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Crop Report #24 - October 1 to 7, 2019 - complete · PDF file moisture is rated as 14 per cent surplus, 82 per cent adequate, three per cent short and one per cent very short. Crop

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Text of Crop Report #24 - October 1 to 7, 2019 - complete · PDF file moisture is rated as 14 per cent...

  • Crop Report For the Period October 1 to October 7, 2019

    Published by the Ministry of Agriculture ISSN 0701 7085 Report number 24, October 10, 2019

    For further information, contact Cory Jacob, PAg, Crops Extension Specialist, Regional Services Branch,

    Toll Free: 1-866-457-2377 or 306-694-3587, Email: [email protected] Also available on the Ministry of Agriculture website at saskatchewan.ca/crop-report.

    Many producers were able to return to the field last week and 55 per cent of the crop is now in the bin. This is up from 47 per cent last week but remains well behind the five-year (2014-2018) average of 82 per cent for this time of year. Twenty-nine per cent of the crop is swathed or ready to straight-cut. Wet, cool weather continues to slow progress in much of the province. Much of the crop harvested so far is tough or damp and is being put into grain dryers and aeration bins. Warm, dry and windy days are needed soon so that producers can return to the field. All regions in the province progressed with harvest this past week. Harvest is most advanced in the southwest region, where 71 per cent of the crop is now combined. The northeast region has 61 per cent combined, the west-central region 58 per cent and the southeastern region 55 per cent. The northwest region has 42 per cent combined and the east-central region 39 per cent. Seventy-six per cent of the barley, 59 per cent of the durum, 58 per cent of the mustard, 52 per cent of the spring wheat, 50 per cent of the canary seed and oats, 40 per cent of the canola, 39 per cent of the chickpeas, 28 per cent of the soybeans and nine per cent of the

    flax is now in the bin. An additional 48 per cent of the canola and 19 per cent of the mustard is swathed or ready to straight- cut. Estimated average crop yields for the province are 39 bushels per acre for field peas; 1,413 pounds per acre for lentils; 38 bushels per acre for canola; 23 bushels per acre for flax; 40 bushels per acre for durum; 44 bushels per acre for spring wheat and 65 bushels per acre for barley. Fourteen per cent of the spring wheat is estimated to grade 1CW, while 32 and 27 per cent is estimated to grade 2CW and 3CW, respectively. Most areas of the province received some precipitation last week. The Moosomin area reported 20 mm, while the Elfros and Bethune areas received 16 mm. Across the province, topsoil moisture conditions on cropland are rated as 15 per cent surplus, 52 per cent adequate, 30 per cent sort and three per cent very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil

    One year ago Seventy-eight per cent of the 2018 crop had been combined. Wet and cool

    weather continued to slow harvest progress. Much of the crop was coming off

    tough and was being placed into grain dryers.

    Follow the 2019 Crop Report on Twitter @SKAgriculture

    Harvest Progress in SK Per cent Combined

    All Crops Oct 7/19 55

    Five-year avg. (2014-2018) 82

    Oct 8/18 78 Oct 9/17 94 Oct 3/16 80 Oct 5/15 84 Oct 6/14 72

    10-year avg. (2009-2018) 83

    Saskatchewan Harvest October 7, 2019

    Per cent combined Winter wheat* 98 Fall rye** 96 Spring wheat 52 Durum 59 Oats*** 50 Barley** 76 Canaryseed 50 Flax 9 Canola 40 Mustard 58 Soybeans 28 Lentils 93 Peas 94 Chickpeas 39 *includes three per cent ‘other’ **includes five per cent ‘other’ ***includes 10 per cent ‘other’

  • moisture is rated as 19 per cent surplus, 74 per cent adequate, six per cent short and one per cent very short. The majority of crop damage this past week was due to strong winds and frost. There continues to be many reports of crops sprouting, bleaching and staining and downgrading is expected at the elevator. Geese and wildlife are feeding on swathed crops and causing damage. Farmers are busy drying grain and waiting for the weather to improve so they can continue with harvest operations.

    Saskatchewan Harvest by Crop District October 7, 2019

    Crop District

    Per cent combined

    Crop District

    Per cent combined

    Crop District

    Per cent combined

    1A 54 4A 84 7A 67 1B 42 4B 76 7B 54 2A 61 5A 34 8A 74 2B 64 5B 35 8B 53

    3ASE 52 6A 46 9AE 53 3ASW 51 6B 53 9AW 39 3AN 67 9B 47 3BS 75 3BN 75

  • Southeastern Saskatchewan:  Crop District 1 – Carnduff, Estevan, Redvers, Moosomin and Kipling areas  Crop District 2 – Weyburn, Milestone, Moose Jaw, Regina and Qu’Appelle areas  Crop District 3ASE – Radville, Minton and Lake Alma areas

    Some harvest progress was made in the region last thanks to a few days of favorable weather. Fifty-five per cent of the crop is now in the bin, up from 46 per cent last week but well behind the five-year (2014-2018) average of 87 per cent for this time of year. An additional 25 per cent of the crop is swathed or ready to straight-cut. Most of the grain has come off is tough or damp and being placed into dryers. A good few weeks of warm, dry and windy weather is needed to complete harvest.

    Many areas received varying amounts of rain last week. Regionally, precipitation ranged from trace amounts to 20 mm in the Moosomin area. The Carnduff area received 11 mm, the Frobisher and Tantallon areas seven mm, the Alida and Glenavon areas four mm, the Weyburn and Radville areas two mm and the Indian Head area six mm. The Moosomin area has received the most precipitation since April 1 (522 mm).

    Topsoil moisture conditions in the region improved this past week, but there are still reports of many saturated fields. Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 31 per cent surplus, 46 per cent adequate and 23 per cent short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture conditions are rated as 41 per cent surplus and 59 per cent adequate. Crop District 1A is reporting that 33 per cent of the cropland and 60 per cent of the hay land and pasture currently has surplus topsoil moisture.

    Most crop damage this past week was due to frost and strong winds. There continues to be many reports of downgrading at the elevator due to sprouting, bleaching and staining. There are also reports of piebald in some wheat crops and of geese and wildlife feeding on swathed crops.

    Producers are busy drying grain and waiting for the weather to improve so they can continue harvest operations and fall field work.

    Southwestern Saskatchewan:  Crop District 3ASW – Coronach, Assiniboia and Ogema areas  Crop District 3AN – Gravelbourg, Mossbank, Mortlach and Central Butte areas  Crop District 3B – Kyle, Swift Current, Shaunavon and Ponteix areas  Crop District 4 – Consul, Maple Creek and Leader areas

    Producers in the southwestern region made some harvest progress last week. Seventy- one per cent of the crop is now in the bin, up from 68 per cent last week but remaining behind the five-year (2014-2018) average of 89 per cent for this time of year. An additional 12 per cent of the crop is swathed or ready to straight-cut. Most of the grain that has come off tough or damp is being placed into dryers. A couple of weeks of warm, dry and windy weather is needed to get the rest of the crop off.

    Small amounts of precipitation were received throughout some of the region. Precipitation ranged from trace amounts to 10 mm in the Gravelbourg area. The Fife Lake and Gull Lake areas received four mm and the Tyner area three mm. The area south-west of Moose Jaw has received the most precipitation since April 1 (579 mm).

  • Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 16 per cent surplus, 53 per cent adequate, 28 per cent short and three per cent very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture conditions are rated as 22 per cent surplus, 73 per cent adequate and five per cent short. Crop District 4B is reporting that 33 per cent of the cropland and 10 per cent of the hay and pasture land has surplus topsoil moisture at this time.

    The majority of crop damage this past week was due to strong winds, hail and frost. There continues to be reports of downgrading at the elevator due to sprouting and bleaching. Geese and other wildlife have also been feeding on swathed crops. Much of the crop that has come off is tough and is being dried as time and space permits.

    Producers are busy drying grain and waiting for the weather to improve so they can continue with harvest operations and fall field work.

    East-Central Saskatchewan:  Crop District 5 – Melville, Yorkton, Cupar, Kamsack, Foam Lake, Preeceville and

    Kelvington areas  Crop District 6A – Lumsden, Craik, Watrous and Clavet areas

    Another week of unfavorable weather conditions kept the harvest window to a few days last week. Despite the weather, producers in the region were able to get some crop harvested. Thirty-nine per cent of the crop is now combined, up from 33 per cent last week but remaining well behind the five-year (2014-2018) average of 73 per cent for this time of year. An additional 41 per cent of the crop is swathed or ready to straight-cut. Most of the grain that has come off is tough or damp and being placed into dryers. A long stretch of warm, dry and windy weather is needed to get the rest of the crop off.

    In the region, precipitation ranged from small amounts to 16 mm in the Bethune and Elfros areas. The Rocanville area received 10 mm of rain, the Goodeve area nine mm, the Foam Lake and Pelly areas eight mm, the Earl Grey area seven mm, the Craven and Yorkton areas four mm and the area south of Humboldt three mm. The Lipton area has received the most precipitation since April 1 (605 mm) for both the region and the province.

    Topsoil m