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29 August 2013 Tesoro Savage Vancouver Energy Distribution Terminal Submitted to State of Washington Energy Facility Siting Evaluation Council Olympia, Washington APPLICATION FOR SITE CERTIFICATION AGREEMENT NO. 2013-01 VOLUME 2 - APPENDICES

EFSEC 2013-01 Compiled Volume II

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  • 29 August 2013

    Tesoro SavageVancouver Energy Distribution Terminal

    Submitted toState of Washington

    Energy Facility Siting Evaluation CouncilOlympia, Washington

    APPLICATION FOR SITE CERTIFICATION AGREEMENTNO. 2013-01

    VOLUME 2 - APPENDICES

  • Volume 2 - Appendices Application for Site Certification Agreement No. 2013-01

    Tesoro Savage Vancouver Energy Distribution Terminal Submitted to State of Washington Energy Facility Siting Evaluation Council Olympia, Washington 29 August 2013

  • Archaeological Investigations Northwest, Inc.

    3510 N.E. 122nd Ave. Portland, Oregon 97230 Vancouver Phone (360) 696-7473 Phone (503) 761-6605 Fax (503) 761-6620 E-mail: [email protected]

    Web: www.ainw.com

    August 20, 2013 Richard Bellon, THPO Confederated Tribes of the Chehalis Indian Reservation P.O. Box 536 Oakville WA 98568 Re: Tesoro Savage Vancouver Energy Distribution Terminal Project Vancouver, Washington Cultural Resource Information Request Dear Mr. Bellon: I am writing to provide you with information and a request to initiate coordination regarding the Tesoro Savage Vancouver Energy Distribution Terminal that is proposed to be located at the Port of Vancouver (Port) in Vancouver, Washington (Figures 1 and 2, attached). The proposed facility will receive crude oil by freight rail, temporarily store it on site, and pipe it to marine vessels for shipment via the Columbia River.

    The proposed project is subject to the jurisdiction of the Washington State Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council (EFSEC) since the project is expected to ship over 50,000 barrels of crude oil per day over marine waters. In support of the application to EFSEC, AINW is preparing an analysis of potential impacts to cultural resources in accordance with applicable state statutes and regulations. For purposes of the EFSEC application, the proposed study area will be the area where construction impacts may occur at the Port, as illustrated in the attached figures.

    The project may also require approval from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) for potential in-water work on the existing Port Berths 13 and 14 which will be used to support the marine activities related to the project. For purposes of supporting review by the USACE, a separate cultural resources study meeting the requirements of Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (as amended) and its implementing regulations, 36 CFR 800, will be prepared. The standards of the Washington State Department of Archaeology and Historic Preservation will be followed, and the cultural resource study will be directed by AINW staff who have met the professional qualifications of the Secretary of the Interiors Standards and Guidelines for Archaeology and Historic Preservation. Based on the currently proposed project impacts, my review of previous studies indicate that nearly the entire study area has been previously surveyed for archaeological resources (Figure 3, attached) and none have been identified within the study area; from 1.2 to 6 meters (4 to 20 feet) of dredge fill deposits cover most of the APE and the small portions not previously surveyed are paved and are on the filled area. The applicant is very interested to learn whether you have information regarding properties, features, or materials within the study area that may be of concern to the Chehalis Tribes so that these concerns can be addressed in the cultural resources review included in the application to EFSEC. If you have information regarding cultural resources, please feel free to contact me at 503-761-6605. For information about the projects proposed facilities, you may contact me or contact the environmental planner for the project, Irina Makarow of BergerABAM, at 206-431-2373. Feel free to reply by letter, email, or telephone. You may email me at [email protected], or if you prefer, you may email Ms. Makarow at [email protected] Thank you very much for your time and consideration. Sincerely,

    Jo Reese, M.A., R.P.A. VP/Senior Archaeologist Encl.

  • N0 1km

    0 1mi

    Figure 1. The Tesoro Savage Vancouver Energy Distribution Terminal project at the Port of Vancouver, Washington.

    LegendStudy Area

  • NW Lower River Road

    Parcel 1ATerminal 5

    Berth 14

    NW Gate

    way

    Berth 13

    Storage

    Transfer Pipelines

    Marine Terminal

    NW Harborside Drive

    NW Harborside Drive

    Columbia River

    West Boiler

    Transfer Pipelines

    Avenue

    Unloading and Office

    Source: Esri, DigitalGlobe, GeoEye, i-cubed, USDA, USGS, AEX, Getmapping, Aerogrid,IGN, IGP, swisstopo, and the GIS User Community

    N

    0 0.5km

    0 0.5mi

    Figure 2. The Tesoro Savage Vancouver Energy Distribution Terminal study area includes rail unloading, administrative and support buildings at Terminal 5, storage tanks and control room at Parcel 1A, several transfer pipelines, and a marine terminal that includes a control room, dock improvements, and ship loading at Berth 13 and Berth 14.

    LegendStudy Area

  • NW Lower River Road

    NW Gate

    way Ave

    nue

    NW Harborside Drive

    NW Harborside DriveColumbia River

    Terminal 4

    Parcel 1A

    Terminal 5

    Source: Esri, DigitalGlobe, GeoEye, i-cubed, USDA, USGS, AEX, Getmapping, Aerogrid, IGN, IGP, swisstopo,and the GIS User Community

    Figure 3. Previous cultural resource studies within and surrounding the study area.

    0 0.5km

    0 0.5mi

    N

    LegendStudy Area

    Previous Cultural Resource StudiesPort of Vancouver Proposed WRI Coal Terminal - Thomas and Welch 1982

    Port of Vancouver Parcel 1 Project - Forgeng and Reese 1993

    Cogentrix Power's Proposed Gas-Fired Turbine Electric Generation Facility - Thomas 1995

    Clark County Jail Work Center - Moore et al. 1995; Ellis and Mills 1998

    ALCOA Remediation Project - Becker and Roulette 2003

    ALCOA Vancouver Sediment Remediation Project - Zehendner and Fagan 2008

    Port of Vancouver Terminal 4 Improvements Project - Reese 2009a

    Port of Vancouver's Terminal 4 Pond Reconstruction Project - Reese 2009b

    West Vancouver Fright Access Project - Hetzel et al. 2009

    Port of Vancouver' Alcoa/Evergreen Development Project - Fagan and Zehendner 2009

    Port of Vancouver Terminal 5 Bulk Potash Project - Chapman and Blaser 2010

    Port of Vancouver Parcel 2 Project - Davis and Ozbun 2011

    Predetermination: 3103 NW Lower River Road - Jenkins and Davis 2012

    Predetermination: Clark Public Utilities Substation at Jail Work Center - Fuld and Reese 2012

  • Archaeological Investigations Northwest, Inc.

    3510 N.E. 122nd Ave. Portland, Oregon 97230 Vancouver Phone (360) 696-7473 Phone (503) 761-6605 Fax (503) 761-6620 E-mail: [email protected]

    Web: www.ainw.com

    August 20, 2013 Ray Gardner, Chairman Chinook Tribe P.O. Box 368 Bay Center WA 98527 Re: Tesoro Savage Vancouver Energy Distribution Terminal Project Vancouver, Washington Cultural Resource Information Request To The Honorable Ray Gardner: I am writing to provide you with information and a request to initiate coordination regarding the Tesoro Savage Vancouver Energy Distribution Terminal that is proposed to be located at the Port of Vancouver (Port) in Vancouver, Washington (Figures 1 and 2, attached). The proposed facility will receive crude oil by freight rail, temporarily store it on site, and pipe it to marine vessels for shipment via the Columbia River.

    The proposed project is subject to the jurisdiction of the Washington State Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council (EFSEC) since the project is expected to ship over 50,000 barrels of crude oil per day over marine waters. In support of the application to EFSEC, AINW is preparing an analysis of potential impacts to cultural resources in accordance with applicable state statutes and regulations. For purposes of the EFSEC application, the proposed study area will be the area where construction impacts may occur at the Port, as illustrated in the attached figures.

    The project may also require approval from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) for potential in-water work on the existing Port Berths 13 and 14 which will be used to support the marine activities related to the project. For purposes of supporting review by the USACE, a separate cultural resources study meeting the requirements of Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (as amended) and its implementing regulations, 36 CFR 800, will be prepared. The standards of the Washington State Department of Archaeology and Historic Preservation will be followed, and the cultural resource study will be directed by AINW staff who have met the professional qualifications of the Secretary of the Interiors Standards and Guidelines for Archaeology and Historic Preservation. Based on the currently proposed project impacts, my review of previous studies indicate that nearly the entire study area has been previously surveyed for archaeological resources (Figure 3, attached) and none have been identified within the study area; from 1.2 to 6 meters (4 to 20 feet) of dredge fill deposits cover most of the APE and the small portions not previously surveyed are paved and are on the filled area. The applicant is very interested to learn whether you have information regarding properties, features, or materials within the study area that may be of concern to the Chinook Tribe so that these concerns can be addressed in the cultural resources review included in the application to EFSEC. If you have information regarding cultural resources, please feel free to contact me at 503-761-6605. For information about the projects proposed facilities, you may contact me or contact the environmental planner for the project, Irina Makarow of BergerABAM, at 206-431-2373. Feel free to reply by letter, email, or telephone. You may email me at [email protected], or if you prefer, you may email Ms. Makarow at [email protected] Thank you very much for your time and consideration. Sincerely,

    Jo Reese, M.A., R.P.A. VP/Senior Archaeologist Encl.

  • N0 1km

    0 1mi

    Figure 1. The Tesoro Savage Vancouver Energy Distribution Terminal project at the Port of Vancouver, Washington.

    LegendStudy Area

  • NW Lower River Road

    Parcel 1ATerminal 5

    Berth 14

    NW Gate

    way

    Berth 13

    Storage

    Transfer Pipelines

    Marine Terminal

    NW Harborside Drive

    NW Harborside Drive

    Columbia River

    West Boiler

    Transfer Pipelines

    Avenue

    Unloading and Office

    Source: Esri, DigitalGlobe, GeoEye, i-cubed, USDA, USGS, AEX, Getmapping, Aerogrid,IGN, IGP, swisstopo, and the GIS User Community

    N

    0 0.5km

    0 0.5mi

    Figure 2. The Tesoro Savage Vancouver Energy Distribution Terminal study area includes rail unloading, administrative and support buildings at Terminal 5, storage tanks and control room at Parcel 1A, several transfer pipelines, and a marine terminal that includes a control room, dock improvements, and ship loading at Berth 13 and Berth 14.

    LegendStudy Area

  • NW Lower River Road

    NW Gate

    way Ave

    nue

    NW Harborside Drive

    NW Harborside DriveColumbia River

    Terminal 4

    Parcel 1A

    Terminal 5

    Source: Esri, DigitalGlobe, GeoEye, i-cubed, USDA, USGS, AEX, Getmapping, Aerogrid, IGN, IGP, swisstopo,and the GIS User Community

    Figure 3. Previous cultural resource studies within and surrounding the study area.

    0 0.5km

    0 0.5mi

    N

    LegendStudy Area

    Previous Cultural Resource StudiesPort of Vancouver Proposed WRI Coal Terminal - Thomas and Welch 1982

    Port of Vancouver Parcel 1 Project - Forgeng and Reese 1993

    Cogentrix Power's Proposed Gas-Fired Turbine Electric Generation Facility - Thomas 1995

    Clark County Jail Work Center - Moore et al. 1995; Ellis and Mills 1998

    ALCOA Remediation Project - Becker and Roulette 2003

    ALCOA Vancouver Sediment Remediation Project - Zehendner and Fagan 2008

    Port of Vancouver Terminal 4 Improvements Project - Reese 2009a

    Port of Vancouver's Terminal 4 Pond Reconstruction Project - Reese 2009b

    West Vancouver Fright Access Project - Hetzel et al. 2009

    Port of Vancouver' Alcoa/Evergreen Development Project - Fagan and Zehendner 2009

    Port of Vancouver Terminal 5 Bulk Potash Project - Chapman and Blaser 2010

    Port of Vancouver Parcel 2 Project - Davis and Ozbun 2011

    Predetermination: 3103 NW Lower River Road - Jenkins and Davis 2012

    Predetermination: Clark Public Utilities Substation at Jail Work Center - Fuld and Reese 2012

  • Archaeological Investigations Northwest, Inc.

    3510 N.E. 122nd Ave. Portland, Oregon 97230 Vancouver Phone (360) 696-7473 Phone (503) 761-6605 Fax (503) 761-6620 E-mail: [email protected]

    Web: www.ainw.com

    August 20, 2013 Tony Johnson, Cultural Chair Chinook Tribe P.O. Box 368 Bay Center WA 98527 Re: Tesoro Savage Vancouver Energy Distribution Terminal Project Vancouver, Washington Cultural Resource Information Request Dear Mr. Johnson: I am writing to provide you with information and a request to initiate coordination regarding the Tesoro Savage Vancouver Energy Distribution Terminal that is proposed to be located at the Port of Vancouver (Port) in Vancouver, Washington (Figures 1 and 2, attached). The proposed facility will receive crude oil by freight rail, temporarily store it on site, and pipe it to marine vessels for shipment via the Columbia River.

    The proposed project is subject to the jurisdiction of the Washington State Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council (EFSEC) since the project is expected to ship over 50,000 barrels of crude oil per day over marine waters. In support of the application to EFSEC, AINW is preparing an analysis of potential impacts to cultural resources in accordance with applicable state statutes and regulations. For purposes of the EFSEC application, the proposed study area will be the area where construction impacts may occur at the Port, as illustrated in the attached figures.

    The project may also require approval from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) for potential in-water work on the existing Port Berths 13 and 14 which will be used to support the marine activities related to the project. For purposes of supporting review by the USACE, a separate cultural resources study meeting the requirements of Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (as amended) and its implementing regulations, 36 CFR 800, will be prepared. The standards of the Washington State Department of Archaeology and Historic Preservation will be followed, and the cultural resource study will be directed by AINW staff who have met the professional qualifications of the Secretary of the Interiors Standards and Guidelines for Archaeology and Historic Preservation. Based on the currently proposed project impacts, my review of previous studies indicate that nearly the entire study area has been previously surveyed for archaeological resources (Figure 3, attached) and none have been identified within the study area; from 1.2 to 6 meters (4 to 20 feet) of dredge fill deposits cover most of the APE and the small portions not previously surveyed are paved and are on the filled area. The applicant is very interested to learn whether you have information regarding properties, features, or materials within the study area that may be of concern to the Chinook Tribe so that these concerns can be addressed in the cultural resources review included in the application to EFSEC. If you have information regarding cultural resources, please feel free to contact me at 503-761-6605. For information about the projects proposed facilities, you may contact me or contact the environmental planner for the project, Irina Makarow of BergerABAM, at 206-431-2373. Feel free to reply by letter, email, or telephone. You may email me at [email protected], or if you prefer, you may email Ms. Makarow at [email protected] Thank you very much for your time and consideration. Sincerely,

    Jo Reese, M.A., R.P.A. VP/Senior Archaeologist Encl.

  • N0 1km

    0 1mi

    Figure 1. The Tesoro Savage Vancouver Energy Distribution Terminal project at the Port of Vancouver, Washington.

    LegendStudy Area

  • NW Lower River Road

    Parcel 1ATerminal 5

    Berth 14

    NW Gate

    way

    Berth 13

    Storage

    Transfer Pipelines

    Marine Terminal

    NW Harborside Drive

    NW Harborside Drive

    Columbia River

    West Boiler

    Transfer Pipelines

    Avenue

    Unloading and Office

    Source: Esri, DigitalGlobe, GeoEye, i-cubed, USDA, USGS, AEX, Getmapping, Aerogrid,IGN, IGP, swisstopo, and the GIS User Community

    N

    0 0.5km

    0 0.5mi

    Figure 2. The Tesoro Savage Vancouver Energy Distribution Terminal study area includes rail unloading, administrative and support buildings at Terminal 5, storage tanks and control room at Parcel 1A, several transfer pipelines, and a marine terminal that includes a control room, dock improvements, and ship loading at Berth 13 and Berth 14.

    LegendStudy Area

  • NW Lower River Road

    NW Gate

    way Ave

    nue

    NW Harborside Drive

    NW Harborside DriveColumbia River

    Terminal 4

    Parcel 1A

    Terminal 5

    Source: Esri, DigitalGlobe, GeoEye, i-cubed, USDA, USGS, AEX, Getmapping, Aerogrid, IGN, IGP, swisstopo,and the GIS User Community

    Figure 3. Previous cultural resource studies within and surrounding the study area.

    0 0.5km

    0 0.5mi

    N

    LegendStudy Area

    Previous Cultural Resource StudiesPort of Vancouver Proposed WRI Coal Terminal - Thomas and Welch 1982

    Port of Vancouver Parcel 1 Project - Forgeng and Reese 1993

    Cogentrix Power's Proposed Gas-Fired Turbine Electric Generation Facility - Thomas 1995

    Clark County Jail Work Center - Moore et al. 1995; Ellis and Mills 1998

    ALCOA Remediation Project - Becker and Roulette 2003

    ALCOA Vancouver Sediment Remediation Project - Zehendner and Fagan 2008

    Port of Vancouver Terminal 4 Improvements Project - Reese 2009a

    Port of Vancouver's Terminal 4 Pond Reconstruction Project - Reese 2009b

    West Vancouver Fright Access Project - Hetzel et al. 2009

    Port of Vancouver' Alcoa/Evergreen Development Project - Fagan and Zehendner 2009

    Port of Vancouver Terminal 5 Bulk Potash Project - Chapman and Blaser 2010

    Port of Vancouver Parcel 2 Project - Davis and Ozbun 2011

    Predetermination: 3103 NW Lower River Road - Jenkins and Davis 2012

    Predetermination: Clark Public Utilities Substation at Jail Work Center - Fuld and Reese 2012

  • Archaeological Investigations Northwest, Inc.

    3510 N.E. 122nd Ave. Portland, Oregon 97230 Vancouver Phone (360) 696-7473 Phone (503) 761-6605 Fax (503) 761-6620 E-mail: [email protected]

    Web: www.ainw.com

    August 20, 2013 Eirik Thorsgard, MAIS, THPO Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community of Oregon P.O. Box 38 Grand Ronde OR 97347 Re: Tesoro Savage Vancouver Energy Distribution Terminal Project Vancouver, Washington Cultural Resource Information Request Dear Mr. Thorsgard: I am writing to provide you with information and a request to initiate coordination regarding the Tesoro Savage Vancouver Energy Distribution Terminal that is proposed to be located at the Port of Vancouver (Port) in Vancouver, Washington (Figures 1 and 2, attached). The proposed facility will receive crude oil by freight rail, temporarily store it on site, and pipe it to marine vessels for shipment via the Columbia River.

    The proposed project is subject to the jurisdiction of the Washington State Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council (EFSEC) since the project is expected to ship over 50,000 barrels of crude oil per day over marine waters. In support of the application to EFSEC, AINW is preparing an analysis of potential impacts to cultural resources in accordance with applicable state statutes and regulations. For purposes of the EFSEC application, the proposed study area will be the area where construction impacts may occur at the Port, as illustrated in the attached figures.

    The project may also require approval from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) for potential in-water work on the existing Port Berths 13 and 14 which will be used to support the marine activities related to the project. For purposes of supporting review by the USACE, a separate cultural resources study meeting the requirements of Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (as amended) and its implementing regulations, 36 CFR 800, will be prepared. The standards of the Washington State Department of Archaeology and Historic Preservation will be followed, and the cultural resource study will be directed by AINW staff who have met the professional qualifications of the Secretary of the Interiors Standards and Guidelines for Archaeology and Historic Preservation. Based on the currently proposed project impacts, my review of previous studies indicate that nearly the entire study area has been previously surveyed for archaeological resources (Figure 3, attached) and none have been identified within the study area; from 1.2 to 6 meters (4 to 20 feet) of dredge fill deposits cover most of the APE and the small portions not previously surveyed are paved and are on the filled area. The applicant is very interested to learn whether you have information regarding properties, features, or materials within the study area that may be of concern to the Grand Ronde Tribes so that these concerns can be addressed in the cultural resources review included in the application to EFSEC. If you have information regarding cultural resources, please feel free to contact me at 503-761-6605. For information about the projects proposed facilities, you may contact me or contact the environmental planner for the project, Irina Makarow of BergerABAM, at 206-431-2373. Feel free to reply by letter, email, or telephone. You may email me at [email protected], or if you prefer, you may email Ms. Makarow at [email protected] Thank you very much for your time and consideration. Sincerely,

    Jo Reese, M.A., R.P.A. VP/Senior Archaeologist Encl.

  • N0 1km

    0 1mi

    Figure 1. The Tesoro Savage Vancouver Energy Distribution Terminal project at the Port of Vancouver, Washington.

    LegendStudy Area

  • NW Lower River Road

    Parcel 1ATerminal 5

    Berth 14

    NW Gate

    way

    Berth 13

    Storage

    Transfer Pipelines

    Marine Terminal

    NW Harborside Drive

    NW Harborside Drive

    Columbia River

    West Boiler

    Transfer Pipelines

    Avenue

    Unloading and Office

    Source: Esri, DigitalGlobe, GeoEye, i-cubed, USDA, USGS, AEX, Getmapping, Aerogrid,IGN, IGP, swisstopo, and the GIS User Community

    N

    0 0.5km

    0 0.5mi

    Figure 2. The Tesoro Savage Vancouver Energy Distribution Terminal study area includes rail unloading, administrative and support buildings at Terminal 5, storage tanks and control room at Parcel 1A, several transfer pipelines, and a marine terminal that includes a control room, dock improvements, and ship loading at Berth 13 and Berth 14.

    LegendStudy Area

  • NW Lower River Road

    NW Gate

    way Ave

    nue

    NW Harborside Drive

    NW Harborside DriveColumbia River

    Terminal 4

    Parcel 1A

    Terminal 5

    Source: Esri, DigitalGlobe, GeoEye, i-cubed, USDA, USGS, AEX, Getmapping, Aerogrid, IGN, IGP, swisstopo,and the GIS User Community

    Figure 3. Previous cultural resource studies within and surrounding the study area.

    0 0.5km

    0 0.5mi

    N

    LegendStudy Area

    Previous Cultural Resource StudiesPort of Vancouver Proposed WRI Coal Terminal - Thomas and Welch 1982

    Port of Vancouver Parcel 1 Project - Forgeng and Reese 1993

    Cogentrix Power's Proposed Gas-Fired Turbine Electric Generation Facility - Thomas 1995

    Clark County Jail Work Center - Moore et al. 1995; Ellis and Mills 1998

    ALCOA Remediation Project - Becker and Roulette 2003

    ALCOA Vancouver Sediment Remediation Project - Zehendner and Fagan 2008

    Port of Vancouver Terminal 4 Improvements Project - Reese 2009a

    Port of Vancouver's Terminal 4 Pond Reconstruction Project - Reese 2009b

    West Vancouver Fright Access Project - Hetzel et al. 2009

    Port of Vancouver' Alcoa/Evergreen Development Project - Fagan and Zehendner 2009

    Port of Vancouver Terminal 5 Bulk Potash Project - Chapman and Blaser 2010

    Port of Vancouver Parcel 2 Project - Davis and Ozbun 2011

    Predetermination: 3103 NW Lower River Road - Jenkins and Davis 2012

    Predetermination: Clark Public Utilities Substation at Jail Work Center - Fuld and Reese 2012

  • Archaeological Investigations Northwest, Inc.

    3510 N.E. 122nd Ave. Portland, Oregon 97230 Vancouver Phone (360) 696-7473 Phone (503) 761-6605 Fax (503) 761-6620 E-mail: [email protected]

    Web: www.ainw.com

    August 20, 2013 Johnson Meninick, Cultural Resource Program Yakama Indian Nation P.O. Box 151 Toppenish WA 98948 Re: Tesoro Savage Vancouver Energy Distribution Terminal Project Vancouver, Washington Cultural Resource Information Request Dear Mr. Meninick: I am writing to provide you with information and a request to initiate coordination regarding the Tesoro Savage Vancouver Energy Distribution Terminal that is proposed to be located at the Port of Vancouver (Port) in Vancouver, Washington (Figures 1 and 2, attached). The proposed facility will receive crude oil by freight rail, temporarily store it on site, and pipe it to marine vessels for shipment via the Columbia River.

    The proposed project is subject to the jurisdiction of the Washington State Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council (EFSEC) since the project is expected to ship over 50,000 barrels of crude oil per day over marine waters. In support of the application to EFSEC, AINW is preparing an analysis of potential impacts to cultural resources in accordance with applicable state statutes and regulations. For purposes of the EFSEC application, the proposed study area will be the area where construction impacts may occur at the Port, as illustrated in the attached figures.

    The project may also require approval from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) for potential in-water work on the existing Port Berths 13 and 14 which will be used to support the marine activities related to the project. For purposes of supporting review by the USACE, a separate cultural resources study meeting the requirements of Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (as amended) and its implementing regulations, 36 CFR 800, will be prepared. The standards of the Washington State Department of Archaeology and Historic Preservation will be followed, and the cultural resource study will be directed by AINW staff who have met the professional qualifications of the Secretary of the Interiors Standards and Guidelines for Archaeology and Historic Preservation. Based on the currently proposed project impacts, my review of previous studies indicate that nearly the entire study area has been previously surveyed for archaeological resources (Figure 3, attached) and none have been identified within the study area; from 1.2 to 6 meters (4 to 20 feet) of dredge fill deposits cover most of the APE and the small portions not previously surveyed are paved and are on the filled area. The applicant is very interested to learn whether you have information regarding properties, features, or materials within the study area that may be of concern to the Yakama Indian Nation so that these concerns can be addressed in the cultural resources review included in the application to EFSEC. If you have information regarding cultural resources, please feel free to contact me at 503-761-6605. For information about the projects proposed facilities, you may contact me or contact the environmental planner for the project, Irina Makarow of BergerABAM, at 206-431-2373. Feel free to reply by letter, email, or telephone. You may email me at [email protected], or if you prefer, you may email Ms. Makarow at [email protected] Thank you very much for your time and consideration. Sincerely,

    Jo Reese, M.A., R.P.A. VP/Senior Archaeologist Encl.

  • N0 1km

    0 1mi

    Figure 1. The Tesoro Savage Vancouver Energy Distribution Terminal project at the Port of Vancouver, Washington.

    LegendStudy Area

  • NW Lower River Road

    Parcel 1ATerminal 5

    Berth 14

    NW Gate

    way

    Berth 13

    Storage

    Transfer Pipelines

    Marine Terminal

    NW Harborside Drive

    NW Harborside Drive

    Columbia River

    West Boiler

    Transfer Pipelines

    Avenue

    Unloading and Office

    Source: Esri, DigitalGlobe, GeoEye, i-cubed, USDA, USGS, AEX, Getmapping, Aerogrid,IGN, IGP, swisstopo, and the GIS User Community

    N

    0 0.5km

    0 0.5mi

    Figure 2. The Tesoro Savage Vancouver Energy Distribution Terminal study area includes rail unloading, administrative and support buildings at Terminal 5, storage tanks and control room at Parcel 1A, several transfer pipelines, and a marine terminal that includes a control room, dock improvements, and ship loading at Berth 13 and Berth 14.

    LegendStudy Area

  • NW Lower River Road

    NW Gate

    way Ave

    nue

    NW Harborside Drive

    NW Harborside DriveColumbia River

    Terminal 4

    Parcel 1A

    Terminal 5

    Source: Esri, DigitalGlobe, GeoEye, i-cubed, USDA, USGS, AEX, Getmapping, Aerogrid, IGN, IGP, swisstopo,and the GIS User Community

    Figure 3. Previous cultural resource studies within and surrounding the study area.

    0 0.5km

    0 0.5mi

    N

    LegendStudy Area

    Previous Cultural Resource StudiesPort of Vancouver Proposed WRI Coal Terminal - Thomas and Welch 1982

    Port of Vancouver Parcel 1 Project - Forgeng and Reese 1993

    Cogentrix Power's Proposed Gas-Fired Turbine Electric Generation Facility - Thomas 1995

    Clark County Jail Work Center - Moore et al. 1995; Ellis and Mills 1998

    ALCOA Remediation Project - Becker and Roulette 2003

    ALCOA Vancouver Sediment Remediation Project - Zehendner and Fagan 2008

    Port of Vancouver Terminal 4 Improvements Project - Reese 2009a

    Port of Vancouver's Terminal 4 Pond Reconstruction Project - Reese 2009b

    West Vancouver Fright Access Project - Hetzel et al. 2009

    Port of Vancouver' Alcoa/Evergreen Development Project - Fagan and Zehendner 2009

    Port of Vancouver Terminal 5 Bulk Potash Project - Chapman and Blaser 2010

    Port of Vancouver Parcel 2 Project - Davis and Ozbun 2011

    Predetermination: 3103 NW Lower River Road - Jenkins and Davis 2012

    Predetermination: Clark Public Utilities Substation at Jail Work Center - Fuld and Reese 2012

  • Archaeological Investigations Northwest, Inc.

    3510 N.E. 122nd Ave. Portland, Oregon 97230 Vancouver Phone (360) 696-7473 Phone (503) 761-6605 Fax (503) 761-6620 E-mail: [email protected]

    Web: www.ainw.com

    August 20, 2013 Kate Valdez, THPO Yakama Indian Nation P.O. Box 151 Toppenish WA 98948 Re: Tesoro Savage Vancouver Energy Distribution Terminal Project Vancouver, Washington Cultural Resource Information Request Dear Ms. Valdez: I am writing to provide you with information and a request to initiate coordination regarding the Tesoro Savage Vancouver Energy Distribution Terminal that is proposed to be located at the Port of Vancouver (Port) in Vancouver, Washington (Figures 1 and 2, attached). The proposed facility will receive crude oil by freight rail, temporarily store it on site, and pipe it to marine vessels for shipment via the Columbia River.

    The proposed project is subject to the jurisdiction of the Washington State Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council (EFSEC) since the project is expected to ship over 50,000 barrels of crude oil per day over marine waters. In support of the application to EFSEC, AINW is preparing an analysis of potential impacts to cultural resources in accordance with applicable state statutes and regulations. For purposes of the EFSEC application, the proposed study area will be the area where construction impacts may occur at the Port, as illustrated in the attached figures.

    The project may also require approval from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) for potential in-water work on the existing Port Berths 13 and 14 which will be used to support the marine activities related to the project. For purposes of supporting review by the USACE, a separate cultural resources study meeting the requirements of Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (as amended) and its implementing regulations, 36 CFR 800, will be prepared. The standards of the Washington State Department of Archaeology and Historic Preservation will be followed, and the cultural resource study will be directed by AINW staff who have met the professional qualifications of the Secretary of the Interiors Standards and Guidelines for Archaeology and Historic Preservation. Based on the currently proposed project impacts, my review of previous studies indicate that nearly the entire study area has been previously surveyed for archaeological resources (Figure 3, attached) and none have been identified within the study area; from 1.2 to 6 meters (4 to 20 feet) of dredge fill deposits cover most of the APE and the small portions not previously surveyed are paved and are on the filled area. The applicant is very interested to learn whether you have information regarding properties, features, or materials within the study area that may be of concern to the Yakama Indian Nation so that these concerns can be addressed in the cultural resources review included in the application to EFSEC. If you have information regarding cultural resources, please feel free to contact me at 503-761-6605. For information about the projects proposed facilities, you may contact me or contact the environmental planner for the project, Irina Makarow of BergerABAM, at 206-431-2373. Feel free to reply by letter, email, or telephone. You may email me at [email protected], or if you prefer, you may email Ms. Makarow at [email protected] Thank you very much for your time and consideration. Sincerely,

    Jo Reese, M.A., R.P.A. VP/Senior Archaeologist Encl.

  • N0 1km

    0 1mi

    Figure 1. The Tesoro Savage Vancouver Energy Distribution Terminal project at the Port of Vancouver, Washington.

    LegendStudy Area

  • NW Lower River Road

    Parcel 1ATerminal 5

    Berth 14

    NW Gate

    way

    Berth 13

    Storage

    Transfer Pipelines

    Marine Terminal

    NW Harborside Drive

    NW Harborside Drive

    Columbia River

    West Boiler

    Transfer Pipelines

    Avenue

    Unloading and Office

    Source: Esri, DigitalGlobe, GeoEye, i-cubed, USDA, USGS, AEX, Getmapping, Aerogrid,IGN, IGP, swisstopo, and the GIS User Community

    N

    0 0.5km

    0 0.5mi

    Figure 2. The Tesoro Savage Vancouver Energy Distribution Terminal study area includes rail unloading, administrative and support buildings at Terminal 5, storage tanks and control room at Parcel 1A, several transfer pipelines, and a marine terminal that includes a control room, dock improvements, and ship loading at Berth 13 and Berth 14.

    LegendStudy Area

  • NW Lower River Road

    NW Gate

    way Ave

    nue

    NW Harborside Drive

    NW Harborside DriveColumbia River

    Terminal 4

    Parcel 1A

    Terminal 5

    Source: Esri, DigitalGlobe, GeoEye, i-cubed, USDA, USGS, AEX, Getmapping, Aerogrid, IGN, IGP, swisstopo,and the GIS User Community

    Figure 3. Previous cultural resource studies within and surrounding the study area.

    0 0.5km

    0 0.5mi

    N

    LegendStudy Area

    Previous Cultural Resource StudiesPort of Vancouver Proposed WRI Coal Terminal - Thomas and Welch 1982

    Port of Vancouver Parcel 1 Project - Forgeng and Reese 1993

    Cogentrix Power's Proposed Gas-Fired Turbine Electric Generation Facility - Thomas 1995

    Clark County Jail Work Center - Moore et al. 1995; Ellis and Mills 1998

    ALCOA Remediation Project - Becker and Roulette 2003

    ALCOA Vancouver Sediment Remediation Project - Zehendner and Fagan 2008

    Port of Vancouver Terminal 4 Improvements Project - Reese 2009a

    Port of Vancouver's Terminal 4 Pond Reconstruction Project - Reese 2009b

    West Vancouver Fright Access Project - Hetzel et al. 2009

    Port of Vancouver' Alcoa/Evergreen Development Project - Fagan and Zehendner 2009

    Port of Vancouver Terminal 5 Bulk Potash Project - Chapman and Blaser 2010

    Port of Vancouver Parcel 2 Project - Davis and Ozbun 2011

    Predetermination: 3103 NW Lower River Road - Jenkins and Davis 2012

    Predetermination: Clark Public Utilities Substation at Jail Work Center - Fuld and Reese 2012

  • Memorandum Date: August22,2013Subject: NorthwestRegionContingencyPlanningOverviewFrom: IrinaMakarow,BergerABAMTo: DavidCorpron,KellyFlint,SavageRouteto: JobNo.A13.0267.00INTRODUCTION Thepurposeofthefollowingdiscussionistoprovideanoverviewoftheregulatoryframeworkdesignedtoguidetheresponseofthenationandtheregiontoaspill.Thesummarybelowisbasedonpubliclyavailableinformationregardingthefederalregulatorycontextforcontingencyplanning,theNorthwestAreaContingencyPlan(NWACP),1andtheLowerColumbiaRiverGeographicResponsePlan.2ThefirstNationalOilandHazardousSubstancesPollutionContingencyPlan(referredtoastheNationalContingencyPlanorNCP)wasdevelopedandpublishedin1968whenU.S.officialsdevelopedacoordinatedapproachtocopewithpotentialspillsinU.S.waters.The1968planprovidedthefirstcomprehensivesystemofaccidentreporting,spillcontainment,andcleanup,andestablishedaresponseheadquarters,anationalreactionteam,andregionalreactionteams(precursorstothecurrentNationalResponseTeam[NRT]andRegionalResponseTeams[RRT]).CongressbroadenedthescopeoftheNCPovertheyears.AsrequiredbytheCleanWaterActof1972,theNCPwasrevisedthefollowingyeartoincludeaframeworkforrespondingtohazardoussubstancespillsaswellasoildischarges.FollowingthepassageofSuperfundlegislationin1980,theNCPwasbroadenedtocoverreleasesathazardouswastesitesrequiringemergencyremovalactions.ThelatestrevisionstotheNCPwerefinalizedin1994toreflecttheoilspillprovisionsoftheOilPollutionActof1990.Figure1illustrateshowtheseregulatorychangeshavebeenimplementedovertime,andidentifiestheprimaryfederalregulationsnowdirectlyapplicabletothecontingencyplanningeffortstobeimplementedbytheTesoroSavageVancouverEnergyDistributionTerminal(Facility),i.e.,theDischargeofOil

    1NorthwestAreaContingencyPlan20122013,http://www.rrt10nwac.com/Files/NWACP/TOC%202012.pdf,accessed8/11/2013.

    2NorthwestAreaCommittee,LowerColumbiaRiverGeographicResponsePlan,WashingtonStateDepartmentofEcology,Publication95258,RevisedNovember2013.

  • DavidCorpron,KellyFlintAugust12,2013Page2

    Figure 1. Evolution of Spill Prevention, Response and Contingency Planning Requirements since Inception of the National Contingency Plan

  • DavidCorpron,KellyFlintAugust12,2013Page3

    Rule(40CFR110),theOilPollutionPreventionRegulation(40CFR112,33CFR154SubpartsAthroughD),andrequirementsforfacilityresponseplans(40CFR112.20and33CFR154,SubpartF).3ThissummaryisnotacomprehensivereviewofalloftheregulatoryrequirementsthatapplytotheFacility.ItisonlyintendedtoprovideanoverviewofthecomprehensivesystemscurrentlyinplacethattheFacilitywillparticipateinandbesupportedby.NATIONAL OIL AND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES POLLUTION CONTINGENCY PLAN TheFederalWaterPollutionControlAct(33USC1321etseq.)andtheComprehensiveEmergencyResponseCompensationandLiabilityAct(CERCLAorSuperfund)addressthedevelopmentofanationalplanningandresponsesystem.TheNCPisthefederalgovernmentsblueprintforrespondingtooilspillsandhazardoussubstancereleases.Persections311(c)(1)and502(7)oftheCleanWaterAct,theNCPisimplementedthrough40CFR300,andappliesto,andisineffectfor,dischargesofoilintooronthenavigablewatersoftheUnitedStates,ontheadjoiningshorelines,thewatersofthecontiguouszone,intothewatersoftheExclusiveEconomicZone,orthatmayaffectnaturalresourcesbelongingto,appertainingto,orundertheexclusivemanagementauthorityoftheUnitedStates,andreleasesintotheenvironmentofhazardoussubstancesandpollutantsorcontaminants,whichmaypresentanimminentandsubstantialdangertopublichealthorwelfareoftheUnitedStates.TheNCPprovidesthebroad,nationalprioritiesandframeworktoensureefficient,coordinated,andeffectiveactiontominimizetheeffectsofoilandchemicalspills.TheNCPispublishedbytheU.S.EnvironmentalProtectionAgency(EPA)inconsultationwiththeNRT,whichconsistsof16federalagencieswithresponsibilities,interests,andexpertiseinvariousaspectsofemergencyresponsetopollutionincidents.TheNCPestablishesandimplementsaunifiedcommandstructureformanagingresponsestodischargesthroughcoordinatedpersonnelandresourcesofthefederalgovernment,thestategovernment,andtheresponsibleparty.TheNationalResponseSystemcoordinatesallgovernmentagencieswithresponsibilityforhumanhealthandenvironmentalprotectioninafocusedresponsestrategyfortheimmediateandeffectivecleanupofanoilorhazardoussubstancespill.ItisathreetieredfederalresponseandpreparednesssystemthatsupportsthepredesignatedFederalOnSceneCoordinator(FOSC)andStateOnSceneCoordinator(SOSC)incoordinatingnational,regional,state,tribal,andlocalgovernmentagencies,industry,andtheresponsiblepartyduringaresponse.TheEPAservesaschairoftheNRTandtheU.S.CoastGuardasvicechair,exceptwhenactivatedforaspecificincident,whentheleadresponseagencyrepresentativeservesaschair.TheNRTisprimarilyanationalplanning,policy,andcoordinationbodyanddoesnotrespond3Regulationswerealsoimplementedforrollingstock(i.e.,truckandrail);however,thesedonotapplytotheFacilityandarenotfurtherdiscussedinthismemorandum.

  • DavidCorpron,KellyFlintAugust12,2013Page4

    directlytoincidents.TheNRTprovidespolicyguidancepriortoanincidentandassistanceasrequestedbyaFOSCviaanRRTduringanincident.NRTassistanceusuallytakestheformoftechnicaladvice,accesstoadditionalresources/equipment,and/orcoordinationwithRRTs.REGIONAL AND AREA CONTINGENCY PLANS Thirteenregionalcontingencyplans(RCPs)aremodeledaftertheNCPandaddinformationspecifictoeachregion.TheNCPalsoestablishesRRTsanddefinestheirrolesandresponsibilitiesintheNationalResponseSystem,includingcoordinatingpreparedness,planning,andresponseattheregionallevel.Thereare13RRTs,oneforeachofthe10federalregionsandAlaska,theCaribbean,andthePacificBasin.EachRRTconsistsofastandingteammadeupofrepresentativesofeachfederalagencythatisamemberoftheNRT,aswellasstateandlocalgovernmentrepresentatives,andalsoanincidentspecificteammadeupofmembersofthestandingteamthatisactivatedforaresponse.TheRRTalsoprovidesoversightandconsistencyreviewforareaplanswithinagivenregion.TheRRToperatingintheNorthwestAreahasagreedtousetheNWACPastheRCP.PursuanttotheNCP(40CFR300),areacommitteeshavealsobeenestablishedforeachareaoftheUnitedStatesthathasbeendesignatedbythePresident.Theareacommitteesarecomposedofpersonnelfromfederalandstateagencieswhocoordinateresponseactionswithtribalandlocalgovernmentsandwiththeprivatesector.Areacommittees,underthecoordinateddirectionoftheFOSC,areresponsiblefordevelopingareacontingencyplans(ACPs).Areacommitteesarealsorequiredtoworkwiththeresponsecommunitytodevelopprocedurestoexpeditedecisionsfortheuseofalternativeresponsemeasures.Designatingareas,appointingareacommitteemembers,determininginformationtobeincludedin,andreviewingareacontingencyplans,havebeendelegatedbyExecutiveOrder12777of22October1991,totheCommandantoftheCoastGuard(throughtheDepartmentofHomelandSecurity)forthecoastalzone,andtotheAdministratoroftheEPAfortheinlandzone.AsoutlinedintheNCP40CFR300.5,thecoastalzoneisdefinedasallUnitedStateswaterssubjecttothetide,specifiedportsandharborsoninlandrivers,watersofthecontiguouszone,otherwatersofthehighseassubjecttotheNCP,andthelandsurfacesorlandsubstrate,andgroundwaters,andambientairproximaltothosewaters.Theinlandzoneisdefinedastheenvironmentinlandofthecoastalzoneexcludingspecifiedportsandharborsoninlandrivers.TheEPAandtheCoastGuardhavedefinedthejurisdictionalboundaryseparatingthecoastalandinlandzones.Allwaterwaysthatmarktheboundarybetweentwostates(e.g.,theColumbiaandSnakeriversseparatingportionsofWashingtonandOregon)arealsothejoint,sharedresponsibilityofbothborderingstates.Spillsaffecting,orwiththepotentialtoaffect,sharedwatermustbereportedtobothstatesandbothstateswillnormallyparticipateintheunifiedresponse.Figure2illustratestheinterrelationshipofnational,regional,andareacontingencyplans,andhowfacilityresponseplans(FRPs)(i.e.,facilitycontingencyplans)areconnectedtothisoverall

  • DavidCorpron,KellyFlintAugust12,2013Page5

    structure.AsnotedinFigure2,vesselscarryingoilandhazardousmaterialsarealsorequiredtoprepareandimplementresponseplansincoordinationwiththeapplicableACPsoftheareatheyfrequentandtheFRPsofthefacilitieswheretheyloadorunloadproduct.

    Figure 2. Interrelationship of national, regional, and area contingency plans IntheNorthwestArea(definedasthecoastalandinlandzonesofIdaho,Oregon,andWashington),theregionalandareagroupshavejoinedtogethertoaccomplishallplanningandpreparednessactivitiesandjointlypublishtheNWACP.Toensureallimpactsofapotentialreleaseareunderstoodandrespondedto,awidevarietyoforganizationsparticipateinthepreparationoftheNWACP,includingregulatoryagencies,Tribes,nongovernmentalorganizations,industryandresponsecontractors.Figure3isanexcerptfromtheRegion10RRT/NorthwestAreaCommittee2005StrategicPlan,illustratingthemultipleagenciesandcommitteemembersthatparticipateintheareaplanningeffort.4

    4RegionalResponseTeam/NorthwestAreaCommittee2005StrategicPlan(revisedFebruary28,2008),http://www.rrt10nwac.com/Files/StrategicPlan/090306015646.pdf,accessedAugust22,2013.

  • DavidCorpron,KellyFlintAugust22,2013Page6

    Figure 3. Organization of groups responding to Region 10 incidents

  • DavidCorpron,KellyFlintAugust22,2013Page7

    WASHINGTON CONTINGENCY PLANNING Multiplestateagenciesalsoparticipateinvariousaspectsofspillcontingencyplanningandresponse.Thecomplexityandjurisdictionalcharacteristicsofanincidentwilldeterminethelevelofinvolvementoffederal,state,local,tribal,responsibleparty,andotherresponders.Theauthorityforprimaryresponsetospillsisattributedtotheprimarystateagenciesasfollows: WashingtonStateDepartmentofEcology(Ecology):Oilspills WashingtonStatePatrol(WSP)orotherdesignatedlocalagencyperRCW70.136:HazMat

    Spills DepartmentofHealth:Biologicalandradiologicalspills EmergencyManagementDivision:DisastersTheremainderofthisdiscussionfocusesonresponsetooilspills.TheNWACPhasalsobeenadoptedasthestatesoilandhazardoussubstancespillpreventionandresponseplan,asrequiredbystatute(seeChapter90.56.060RCW).Thisplanappliestotheactivitiesofallstateandlocalagenciesinvolvedinmanagingoilandhazardoussubstancespillswherefederal,state,andlocalagenciesrespondtoaspillorpotentialspillofoilorhazardoussubstances.Ecologyisdesignatedasthestatesleadagencytooverseeprevention,abatement,response,containment,andcleanupeffortswithregardtoanoilorhazardoussubstancespilltowatersofthestate.WashingtonstatelawhasestablishedEcologyasthepredesignatedSOSCforalloilandhazardoussubstancespillsinstatewaters.Assuch,Ecologyisalsoresponsibleforsupportingfederalresponseactions.Inthisrole,Ecologyeffectivelyrepresentsallstateagenciesandtheinterestsofthestateanditscitizens.Ecologywillrespondtoanysignificantdischargeorthreateneddischarge.Ecologywillprovidelocalgeographicandenvironmentalinformation;identifyandprioritizevulnerableresourcesinconsultationwithotherresourceagenciesthroughtheEnvironmentalUnit;fundorphanoilspillsthroughtheOilSpillRecoveryAct;andcoordinatewithotherstateagencies.Thestatehasdevisedparallelstatutesonwaterpollutionandmarinetransportationsafetythatmeet,orinsomecasesexceed,thestandardssetforthinfederallegislation.TheWashingtonStateEmergencyResponsesystemisdesignedtoprovidecoordinatedstateagencyresponse,incooperationwithfederalagenciesforeffectivecleanupofoilorhazardoussubstancespills.Ecologyactsasstateincidentcommanderforoilorhazardoussubstancespillsorthreatenedspillstowatersofthestate.Ecologyprovides24hourresponsetooilandhazardoussubstancespillswhenanyamountofregulatedwasteorhazardoussubstanceisreleasedtotheair,land,orwater,orwheneveroilisspilledonlandortostatewaters.Asneeded,EcologydeploysSOSCstoanincident.TheagencymaintainsspillresponseteamsinOlympia,Seattle,Bellingham,Vancouver,Spokane,andYakimathatprovideroundtheclockresponseservicetoemergenciesthatposeanimmediatethreattohumanhealthandtheenvironment.

  • DavidCorpron,KellyFlintAugust22,2013Page8

    Ecologyconfirmsemergencynotifications;determinesthesourceandcauseofanincident;identifiestheresponsiblepartyforanoilspillorhazardoussubstancerelease;assumesresponsibilityforincidentmanagementandcleanupiftheresponsiblepartyisunavailable,unresponsive,orunidentified;setsstatecleanupstandardsandensuresthatsourcecontrol,containment,cleanupanddisposalareaccomplished;assistsinmonitoringandensuringthesafetyoffirstrespondersandotherpersonnel;determinestheneedforandinitiatesappropriateenforcementactions;coordinatesspillresponsewithotherstateandfederalagenciesandtribalandlocaljurisdictionsusingtheNationalIncidentManagementSystemmodeloftheIncidentCommandSystem(ICS);establishesaJointInformationCenter(JIC)withinvolvedagenciesandtheresponsiblepartytoprovidecurrentandaccurateinformationtothecommunity;conductsonsiteinspectionsofcommercialvesselsandoilhandlingfacilities;investigatesthecauseofcommercialvesselandoilhandlingfacilityspills;providesmaritimeexpertise,suchasadviceonsalvageoperations;leads,activates,andcoordinatestheNaturalResourceDamageAssessment(NRDA)team;participatesintheactivitiesoftheWildlifeBranchoftheOperationsSectionoftheICS;andnotifiestheappropriateresourcetrusteeagencyofinjurytofish,shellfish,habitat,andotherwildlife.UndertheWashingtonStateEmergencyResponsesystem,theWSPassumesresponsibilityasIncidentCommanderandactsastheleadstateagencyresponsibleforcleanupactivitieswhenoilandhazardoussubstancespillsoccuronstatehighways.TheWSPalsoassistslocaljurisdictionswithlawenforcementandevacuations;representslocaljurisdictionsasdesignatedIncidentCommander;coordinatesandmaintainsliaisonwithotherstateagenciesinvolvedwithanincident;assistsinreceivinganddisseminatingwarninginformation;providescommunicationsandtechnicalsupporttotheincident;providesradiologicalmonitoring;providesaerialreconnaissanceoftheimpactedarea;coordinatesfireresourceswhenanemergencymobilizationisauthorizedforahazardoussubstanceincident;andprovides24hour,statewidecommunicationssupport.TheWashingtonMilitaryDepartmentsEmergencyManagementDivision(EMD)maintainscapabilitiestomake24hournotificationstoEcology,WSP,andotherappropriatelocal,tribal,state,andfederalagencies.TheEMDalsoactivatesthestateEmergencyOperationsCenterwhenrequired;coordinatesstateagencyresponseactivitieswithinthestateEmergencyOperationsCenter,includingprocurementofstateresources,asrequested;providespublicinformationofficersupporttoJICsorIncidentCommandPosts;andprovidescommunicationlinksonanongoingbasis.Duringoilspills,theWashingtonDepartmentofFishandWildlifecoordinatesactivitiesfortherescueandrehabilitationofwildlifeinjuredduringoilandhazardoussubstancespillsandreleases;assistsinidentificationoffishandwildlifeprotectionneeds;andassistsinreconnaissanceandNRDAefforts.

  • DavidCorpron,KellyFlintAugust22,2013Page9

    ThestateDepartmentofHealthisresponsibleforhandlingenvironmentalspillsandreleasesinvolvingradioactivesubstancesandbiologicalagents.Thedepartmentassistsindeterminationofpublichealthimpactstofishandshellfishharvestingandconsumption.ThestateDepartmentofNaturalResourcesassistsintheidentificationofaquatichabitat/statelandsprotectionneeds.ThestateOfficeofArchaeologyandHistoricPreservationassistsintheidentificationofhistoric/archaeologicalresourceprotectionneeds.ThestateParksandRecreationCommissionassistsinresponseactivitiesinvolvingstateparklandsandproperty.Localjurisdictionsareusuallythefirstresponderstooilandhazardoussubstancespillsandreleases.UndertheWashingtonStateEmergencyResponseSystem,localjurisdictionsmustdesignatealocalIncidentCommandagency,usuallyafiredepartment,ortheymaydelegatethatresponsibilitytotheWSP.UndertheSuperfundAmendmentsandReauthorizationAct(SARA),TitleIII,LocalEmergencyPlanningCommitteesmaybeinvolvedwithplanning,training,andassistingwithinteragencycoordination.TheymayalsoactivatetheirlocalEmergencyOperationsCentertosupportonsceneoperations,makenotifications,andrespondtorequestsforresourcesandotherassistance.GEOGRAPHIC RESPONSE PLANS Geographicresponseplans(GRPs)areanannextotheNWACPandakeyelementofbothfacilityandvesselcontingencyplans.GRPsarethefinaltierintheregionalplanningeffort.GRPsprovideadescriptionofsensitivebiological,cultural,andeconomicresources.Fromanoperationalperspective,GRPsguiderespondersinthefirst12to24hoursofanoilspillbyprovidingprioritizedlistsoftacticalresponsestrategiestobeimplementedduringtheearlyhoursofanoilspill(usuallybeforetheformationofunifiedcommand),andbyprovidingdetailedinformationforboomingstrategiesthatcouldbeusedtominimizeimpactstopredeterminedsensitiveresources.BecausetheGRPsaretheprimarytoolusedduringaninitialphaseoftheresponseandfairlybroadintheirscope,theyarenotintendedtominimizeimpactstoallpossiblesensitiveareasthatcouldbeaffectedbyanoilspill.Likewise,theGRPsarenotintendedtobeanexhaustivelistofallofthetacticalstrategiesthatcould,orshould,beimplementedduringaspill.DevelopmentofGRPsintheNorthwestisacollaborativeprocess.GRPsaredevelopedthroughworkshopsandfieldworkinvolvingfederal,state,andlocaloilspillemergencyresponseexperts,representativesfromtribes,localgovernments,industry,ports,environmentalorganizations,pilots,andresponsecontractors.Workshopparticipantsidentifyresources,developoperationalstrategies,helpprioritizethestrategies,andpinpointlogisticalsupport.ItisimportanttoinvolvelocalgovernmentsandlocalcommunitiesintheprocessofdevelopingaGRP.Fieldworkisconductedtovisittheselectedsites,confirmtheexistenceoftheresourceatrisk,andfurtherrefinetheoperationalstrategies.GRPstrategiesaretestedduringdrillsandspillsorduringtheplandevelopmentprocess.

  • DavidCorpron,KellyFlintAugust22,2013Page10

    TheWashingtonGRPspecificallyaddressesresponseactivitiesintheLowerColumbiaRiver.5AsaddressedintheGRP,theLowerColumbiaRiverincludestheportionoftheriverfromBonnevilleDamtotheestuaryatitsmouth,adistanceofapproximately145miles,andthelowerWillametteRiverfromWillametteFallstoitsconfluencewiththeColumbia,adistanceofapproximately26miles.TheLowerColumbiaportionoftheGRPspecificallyaddressesthevicinityofthePortofVancouver(Port)wheretheFacilitywillbelocated.TheLowerColumbiaGRPaddressesthespecificcharacteristicsoftheareatobeconsideredinresponseactivities(includingphysicalfeatures,hydrology,currentandtides,winds,climateandriskassessment),providesriverboomingstrategymaps,protectionandcollectionstrategies,identifiesshorelinecharacteristicsandsensitiveresources,anddescribesthelogisticalsupportavailableintheeventofarelease.Figures4and5aand5bareexcerptsfromtheGRP,andillustratethegeographicalareaspecificplanningapplicabletothevicinityofthePort.Figure4illustratesthecurrentproposedboomingstrategiesalongtheWillametteandColumbiarivers.Figure5aidentifiesthesensitivewildliferesourcesandtheirseasonalpresenceinthevicinityofthePort.Figure5bidentifiesthelocationofsensitivespeciesuseareasinthevicinityofthePort.TheGRPwouldbereviewedtotakeintoaccountthepresenceofthenewFacility,andadditionalresourcesforspillcontrolestablishedastheyweredeterminednecessarybylocal,state,andfederalresponders,astheyhavebeenwhenothernewfacilitieshavebeenestablishedintheLowerColumbia.

    5NorthwestAreaCommittee,LowerColumbiaRiverGeographicResponsePlan(GRP),November2003,WashingtonStateDepartmentofEcologyPublicationNo.95258(Revised1103),http://www.ecy.wa.gov/programs/spills/preparedness/GRP/ColumbiaRiver/LowerColumbiaRiver.htm,accessedAugust22,2013.

  • DavidCorpron,KellyFlintAugust22,2013Page11

    Figure 4. Booming strategies in the vicinity of the Port of Vancouver

  • DavidCorpron,KellyFlintAugust18,2013Page12

    LOWER COLUMBIA RIVER WILDLIFE RESOURCES

    River Mile 104-110

    Code Location Seabird Colony

    Seabird Conc

    WaterfowlConc

    Marine MammalHaulout

    SensitiveNesting Species

    Shorebirdconc

    Flight Exclusion Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec

    WLC-12 West of Lieser Point Yes Yes

    WLC-13 Tomahawk Island Yes Yes

    * FLIGHT AND GROUND ENTRY RESTRICTIONS

    Flights below 1000 feet require clearance

    Sensitive season Minimize overflight disturbance

    Figure 5a. Sensitive wildlife resources and their seasonal presence in the vicinity of the Port of Vancouver

  • DavidCorpron,KellyFlintAugust18,2013Page13

    Figure 5b. Location of sensitive species use areas in the vicinity of the Port of Vancouver

  • DavidCorpron,KellyFlintAugust18,2013Page14

    LOCAL PLANS LocalemergencyresponseplansareproducedbytheLocalEmergencyPlanningCommittees;themembersofthesecommitteesaredrawnfromgovernmentagencies,includinglocalfire,police,emergencymanagers,industry,citizens,andotherinterestedparties.Theseplansguidelocaleffortsinrespondingtoanoilorhazardousmaterialsspill.FACILITY RESPONSE PLANS Facilityresponseplansandvesselresponseplanscomprisethefinaltierofplans.Thesearerequiredforoilcargohandlingfacilitiesorvessels.Theseplansdetailpollutionresponseactionplansforthespecificvesselorfacility,andmustbesubmittedtoEcologyandtheCoastGuard/EPAforrevieworapproval,dependingonthethreattotheenvironment.EachowneroroperatorofatankvesselorfacilityrequiredbyOPAtosubmitaresponseplandoessoinaccordancewithapplicableregulations.Facilityandtankvesselresponseplanregulations,includingplanrequirementsforthecoastalzone,arelocatedin33CFRParts154and155,respectively.Facilityresponseplanregulationsfortheinlandzonearelocatedin40CFRPart112.Eachpartyresponsibleforavesselorafacilityfromwhichoilisdischarged,orwhichposesasubstantialthreatofadischarge,intooruponthenavigablewaters,adjoiningshorelines,ortheExclusiveEconomicZoneoftheUnitedStates,isliablefortheremovalcostsanddamagesspecifiedinSubsection(b)ofSection1002ofOPA.AnyremovalactivityundertakenbyaresponsiblepartymustbeconsistentwiththeprovisionsoftheNCPandtheRCP.TheFacilitywilldevelopanFRPinconsultationwithallpotentialspillresponders,andinconsiderationoftheexistingresponseinfrastructurethatcouldbecalledintoactionintheeventofaspill.Throughthisprocess,agencieswouldmakeadeterminationastowhetheradditionalregionalspillresponsecapabilityisneeded,andwhereitshouldbestationed.INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS AND PRIVATE RSPSONSE CONTRACTORS Inadditiontotheresourcesmadeavailablebylocal,state,andfederalagencies,twoprivateorganizationsprovideemergencyandspillresponseservicestotheLowerColumbiaRiverarea:theMarineFireandSafetyAssociation(MFSA)6andtheCleanRiversCooperative(CRC).7Bothoftheseorganizationsarefinanciallysupportedbytheindustriestheyserve.MarinevesselsberthingattheFacilitytoloadcrudeoilwouldtakepartintheMFSA,whereastheFacilitywouldbecomeamemberoftheCRC.Together,thesetwoorganizationsprovidealltheequipmentneededtorespondtoGroup2,3,4crudeoilspills(asdefinedinWAC173182030),suchasproductthatwouldbehandledbytheFacility.

    6http://www.mfsa.com,accessedAugust22,2013.7http://www.cleanriverscooperative.com,accessedAugust22,2013.

  • DavidCorpron,KellyFlintAugust18,2013Page15

    MFSA TheMFSAwasestablishedinNovember1983.Membershipiscurrentlymadeupof25portsandprivatefacilitiesalongtheLowerColumbiaandWillametterivers.Themembershavetaskedthemselveswithdevelopingasystemtoensureanadequate,timely,andwellcoordinatedresponsetoshipboardfiresalongthe110mileshippingchannel,whichincludestwostates,sevencounties,14cities,sevenportdistricts,andover20fireagencies.MFSAsshipboardfireprogramisdirectedbytheFireProtectionAgenciesAdvisoryCouncil(FPAAC),madeupof12participatingpublicfireagencies,includingtheVancouverFireDepartment,ClarkCountyFireDistrictNo.6,andClarkCountyFire&Rescue;ClatskanieRuralProtectionFireDistrict;ColumbiaRiverFire&Rescue;CowlitzCountyFireDistrictNo.1;CowlitzCountyFireDistrictNo.5;Cowlitz2Fire&Rescue;LongviewFireDepartment;PortlandFire&Rescue;ScappooseRuralFireDistrict;PortlandFire&RescueandtheU.S.CoastGuardSectorPortland.TheMFSAcurrentlyprovidesservicesto97barges,51tankers,and1351cargovessels.In1991,inresponsetotheOilPollutionActof1990,OregonandWashingtonenactedrequirementsthatallcommercialvesselsover300grosstonshaveanoilspillcontingencyplan.Inordertocomply,vesselsmusteitherenrollinanumbrellaplancoveringtheLowerColumbiaandWillametterivers,orhavetheirownapprovedoilspillcontingencyplanonfilewiththestates.Plansmustspecifyaresponsecontractorandadequateequipmenttoeffectivelyrespondtotheworstcasedischargeidentifiedintheplan.MFSAdevelopedandmaintainsastateapprovedvesselresponseplan(knownastheMFSAplan).MembersrepresentingallphasesofthemaritimeindustryfrombothOregonandWashingtonparticipatedinthepreparationofthisplan.Tomeetthestaterequirements,MFSAandCRCjoinedforcesthroughamemorandumofunderstandingexecutedin1992.TheMFSA/CRCpartnershipmakesavailablethelargestinventoryofdedicatedspillresponseresourcesandallowsplancoverageforvesselstransitingtheLowerColumbiaandWillametterivers.Aspartofthisagreement,MFSAcontributesfinanciallytocoownresponseequipmentprovidedbyprivatecontractors.MFSAhasestablishedacomprehensivenetworkoffirefightingandcommunicationsequipmentlocatedforresponseactivitiesthroughouttheLowerColumbia.Table1summarizestheMFSAfirefightingandcommunicationsequipmentthatisavailableandspillresponseequipmentcoownedwithCRC.

  • DavidCorpron,KellyFlintAugust18,2013Page16

    Table 1 - MSFA Emergency Response Equipment

    Shipboard Firefighting Microwave Communications System Spill Response

    Handheld radios Generators Breathing air compressor

    systems Gas monitors Hose Smoke generators Ics kits Booster pumps for cascade

    systems Petrogen torch Smoke ejectors Life line Breathing apparatus Foam (afff-atc) Slice packs Co2 equipment Technical response

    equipment Incident commanders radio

    interface

    Command and control microwave

    Repeater system using simulcast

    Technology with continuous VHF FM

    Radio coverage between Astoria and Portland/Vancouver

    Regional foam supply & equipment (2 trailers)

    Oil containment boom Wildlife response &

    rehabilitation unit and equipment

    Oil recovery skimmers Portable radios & repeater

    systems Mobile command unit DP 160 & 250 offloading

    pumps Fleet of over 30 vessels

    CRC Foundedin1971asanonprofitoilspillresponseorganization,CRCwascreatedtoprovidemutualaidtocompanieswithavestedinterestinmaintaininganefficientandrapidresponsetomarinespills.CRChasbecometheregionsforemostmarinespillsolution,withover$3millionofequipmentdedicatedtomembersandtheiroperationsinOregonandWashington.CRCisamemberbased,notforprofitdedicatedtoprofessionalspillresponseandthepreventionofmaritimepetroleumspills.CRCstagesequipmentat14locationsalongtheColumbiaandWillametterivers,focusedespeciallyonenvironmentallysensitiveareas.Table2summarizesthisequipment.

    Table 2 - CRC, Inc. Spill Response Equipment Staged along Columbia and Willamette Rivers Equipment Description Containment Boom

    Oil spill containment boom is a floating barrier used to contain oil spilled into water. CRC has 11,400 feet of 12-inch boom, 1,000 feet of 40-inch boom, 45,400 feet of 20-inch boom, and 700 feet of 30-inch boom, totaling 62,600 feet of oil spill containment boom on the Columbia and Willamette rivers.

    Workboats

    Workboats are functional vessels used to support oil spill response operations. CRC maintains three fast response vessels (FRVs) for rapid response to spills. The vessels are often used in deploying containment boom and assist water recovery operations. CRC also maintains four additional workboats, two large skiffs and three small support skiffs

    Oil Spill Response Vessels (OSRVs)

    CRC maintains four 34-foot OSRVs outfitted with skimming systems and storage capability for oil spill recovery operations. Each OSRV provides an estimated daily recovery capacity (EDRC) of 3,270 barrels per day.

  • DavidCorpron,KellyFlintAugust18,2013Page17

    Equipment Description Portable Skimmers

    Portable skimmers are mechanical skimming systems used to remove oil from water, maximizing the amount of oil to water recovered. Oil skimmers come in three common types: weir, oleophilic, and drum. CRC maintains 39 portable skimming systems with a total EDRC of 75,545 barrels per day.

    Storage Capacity

    CRC has six shallow water recovery barges equipped with Lori skimmers having an EDRC of 2,473 barrels per day per barge. In addition, CRC has five shallow water barges, seven 2,500-gallon towable bladders, and 10 1,000-gallon portable fast tanks to store spilled product. In addition, CRC has by agreement two large, 12,000-barrel storage barges and fixed facility storage tanks along the Columbia and Willamette rivers.

    Wildlife Response and Rehabilitation System

    CRCs state-of-the-art wildlife care equipment is made up of a response & rehabilitation unit, transport unit and rehabilitation shelter. IBR serves as CRCs wildlife response contractor, with experts in wildlife rescue and rehabilitation.

    Command and Communications Unit

    CRC also maintains a 53-foot trailer outfitted with todays newest technologies, for use as a mobile command post and communications center anywhere on the Columbia and Willamette rivers. The unit is equipped with a conference room that includes whiteboards, teleconference and projection capability, a workspace with computers, satellite phone and internet connections, and a radio communications room equipped with UHF, VHF, and air/ground frequencies among others.

    WEST COAST MUTUAL AID DuringmajorandcatastrophicspillsontheWestCoast,itmaybenecessarytoexpeditethecrossboundarytransferofadditionalresponsecapabilitiesthatcanbeprovidedonlybyprivatecontractors.Manyofthesecontractorshavesignedcommitmentswithfacilityand/orvesseloperatorsthat,ifreleasedtoanotherspill,wouldplacethemoutofcompliancewiththeirfederalorstate/provincialapprovedspillcontingencyplan.ThemembersofthePacificStates/BritishColumbiaOilSpillTaskForcearetheprimarystateandprovincialspillpreventionandresponseagenciesforAlaska,BritishColumbia,Washington,Oregon,California,andHawaii.InanefforttoexpediteandenhancetheresponsetomajorWestCoastspills,themembersofthetaskforceapprovedandsignedthe1993mutualaidagreementwhichwillbeactivatedbytheunifiedcommandifadditionalresourcesareneeded.Thepurposeofthispreapprovedagreementistospecifyconditionswherebycontingencyplanholdersmaybeallowedtomeettemporarilyreducedresponsestandardsinorderthattheirresponseequipmentmaybeavailableformutualaid.ThisagreementtherebyassuresthatmostofthespillresponseequipmentontheWestCoastwillbeavailabletorespondrapidlyintheeventofamajorspill.:im

  • Appendix B.2 Tesoro Savage Vancouver Energy Distribution Terminal Vancouver, Washington Spill Prevention Control and Countermeasure Plan (SPCCP) Preliminary Outline 29 August 2013 Prepared by: BergerABAM 1111 Main Street, Suite 300 Vancouver, Washington 98660 Job No. A13.0267.00

  • AppendixB.2SPCCPPreliminaryOutline BergerABAMTesoroSavageVancouverEnergyDistributionTerminal 29August2013Vancouver,Washington Pageiofiii

    TESORO SAVAGE VANCOUVER ENERGY DISTRIBUTION TERMINAL SPILL PREVENTION CONTROL AND COUNTERMEASURE PLAN (SPCCP)

    TABLE OF CONTENTS

    SECTION PAGE 1.0 INTRODUCTION AND FACILITY INFORMATION .......................................................................... 1

    1.1 Introduction..................................................................................................................... 11.2 Name and Address of Facility ........................................................................................ 11.3 Type of Facility ................................................................................................................ 11.4 Location and Background .............................................................................................. 1

    2.0 PURPOSE AND SCOPE ................................................................................................................ 12.1 Purpose............................................................................................................................ 12.2 Scope ............................................................................................................................... 12.3 Location of SPCCP ......................................................................................................... 12.4 Spill Events Requiring Written Reports ........................................................................ 12.5 SPCCP Review and Amendment Requirements .......................................................... 12.6 Plan Conformance .......................................................................................................... 2

    2.6.1 Conformance with Other Regulations .............................................................. 23.0 FACILITY LAYOUT AND DESCRIPTION ........................................................................................ 2

    3.1 Area 200 Unloading .................................................................................................... 23.2 Area 300 Storage ........................................................................................................ 23.3 Area 400 Marine Terminal.......................................................................................... 23.4 Area 500 Transfer Pipelines ....................................................................................... 23.5 Area 600 West Boiler Building................................................................................... 2

    4.0 EQUIPMENT FAILURE .................................................................................................................. 24.1 Area 200 Unloading .................................................................................................... 24.2 Area 300 Storage ........................................................................................................ 24.3 Area 400 Marine Terminal.......................................................................................... 34.4 Area 500 Transfer Pipelines ....................................................................................... 34.5 Area 600 West Boiler Building................................................................................... 3

    5.0 STRUCTURAL CONTAINMENT SYSTEMS.................................................................................... 35.1 Dikes, Berms, and Walls ................................................................................................ 35.2 Curbing ............................................................................................................................ 35.3 Drainage Systems ........................................................................................................... 35.4 Weirs, Booms, or Other Barriers ................................................................................... 35.5 Spill Diversion Ponds ...................................................................................................... 35.6 Spill Retention Ponds ..................................................................................................... 3

  • AppendixB.2SPCCPPreliminaryOutline BergerABAMTesoroSavageVancouverEnergyDistributionTerminal 29August2013Vancouver,Washington Pageiiofiii

    5.7 Sorbent Materials and Additional Mobile Containment Systems .............................. 36.0 INSPECTION RECORDS ............................................................................................................... 3

    6.1 Aboveground Tank and Piping Inspection .................................................................... 36.2 Secondary Containment Inspection and Monitoring .................................................. 36.3 Marine Terminal Loading Inspection ............................................................................ 3

    7.0 PERSONNEL TRAINING AND SPILL PREVENTION PROCEDURES ............................................ 47.1 Personnel Training ......................................................................................................... 47.2 Supervision ...................................................................................................................... 47.3 Spill Prevention Briefings .............................................................................................. 4

    8.0 SECURITY ..................................................................................................................................... 49.0 FACILITY UNLOADING RACKS .................................................................................................... 4

    9.1 Unloading Procedures .................................................................................................... 49.2 Spill Containment Systems............................................................................................ 49.3 Warning Devices ............................................................................................................. 49.4 Brittle Fracture ............................................................................................................... 4

    10.0 SUPPLEMENTAL REQUIREMENTS FOR ONSHORE FACILITIES ............................................... 410.1 Drainage from Diked Storage Areas ............................................................................. 410.2 Flapper-Type Drain Valves .............................................................................................. 510.3 Drainage from Undiked Areas ....................................................................................... 510.4 Diversion System ............................................................................................................ 510.5 Natural Hydraulic Flow ................................................................................................... 5

    11.0 BULK STORAGE TANK AND CONTAINERS ................................................................................. 511.1 Tank Construction .......................................................................................................... 511.2 Secondary Containment ................................................................................................ 511.3 Drainage of Rainwater ................................................................................................... 511.4 Buried Metallic Storage Tanks ...................................................................................... 511.5 Partially Buried Metallic Tanks ..................................................................................... 511.6 Aboveground Tanks Testing and Inspection Protocols ............................................... 511.7 Internal Heating Coils .................................................................................................... 511.8 Overfill Prevention .......................................................................................................... 511.9 Effluent Discharge .......................................................................................................... 511.10 Visible Oil Leaks ............................................................................................................. 611.11 Mobile and Portable Oil Storage Tanks and Containers ............................................. 6

    12.0 FACILITY TRANSFER OPERATIONS ............................................................................................ 612.1 Buried Piping Installations ............................................................................................ 612.2 Idle Pipelines .................................................................................................................. 612.3 Pipe Supports .................................................................................................................. 6

  • AppendixB.2SPCCPPreliminaryOutline BergerABAMTesoroSavageVancouverEnergyDistributionTerminal 29August2013Vancouver,Washington Pageiiiofiii

    12.4 Aboveground Pipelines .................................................................................................. 612.5 Vehicular Traffic .............................................................................................................. 6

    13.0 RCRA HAZARDOUS WASTE CONTINGENCY PLAN .................................................................... 613.1 Description of Hazardous Wastes ................................................................................. 613.2 Description of Hazardous Waste Management Areas ................................................ 613.3 Emergency Coordinator Responsibilities ..................................................................... 613.4 Emergency Response Procedures ................................................................................ 613.5 Notification ..................................................................................................................... 613.6 Containment and Control during Emergencies ........................................................... 7

    13.6.1 Spills and Releases ........................................................................................... 713.6.2 Fires and Explosions .......................................................................................... 7

    13.7 Prevention of Recurrence .............................................................................................. 713.8 Emergency Equipment ................................................................................................... 7

    13.8.1 Spills and Releases ........................................................................................... 713.8.2 Fires and Explosions .......................................................................................... 7

    13.9 Post Emergency Procedures ......................................................................................... 713.9.1 Storage and Treatment ..................................................................................... 713.9.2 Equipment Decontamination and Maintenance ............................................. 713.9.3 Reporting ............................................................................................................ 7

    13.10 Evacuation Plan .............................................................................................................. 7 LIST OF APPENDICES Appendix A SPCCP Certification Appendix B Plan Amendments Appendix C Plan Review Sheet Appendix D SPCCP Training Records Appendix E Inspection Forms Appendix F Documentation and Notifications of Spills Appendix G Substantial Harm Criteria Checklist Appendix H Distribution List

  • AppendixB.2SPCCPPreliminaryOutline BergerABAMTesoroSavageVancouverEnergyDistributionTerminal August2013Vancouver,Washington Page1of8

    APPENDIX B.2 SPILL PREVENTION CONTROL AND COUNTERMEASURE PLAN (SPCCP) 1.0 INTRODUCTION AND FACILITY INFORMATION 1.1 Introduction

    Thissectionwillprovideanintroductionandwillidentifythefacilityelementssubjecttoregulationunder40CFR112.1.

    1.2 Name and Address of Facility

    Thissectionwillidentifythenameandlocationofthefacility.

    1.3 Type of Facility ThissectionwillidentifythetypeoffacilityaddressedbytheSPCCP.

    1.4 Location and Background

    Thissectionwilldescribethelocationofthefacilityandprovideahighleveloverviewofthefacilityelements,andcontainmentmeasuresincorporatedinfacilitydesign.

    2.0 PURPOSE AND SCOPE 2.1 Purpose

    ThissectionwilldescribethepurposeoftheSPCCP.2.2 Scope

    ThissectionwilldescribethescopeoftheSPCCP,andwillidentifyanycontractorsorresponsecooperativesthatwillalsoprovidesupportservicesforresponseactivities.

    2.3 Location of SPCCP

    Inaccordancewith40CFR112.3(e),thissectionwillidentifywheretheSPCCPwillbeavailableforonsitereview,andwhereadditionalcopieswillbekept.

    2.4 Spill Events Requiring Written Reports

    Inaccordancewith40CFR112.4,thissectionwillidentifythethresholdsforreportingspillincidents,whenthereport(s)havetobesubmittedandtheircontents.ThissectionwillalsoidentifyconditionsunderwhichtheEPARegionalAdministratorcanrequestthattheSPCCPbeamended,andtheprocessforamendmentpursuanttosucharequest.

    2.5 SPCCP Review and Amendment Requirements

    Inaccordancewith40CFR112.5,thissectionwilladdresstheconditionsthatwilltriggeranamendmentoftheSPCCP,SPCCPreviewevaluationeveryfiveyears,anddocumentationandcertificationbyaprofessionalengineerofsuchamendments.

  • AppendixB.2SPCCPPreliminaryOutline BergerABAMTesoroSavageVancouverEnergyDistributionTerminal August2013Vancouver,Washington Page2of8

    2.6 Plan Conformance Inaccordancewith40CFR112.7(a)(1),thissectionwillidentifyhowtheSPCCPconformswiththerequirementsof40CFR112,andwilldiscussinterrelationshipifthisSPCCPwiththeFacilityResponsePlan.

    2.6.1 Conformance with Other Regulations Inaccordancewith40CFR112.7and112.8,thissectionwillidentifyhowtheSPCCPconformswiththerequirementsofstaterules,regulations,andguidelines,iftheyaremorestringentthanthefederalSPCCPrequirements,e.g.: WashingtonDepartmentofEcologyFacilityContingencyPlanandResponse

    ContractorStandards(WAC173181),whichincludesnotificationandspillresponserequirements;

    TheWashingtonDangerousWaste(WAC173303145)regulations,whichspecifyrequirementsfornotificationsofspillsanddischargesofhazardoussubstances.Specifically,spillsordischargesofhazardoussubstancesthatthreatenhumanhealthortheenvironmentalmustbereportedtolocalandstateauthorities;

    TheU.S.CoastGuard(33CFRI54.310)andWashington(WAC173180(B))facilityOperationsManualrequirements.

    TheCityofVancouverWaterResourcesProtectionOrdinance(VMCChapter14.26).

    3.0 FACILITY LAYOUT AND DESCRIPTION Inaccordancewith40CFR112.7(a)(3),thissectionwilldescribetheFacilityoperations,subdividedafollowsforthevariousfacilityareas:

    3.1 Area 200 Unloading 3.2 Area 300 Storage 3.3 Area 400 Marine Terminal 3.4 Area 500 Transfer Pipelines 3.5 Area 600 West Boiler Building 4.0 EQUIPMENT FAILURE

    Inaccordancewith40CFR112.7(b)thissection,anditssubsections,willdescribepotentialspillscenariosforeachoftheFacilityAreas,containmentmeasuresincludedindesign,responseequipmentprovided,andadditionalresponsesupportavailabletorespondtoeachspillscenario.

    4.1 Area 200 Unloading 4.2 Area 300 Storage

  • AppendixB.2SPCCPPreliminaryOutline BergerABAMTesoroSavageVancouverEnergyDistributionTerminal August2013Vancouver,Washington Page3of8

    4.3 Area 400 Marine Terminal 4.4 Area 500 Transfer Pipelines 4.5 Area 600 West Boiler Building

    5.0 STRUCTURAL CONTAINMENT SYSTEMS

    Inaccordancewith40CFR112.7(c),thissectionwilladdressthestructuralcontainmentsystemsimplementedattheFacility,asapplicable.

    5.1 Dikes, Berms, and Walls

    40CFR112.7(c)(1)(i)5.2 Curbing

    40CFR112.7(c)(1)(ii)5.3 Drainage Systems

    40CFR112.7(c)(1)(iii)5.4 Weirs, Booms, or Other Barriers

    40CFR112.7(c)(1)(iv)5.5 Spill Diversion Ponds

    40CFR112.7(c)(1)(v)5.6 Spill Retention Ponds

    40CFR112.7(c)(1)(vi)5.7 Sorbent Materials and Additional Mobile Containment Systems

    40CFR112.7(c)(1)(vii)6.0 INSPECTION RECORDS

    Inaccordancewith40CFR112.7(e),thissectionwilldescribethefrequencyofinspectionsforevidenceofspills,leaks,corrosion,faultyequipment,anddangeroussituations,thestandardstowhichtheinspectionsareconducted,andwhereinspectionrecordsareretained.Itisanticipatedthatthefollowingwillbeaddressedinthissection:

    6.1 Aboveground Tank and Piping Inspection 6.2 Secondary Containment Inspection and Monitoring 6.3 Marine Terminal Loading Inspection

  • AppendixB.2SPCCPPreliminaryOutline BergerABAMTesoroSavageVancouverEnergyDistributionTerminal August2013Vancouver,Washington Page4of8

    7.0 PERSONNEL TRAINING AND SPILL PREVENTION PROCEDURES Inaccordancewith40CFR112.7(f),thissectionwilldescribespillpreventiontraining,personnelsupervision,facilityinspections,equipmentmaintenance,facilitysecurity,andspecificengineeringcontrolsandpractices.Thissectionwillalsoidentifyotherdocumentsthataddressspillpreventionandoperationsprocedures.

    7.1 Personnel Training

    40CFR112.7(f)(1)7.2 Supervision

    40CFR112.7(f)(2)7.3 Spill Prevention Briefings

    40CFR112.7(f)(3)8.0 SECURITY

    Inaccordancewith40CFR112.7(g),thissectionwilldescribemeasuresimplementedtoensurefacilitysecurity.

    9.0 FACILITY UNLOADING RACKS Inaccordancewith40CFR112.7(h),thissectionwilldescribethefacilitiesrelatedtotankercarunloading,containmentmeasuresprovided,controlsandprocessesimplementedtopreventreleases,proceduresimplementedduringtheunloadingactivity,andinspectionprocedures.

    9.1 Unloading Procedures

    40CFR112.7(h)(1)9.2 Spill Containment Systems

    40CFR112.7(h)(1)

    9.3 Warning Devices 40CFR112.7(h)(2)

    9.4 Brittle Fracture 40CFR112.7(i)

    10.0 SUPPLEMENTAL REQUIREMENTS FOR ONSHORE FACILITIES Inaccordancewith40CFR112.8,thissectionwilldescribehowdrainagefromdikedandnondikedareasisrestrainedtopreventaspillofoilfromexcessiveleakingintothefacilitydrainagesystem.Thissectionisanticipatedtoaddress:

    10.1 Drainage from Diked Storage Areas

    40CFR112.8(b)(1)

  • AppendixB.2SPCCPPreliminaryOutline BergerABAMTesoroSavageVancouverEnergyDistributionTerminal August2013Vancouver,Washington Page5of8

    10.2 Flapper-Type Drain Valves

    40CFR112.8(b)(2)10.3 Drainage from Undiked Areas

    40CFR112.8(b)(3)10.4 Diversion System

    40CFR112.8(b)(4)10.5 Natural Hydraulic Flow

    40CFR112.8(b)(5)11.0 BULK STORAGE TANK AND CONTAINERS

    Inaccordancewith40CFR112.8(c),thissectionwilladdressthedesignandconstructionofthebulkstoragetanks,inspectionprocedures,secondarycontainment,andtestingandinspectionprotocols,asfollows:

    11.1 Tank Construction

    40CFR112.8(c)(1)11.2 Secondary Containment

    40CFR112.8(c)(2)11.3 Drainage of Rainwater

    40CFR112.8(c)(3)11.4 Buried Metallic Storage Tanks

    40CFR112.8(c)(4)

    11.5 Partially Buried Metallic Tanks 40CFR112.8(c)(5)

    11.6 Aboveground Tanks Testing and Inspection Protocols 40CFR112.8(c)(6)

    11.7 Internal Heating Coils

    40CFR112.8(c)(7)11.8 Overfill Prevention

    40CFR112.8(c)(8)11.9 Effluent Discharge

    40CFR112.8(c)(9)

  • AppendixB.2SPCCPPreliminaryOutline BergerABAMTesoroSavageVancouverEnergyDistributionTerminal August2013Vancouver,Washington Page6of8

    11.10 Visible Oil Leaks

    40CFR112.8(c)(10)

    11.11 Mobile and Portable Oil Storage Tanks and Containers 40CFR112.8(c)(11)

    12.0 FACILITY TRANSFER OPERATIONS

    Inaccordancewith40CFR112.8(d),thissectionwilldescribetransferoperationsinvolvingpipingandpipelines,includingconstructionmethods,protectionfromcorrosion,andexaminationmethods.Thissectionwilladdress:

    12.1 Buried Piping Installations

    40CFR112.8(d)(1)12.2 Idle Pipelines

    40CFR112.8(d)(2)12.3 Pipe Supports

    40CFR112.8(d)(3)12.4 Aboveground Pipelines

    40CFR112.8(d)(4)

    12.5 Vehicular Traffic 40CFR112.8(d)(5)

    13.0 RCRA HAZARDOUS WASTE CONTINGENCY PLAN Thissectionwilldescribehazardouswastesthatcouldbegeneratedatthefacility,howandwheretheyaremanaged,emergencycoordinationresponsibilitiesandprocedures,notificationrequirementsintheeventofareleaseandcontainmentandcontrolduringemergencies,recurrencepreventionmeasures,andpostemergencyprocedures.Thissectionisanticipatedtocontainthefollowingsubsections:

    13.1 Description