditions in the school curriculum has educational benefits for children at school. Table 4 shows that agreement with this statement was highest in the 55-64 age group (60%) and lowest among 25-34 year old respondents (43%). (NI Omnibus Survey, 2010).

Culture: Table 5 shows that agreement with the statement Ulster Scots is avaluable part of the culture of NI was highest in the 55-64 year old age group (56% of respondents in this group agreed with the statement) and lowest in the 16-24 year old age group (28%) (NI Omnibus Survey, 2010).

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Gender

Knowledge of the language: Table 1 shows that in 2007, there was nodifference between male and female respondents in their knowledge of Ulster Scots (NI Omnibus Survey, 2007). Table 2 shows that similar proportions of male and female respondents perceived themselves to be an Ulster Scot (20% and 16% respectively) (NI Omnibus Survey, 2010).

Education: In the 2010 Omnibus Survey, respondents were asked about theirviews on whether learning about Ulster-Scots traditions in the school curriculum has educational benefits for children at school. Table 4 shows that similar proportions of males and females agreed with this statement (NI Omnibus Survey, 2010).

Culture: Table 5 shows that similar proportions of male and female respondentsagreed that Ulster Scots is a valuable part of the of Northern Irish culture (NI Omnibus Survey, 2010). Religious belief

Knowledge of the language: Table 1 shows that in 2007, there was nodifference between Catholic and Protestant respondents in their knowledge of Ulster Scots (NI Omnibus Survey, 2007). Table 2 shows that over 10 times the proportion of Protestant respondents (31%) compared with Catholic respondents (3%) considered themselves to be Ulster Scots (NI Omnibus Survey, 2010).

Education: Table 4 shows that 58% of Protestant respondents agreed with thestatement Learning about Ulster-Scots traditions in the school curriculum has educational benefits for children at school in NI compared with 35% of Catholic respondents. (NI Omnibus Survey, 2012).

Culture: Table 5 shows that when respondents were asked if they thought thatUlster Scots was a valuable part of the Northern Irish culture, 55% of Protestant respondents and 31% of Catholic respondents agreed with the statement (NI Omnibus Survey, 2012).

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Marital status

Knowledge of the language: Table 1 shows that in the 2007 Omnibus Survey,there were some differences between marital status groups and their knowledge of Ulster Scots (NI Omnibus Survey, 2007). Differences include: Single and married/cohabiting (2% and 5% respectively)

Table 2 shows that there were differences between marital groups and whether they were more likely to perceive themselves to be an Ulster Scot (NI Omnibus Survey, 2010). Differences include: Single and married/cohabiting (11% and 22% respectively) Single and divorced/separated/widowed (11% and 17% respectively)

Education: In the 2010 Omnibus Survey, respondents were asked about theirviews on whether learning about Ulster-Scots traditions in the school curriculum has educational benefits for children at school. Table 4 shows that respondents who are married (51%) are more likely to agree with this statement than respondents who were divorced/separated/ widowed (42%) (NI Omnibus Survey, 2010).

Culture: Table 5 shows that single respondents (38%) were less likely to agreethat Ulster Scots is a valuable part of the culture of NI than other marital status groups (NI Omnibus Survey, 2010).

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Disability

Knowledge of the language: Table 1 shows that in the 2007 Omnibus Survey,there was no difference between people with and without disabilities and their knowledge of Ulster Scots (NI Omnibus Survey, 2007). Table 2 shows that similar proportions of respondents with and without a disability perceived themselves to be an Ulster Scot (20% and 17% respectively) (NI Omnibus Survey, 2010).

Education: In the 2010 Omnibus Survey, respondents were about their viewson whether learning about Ulster-Scots traditions in the school curriculum has educational benefits for children at school. Table 4 shows that similar proportions of respondents with and without disabilities agreed with this statement (NI Omnibus Survey, 2010).

Culture: Table 5 shows that similar proportions of respondents with and withoutdisabilities agreed that Ulster Scots is a valuable part of the culture of Northern Irish (NI Omnibus Survey, 2010). Dependants

Knowledge of the language: Table 1 shows that in the 2007 Omnibus Survey,there was no difference between people with and without dependants and their knowledge of Ulster Scots (NI Omnibus Survey, 2007). Table 2 shows that similar proportions of respondents with and without dependants perceived themselves to be an Ulster Scot (17% and 19% respectively) (NI Omnibus Survey, 2010).

Education: In the 2010 Omnibus Survey, respondents were about their viewson whether learning about Ulster-Scots traditions in the school curriculum has educational benefits for children at school. Table 4 shows that similar proportions of respondents with and without dependants agreed with this statement (NI Omnibus Survey, 2010).

Culture: Table 5 shows that similar proportions of respondents with and withoutdependants agreed that Ulster Scots is a valuable part of the NI culture (NI Omnibus Survey, 2010).

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Racial Group

Knowledge of the language: No data available Education: No data available Culture: No data availablePolitical Opinion

Knowledge of the language: In the 1999 NI Life and Times Survey,respondents were asked if they spoke Ulster Scots. Table 3 shows that similar proportions of nationalist and unionist respondents spoke Ulster Scots (NI Life and Times Survey, 1999).

Culture: No data available Education: No data availableSexual Orientation

Knowledge of the language: No data available Culture: No data available Education: No data availableConclusions The data indicate that those speaking and possessing some knowledge of Ulster Scots are more likely to be Protestant, married-cohabiting-divorced-separatedwidowed and older. There were no significant differentials in relation to disability, dependants, political opinion and gender. No data is available in relation to sexual orientation and racial group. It is DCALs view that bringing forward an Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture Strategy will have a positive impact on Ulster-Scots users and therefore indirectly on Protestants, married/divorced/widowed/separated people and older people which are the groups most likely to speak Ulster-Scots. In DCALs view, there are no adverse impacts.

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Assessment of impact on good relations DCAL considers that the introduction of an Ulster Scots language, heritage and culture Strategy has the potential to improve good relations, as it will potentially give Ulster Scots a more accessible platform for all sections of the community. Publication This Equality Impact Assessment (EQIA) will be completed, taking into account the outcome of the public consultation. Any resulting amendments to the Strategy will then be made. The general public will be informed of the availability of the EQIA through a press release. The results will also be published on the DCAL website (www.dcalni.gov.uk). Monitoring for adverse impact in the future and publication of results of monitoring The impact of the Strategy will continue to be monitored by the DCAL to identify any unforeseen results and to ensure that the aim is being achieved. Reviews will be conducted at key stages and results will be analysed to determine whether or not its impact on any of the nine categories has significantly changed.

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Table 1: Number of people who speak Ulster Scots language in Northern Ireland 2007 Percentage of respondentsProfile of respondent

Has No Knowledge of Ulster Scots 96 96 96 99 96 96 96 94 97 95 98 95 97 95 96 96 96

Has Some Knowledge of Ulster Scots 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 6 3 5 2 5 3 5 4 4 4

Base

All Male Female Aged 16 - 24 Aged 25 - 34 Aged 35 - 49 Aged 50 - 64 Aged 65 and over Catholic Protestant Single Married / Cohabiting Divorced / Separated/ Widowed Has disability Has no disability With dependants No dependantsSource: NI Omnibus Survey 2007

1,211 514 697 130 204 345 244 288 473 663 373 559 279 278 933 434 777

1. Having some knowledge of Ulster Scots includes any of the following answer options from the Omnibus Survey understanding Ulster Scots, speaking Ulster Scots, reading Ulster Scots or writing Ulster Scots. 2. Disability is defined as having a limiting long-term illness covers any long-term illness, health problem or disability which limits daily activities or work. 3. Respondents in the survey are asked to answer yes or no if they have any dependants.

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Table 2: Do you perceive yourself to be an Ulster Scot? Percentage of respondentsProfile of respondent

Yes All respondents Male Female Aged 16-24 Aged 25-34 Aged 35-44 Aged 45-54 Aged 55-64 Aged 65+ Catholic Protestant Single Married / Cohabiting Divorced / Separated/ Widowed Has disability Has no disability With dependants No dependantsSource: NI Omnibus Survey 2010

No 80 77 83 91 86 84 79 75 70 96 67 86 77 82 77 81 81 79

Dont know / refusal 2 2 1 3 2 2 3 1 1 1 2 3 2 1 4 2 2 2

Base

18 20 16 5 12 14 18 23 29 3 31 11 22 17 20 17 17 19

1,212 530 682 104 197 222 199 172 318 495 625 358 572 282 283 929 455 757

1. Disability is defined as having a limiting long-term illness covers any long-term illness, health problem or disability which limits daily activities or work. 2. Respondents in the survey are asked to answer yes or no if they have any dependants.

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Table 3: Number of people who speak Ulster Scots language in Northern Ireland 1999 Percentage of respondentsProfile of respondent

Yes Total Male Female 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65 and over Single (never married) Married/Living as married Separated Divorced Widowed Catholic Protestant No religion Unionist Nationalist Neither Has disability Has no disabilitySource: NI Life and Time Survey 1999 1.

No 86 89 83 85 87 84 88 88 83 83 88 77 88 83 89 86 80 86 90 82 83 86

(Never heard of it / What's that?) 12 9 15 14 12 15 10 10 12 16 10 21 12 14 10 12 18 11 8 16 15 12

Base

2 2 2 1 1 2 2 2 4 1 2 3 1 3 1 2 2 2 2 1 3 2

2,195 935 1,260 243 439 443 351 291 417 605 1,113 122 109 246 828 1,069 220 870 598 669 393 1,800

Disability is defined as having any long standing health problems or disabilities which limit what can be done at work, at home or in leisure time. Long standing is defined as: had problem for 3 years or more, or expect problem to last for 3 years or more.

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Table 4: How much do you agree or disagree with the following statement ... Learning about Ulster-Scots traditions in the school curriculum has educational benefits for children at school in Northern Ireland?Level of agreement Profile of respondent Strongly agree Neither agree nor disagree 29 26 31 29 33 34 28 24 26 34 25 Strongly disagree Dont know / refusal 2 2 3 3 3 2 2 2 4 3 1 Base

Agree

Disagree

All respondents Male Female Aged 16-24 Aged 25-34 Aged 35-44 Aged 45-54 Aged 55-64 Aged 65+ Catholic Protestant

7 8 7 9 5 7 8 9 6 3 10

41 40 41 39 38 38 40 51 40 32 48

15 15 14 17 12 14 14 11 18 18 13

6 8 4 3 9 4 8 3 7 9 4

1,212 530 682 104 197 222 199 172 318 495 625

Single Married / Cohabiting Divorced / Separated/ Widowed Has disability Has no disability With dependants No dependants

7 8 7 8 7 6 8

39 43 35 44 40 41 40

31 28 29 23 30 33 27

15 13 20 13 15 13 16

6 6 5 8 5 6 6

2 2 4 5 2 2 3

358 572 282 283 929 455 757

Source: NI Omnibus Survey 2010 1. 2. Disability is defined as having a limiting long-term illness covers any long-term illness, health problem or disability which limits daily activities or work. Respondents in the survey are asked to answer yes or no if they have any dependants.

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Table 5: How much do you agree or disagree with the following statement Ulster Scots is a valuable part of the culture of Northern Ireland?Percentage of respondents Profile of respondent Strongly agree Neither agree nor disagree 35 31 38 45 40 36 36 29 27 40 30 38 35 29 34 35 38 33 Strongly disagree Dont know / refusal 5 4 5 11 4 6 4 1 3 6 3 8 3 5 5 4 4 5 Base

Agree

Disagree

All respondents Male Female Aged 16-24 Aged 25-34 Aged 35-44 Aged 45-54 Aged 55-64 Aged 65+ Catholic Protestant Single Married / Cohabiting Divorced / Separated/ Widowed Has disability Has no disability With dependants No dependants

10 10 10 9 8 10 11 11 10 4 15 10 10 9 13 9 8 11

33 33 34 19 32 31 31 45 39 27 40 28 35 37 32 34 35 33

10 12 9 13 7 12 7 9 13 13 8 11 10 13 8 11 8 12

6 9 4 3 8 4 11 4 7 9 4 5 7 7 8 6 6 7

1,212 530 682 104 197 222 199 172 318 495 625 358 572 282 283 929 455 757

Source: NI Omnibus Survey 2010 1. 2. Disability is defined as having a limiting long-term illness covers any long-term illness, health problem or disability which limits daily activities or work. Respondents in the survey are asked to answer yes or no if they have any dependants.

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Part 7: Consultation QuestionsPART 3: AIMS, OBJECTIVES AND STAKEHOLDERS 3.1 Aims of the Strategy What are your views on the Strategys aims? Are there other aims which you think the Strategy should include? 3.2 Specific Objectives of the Strategy What are your views on the Strategys objectives? Are there other objectives which you think the Strategy should include?

PART 4: AREAS FOR ACTION 4.1 Education What are your views on education as a key area for action within this Strategy? Are there other specific education related actions which this Strategy should include? If so, please specify how these link to the Strategys aims or objectives. 4.2 Media What are your views on the media as a key area for action within this Strategy? Are there other specific media related actions which this Strategy should include? If so, please specify how these link to the Strategys aims or objectives. 4.3 Use of language What are your views on the use of language as a key area for action within this Strategy? Are there other specific uses of language related actions which this Strategy should include? If so please specify how these link to the Strategys aims or objectives. 45

4.4 Public Services What are your views on public services as key areas for action within the Strategy? Are there other public service related actions which this Strategy might include? If so, please specify how these link to the Strategys aims or objectives. 4.5 Culture What are your views on culture as a key area for action within the Strategy? Are there other culture related actions which this Strategy might include? If so, please specify how these link to the Strategys aims or objectives. Other areas for action Are there other specific areas for action which this Strategy should include? If so, please specify how these link to the Strategys aims or objectives.

PART 6: EQUALITY IMPACT ASSESSMENT (EQIA) Do you have any views on any of the aspects of equality covered in this draft EQIA? Are there any other equality issues that have not been addressed? If so, what are these?

ANY OTHER COMMENTS Please provide any other comments you have on the Strategy.

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