Self-Esteem and Student Achievement. Objectives Define self-esteem and the relationship between self-esteem and academic achievement. Discover how self-esteem

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  • Self-Esteem and Student Achievement

  • ObjectivesDefine self-esteem and the relationship between self-esteem and academic achievement.

    Discover how self-esteem is developed

    Understand the important role of parents self-esteem in the development of their childs self-esteem.

    Identify specific ways parents can build their childs self-esteem.Self-Esteem & Student AchievementChanging the Way We Do Business in the Village through Parent/Family Empowerment | Raising Achievement & Closing GapsPUBLIC SCHOOLS OF NORTH CAROLINA State Board of Education | Department of Public InstructionSE 2

  • What is Self-Esteem?

    Its a word we use to describe howwe feel about ourselves.

    Self-esteem and its relationship to Academic AchievementSelf-Esteem & Student AchievementChanging the Way We Do Business in the Village through Parent/Family Empowerment | Raising Achievement & Closing GapsPUBLIC SCHOOLS OF NORTH CAROLINA State Board of Education | Department of Public InstructionSE 3

  • How is Self-Esteem Developed?Self-Esteem & Student AchievementChanging the Way We Do Business in the Village through Parent/Family Empowerment | Raising Achievement & Closing GapsPUBLIC SCHOOLS OF NORTH CAROLINA State Board of Education | Department of Public InstructionSE 4

  • Activity

    Ways Parents Can Build Their Own Self-EsteemSelf-Esteem & Student AchievementChanging the Way We Do Business in the Village through Parent/Family Empowerment | Raising Achievement & Closing GapsPUBLIC SCHOOLS OF NORTH CAROLINA State Board of Education | Department of Public InstructionSE 5

  • Self-Esteem andAcademic Achievement When self-esteem is high, children learn and retain more.

    Children with a high self-esteem are able to cope more creatively with life.

    Self-Esteem & Student AchievementChanging the Way We Do Business in the Village through Parent/Family Empowerment | Raising Achievement & Closing GapsPUBLIC SCHOOLS OF NORTH CAROLINA State Board of Education | Department of Public InstructionSE 6

  • Elements of Building Self-EsteemA Key Factor in Student AchievementA. SecurityB. IdentityC. BelongingD. PurposeE. Competence

    Self-Esteem & Student AchievementChanging the Way We Do Business in the Village through Parent/Family Empowerment | Raising Achievement & Closing GapsPUBLIC SCHOOLS OF NORTH CAROLINA State Board of Education | Department of Public InstructionSE 7

  • Why is Self-Esteem Important? How a child feels about himself/herself will impact his/her outlook on life.

    A childs success or failure may be contingent upon personal self-esteem.

    Self-Esteem & Student AchievementChanging the Way We Do Business in the Village through Parent/Family Empowerment | Raising Achievement & Closing GapsPUBLIC SCHOOLS OF NORTH CAROLINA State Board of Education | Department of Public InstructionSE 8

  • Maslows Hierarchy of NeedsSense of Belonging to a Group, Acceptance of Other People, Love and AffectionSelf-Esteem & Student AchievementProtection from Physical Harm, Freedom from Anxiety and FearAchievement of Independence, Self-Esteem, Recognition, Confidence, Deserved RespectSELF-FULFILLMENT NEEDS

    EGO NEEDS

    SOCIAL NEEDS

    SECURITY NEEDS

    PHYSIOLOGICAL NEEDS Food, Shelter, Clothing, SleepSense of Accomplishment, Sense of Achievement at Full Capacity, New Challenges, Broadening of Horizons of Interest/Self-ActualizationChanging the Way We Do Business in the Village through Parent/Family Empowerment | Raising Achievement & Closing GapsPUBLIC SCHOOLS OF NORTH CAROLINA State Board of Education | Department of Public InstructionSE 9

  • Activity

    Saving DannySelf-Esteem & Student AchievementChanging the Way We Do Business in the Village through Parent/Family Empowerment | Raising Achievement & Closing GapsPUBLIC SCHOOLS OF NORTH CAROLINA State Board of Education | Department of Public InstructionSE 10

  • Self-Esteem & Student AchievementChanging the Way We Do Business in the Village through Parent/Family Empowerment | Raising Achievement & Closing GapsPUBLIC SCHOOLS OF NORTH CAROLINA State Board of Education | Department of Public InstructionSE 11Ways Parents Can Build Self-Esteem In Their Children Understanding and accepting our childrens learning problems and demystifyingTeaching children how to solve problems and make decisionsReinforcing responsibility by having children contributeLearning from rather than feeling defeated by mistakesSpecial needs or feeling special

  • Ways I Can Help My Child Build Self-EsteemSelf-Esteem & Student AchievementChanging the Way We Do Business in the Village through Parent/Family Empowerment | Raising Achievement & Closing GapsPUBLIC SCHOOLS OF NORTH CAROLINA State Board of Education | Department of Public InstructionSE 12

  • Take-home Activity

    Building Self-ConfidenceSelf-Esteem & Student AchievementChanging the Way We Do Business in the Village through Parent/Family Empowerment | Raising Achievement & Closing GapsPUBLIC SCHOOLS OF NORTH CAROLINA State Board of Education | Department of Public InstructionSE 13

  • Children Learn What They Live By Dorothy Law Nolte, Ph.D. If children live with criticism, they learn to condemn. If children live with hostility, they learn to fight. If children live with fear, they learn to be apprehensive. If children live with pity, they learn to feel sorry for themselves. If children live with ridicule, they learn to feel shy. If children live with jealousy, they learn to feel envy. If children live with shame, they learn to feel guilty. If children live with encouragement, they learn confidence. If children live with tolerance, they learn patience. If children live with praise, they learn appreciation. If children live with acceptance, they learn to love. If children live with approval, they learn to like themselves. If children live with recognition, they learn it is good to have a goal. If children live with sharing, they learn generosity. If children live with honesty, they learn truthfulness. If children live with fairness, they learn justice. If children live with kindness and consideration, they learn respect. If children live with security,they learn to have faith in themselves and in those about them. If children live with friendliness, they learn the world is a nice place in which to live.

    *Opening Narrative (Slide SE 1)As participants arrive, have them write their name on a name tag. After participants aresettled, welcome them to the training. Explain that what they will learn today will helptheir children succeed in the classroom.ActivityIntroduce yourself and share some things about your background. Then, have participantsintroduce themselves and share the number of children in their family. Participants canshare at their tables if the group is small in number.*Changing the Way We Do Business in the Village Through Parent/Family EmpowermentRaising Achievement and Closing Gaps Section PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF NORTH CAROLINA State Board of Education | Department of Public InstructionInform participants that we will be discussing self-esteem in this module.Tell participants that these are the objectives for this session. Then read the objectivesto the audience.SE 2*Changing the Way We Do Business in the Village Through Parent/Family EmpowermentRaising Achievement and Closing Gaps Section PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF NORTH CAROLINA State Board of Education | Department of Public InstructionNarrative (Slide SE 3)Review the definition of self-esteem and explain that how we feel about ourselvesinfluences our actions towards others. Also by the time children reach school age, theirself-esteem is well formed and their desire and ability to learn is already established.SE 3

    *ActivityPair the participants and have them discuss how self-esteem is developed by asking oneanother Why is it some people feel pretty good about themselves, while others dont seem tolike themselves at all? Allow time for discussion. Call time, then move to the next narration.

    Narrative (Slide SE 4)Explain that self-esteem is learned.We develop our self esteem as a result of how peoplereact to us. The first place children develop self-esteem is at HOME. It is the home wherechildren should learn they are special, important people capable of learning.*Changing the Way We Do Business in the Village Through Parent/Family EmpowermentRaising Achievement and Closing Gaps Section PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF NORTH CAROLINA State Board of Education | Department of Public InstructionSE 4Narrative (Slide SE 5)Inform participants that this is an activity that helps parents build their own self-esteem.Explain that unless parents have a strong sense of self-worth, then it will be difficult forthem to instill this same attitude into their children.ActivityPair the participants. Pass to each participant two 3 x 5 index cards. Allow participantstime to think of one thing they have experienced during the week that indicates they arelovable. Then, they are to write the experience on an index card.Next, have participants think of one thing they did during the week that indicates they arecapable. Have them record that experience on the other index card. Have participantsshare their experiences with their partner. Each partner is to take turns speaking for 30seconds about his/her qualities.Reconvene for whole group discussion. Ask participants if recalling these experiencesand sharing them is easy. Why or why not? Note to participants that it is important thatparents help their children learn how to assess their capabilities and lovable qualities.This is how self-esteem is built.NarrativeWhen a parent has low self-esteem, his/her behaviors are ob