CAVE ART DBQ WHY WAS PREHISTORIC CAVE ART CREATED?

  • Published on
    26-Dec-2015

  • View
    218

  • Download
    2

Embed Size (px)

Transcript

  • Slide 1
  • Slide 2
  • CAVE ART DBQ WHY WAS PREHISTORIC CAVE ART CREATED?
  • Slide 3
  • WHAT ARE WE GOING TO DO? We are going to do our first DBQ, but a partial one. At the same time we will be doing historical analysis as a class and try to figure out why prehistoric humans did cave art. We will do this by following the steps that historians take: pondering a question, looking at and evaluating primary and secondary documents and submitting our theories for examination by other historians.
  • Slide 4
  • HOW WILL WE BE GRADED? On your partial essay on the topic following the partial-DBQ format: 4 Use all docs 4 Support thesis persuasively with appropriate evidence from docs 4 Understand meaning of documents be insightful and careful 4 Group documents in 1-3 ways (comparing or synthesizing)
  • Slide 5
  • HOW TO START A DBQ 4 First read the question and understand it. 4 Second read the documents and try to synthesize them. 4 Third begin grouping the documents while considering your thesis. 4 Fourth formulate your thesis using the groupings as arguments to support your thesis.
  • Slide 6
  • How would you group these shoes?
  • Slide 7
  • Possible groupings and groups 4 Color: white, black, brown 4 Purpose: exercise, work, relaxation 4 Type: sandals, tennis shoes, flip flops, pumps 4 Material: leather, fake leather, plastic 4 Owner: Mrs. Bond-Lamberty, Mr. Bond- Lamberty 4 Other ideas: age, cleanliness, size, comfort
  • Slide 8
  • DOCUMENT #1 LASCAUX CAVE
  • Slide 9
  • Lascaux Cave #1
  • Slide 10
  • Lascaux Cave #2
  • Slide 11
  • Lascaux Cave #3
  • Slide 12
  • DOCUMENT #2 LASCAUX CAVE 2
  • Slide 13
  • Lascaux Cave #4
  • Slide 14
  • Lascaux Cave #5
  • Slide 15
  • DOCUMENT #3 CHAUVET CAVE
  • Slide 16
  • Chauvet Cave #1
  • Slide 17
  • Chauvet Cave #2
  • Slide 18
  • Chauvet Cave #3
  • Slide 19
  • Chauvet Cave #4
  • Slide 20
  • Chauvet Cave #5
  • Slide 21
  • DOCUMENT #4 CHAUVET CAVE
  • Slide 22
  • Chauvet Cave #6
  • Slide 23
  • Slide 24
  • Chauvet Cave #7
  • Slide 25
  • DOCUMENT #5 CHAUVET CAVE
  • Slide 26
  • Chauvet Cave #8
  • Slide 27
  • Chauvet Cave #9
  • Slide 28
  • DOCUMENT #6 COSQUER CAVE
  • Slide 29
  • Cosquer Cave - Side View
  • Slide 30
  • Cosquer Cave #1
  • Slide 31
  • Cosquer Cave #2
  • Slide 32
  • Cosquer Cave #3
  • Slide 33
  • Cosquer Cave #4
  • Slide 34
  • DOCUMENT #7 COSQUER CAVE
  • Slide 35
  • Cosquer Cave #5
  • Slide 36
  • Cosquer Cave #6
  • Slide 37
  • DOCUMENT #8 CUSSAC CAVE
  • Slide 38
  • Cussac Cave #1
  • Slide 39
  • Cussac Cave #2
  • Slide 40
  • Cussac Cave #3
  • Slide 41
  • DOCUMENT #9 - Secrets of the Caves Art by Sharon Begley with Dana Thomas in Newsweek May 24, 1999 "Out of these people's whole bestiary, the artists chose predatory, dangerous animals," says archeologist Margaret Conkey of the University of California, Berkeley. By painting species that virtually never wound up on the Paleolithic menu but which "symbolized danger, strength and power," says Clottes, the artists may have been attempting "to capture the essence of" the animals.
  • Slide 42
  • DOCUMENT #9 (continued) A program superimposed arrays of hands onto the dots [found on one of the walls]. The best fit to an array of 48 dots is a sequence of handprints made by an adolescent or a short woman. A panel of 92 dots was probably the handiwork of a tall man. The presence of people of different ages and sexes suggests either a communal experience or masters passing their secrets on to apprentices. Even 32,000 years ago, art was created for more than art's sake.
  • Slide 43
  • DOCUMENT #10 - BEHOLD THE STONE AGE by Robert Hughes in TIME February 13, 1995 Some animals have more than four legs, or grotesquely exaggerated horns; is that just style, or does it argue a state of ritual trance or hallucination in the artists? No answer, though some naturally occurring manganese oxides, the base of some of the blacks used in cave paintings, are known to be toxic and to act on the central nervous system.
  • Slide 44
  • DOCUMENT #10 (continued) And the main technique of Cro-Magnon art, according to prehistorian Michel Lorblanchet, director of France's National Center of Scientific Research, involved not brushes but a kind of oral spray-painting - blowing pigment dissolved in saliva on the wall. Lorblanchet, who has re-created cave paintings with uncanny accuracy, suggests that the technique may have had a spiritual dimension.
  • Slide 45
  • Cave Art DBQ Possible Groupings 4 Types of images: dangerous animals, harmless animals, edible animals, inedible animals, land animals, sea animals, hand prints, humans, action scenes, still lifes, individual animals, groups of animals 4 Types of art: paintings, drawings, engravings, handprints
  • Slide 46
  • Cave Art DBQ Possible Groupings 4 Purpose: journal, education, prayer, communication 4 Theories: to get animals power, for art, spiritual aspect/hallucination, communal activity
  • Slide 47
  • Cave Art DBQ Possible Theses 4 There are many reasons why early humans did cave art, the most plausible are for spiritual motives, as a communal activity, and for art. [Spiritual hallucination (4, 7, 10), power (2, 3, 9); Communal 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9; Art painting (1, 2), carving (5, 8), drawing (1, 2, 3, 6), and spray painting (4, 7, 10)]. 4 Early humans created cave art for various reasons including as a means of communication, education and spirituality. [Communication I was here; education beware, eat these; spirituality power, prayer, hope]. 4 Cave art was done by early humans as a means of recording their environment, expressing their hopes; and to pass the time. [Recording what seen, time, events; expressing hopes, fears; passing - boredom].