Final Thinking Maps Cil 701

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    22-Apr-2015

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  • 1. Thinking Maps Marie Barker Christina Bentheim Kathy Gostomski
  • 2. 80% of all information that comes into our brain is VISUAL 40% of all nerve fibers connected to the brain are linked to the retina 36,000 visual messages per hour may be registered by the eyes. - Eric Jensen, Brain Based Learning
  • 3. What are Thinking Maps?
  • 4. Psychological Foundation
    • Based on eight cognitive skills
    • Each cognitive skill has a specific map to aid students in organizing their thinking in a visual and concrete way.
  • 5. Circle Map for Defining in Context
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  • 7.
  • 8. 0 + 6 6 1 + 5 5 + 1 4 + 2 3 + 3 2 + 4 6 + 0
  • 9.
  • 10. ? sideburns scarves Cadillac May still be alive
  • 11.
  • 12. Tree Map for classifying and grouping
  • 13.
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  • 16. Bubble Map for describing with adjectives
  • 17.
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  • 19. Double Bubble for comparing and contrasting
  • 20.
  • 21. Brace Map For Identifying Part/Whole Relationships
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  • 24. Flow Map For Sequencing and Ordering
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  • 31. Multi-Flow Map For Analyzing Causes and Effects
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  • 36. Bridge Map For Seeing Analogies
  • 37.
  • 38.
  • 39. The Scarlet Ibis Animals as Symbols
  • 40.
  • 41. Historical Context
      • Advance organizers came about in the 1960s with Ausubel and the Discovery learning movement
      • Graphic organizers came onto educational scene during the 1980s
      • Hyerle decided to take it one step further and create the same tools for specific cognitive skills in the mid-1990s
  • 42. Philosophical Perspectives
      • Students need to be taught how to organize thinking
      • Students and teachers need to speak a common visual language
  • 43. Research Base
      • No published peer-reviewed studies to date
        • All are masters theses or doctoral dissertations OR articles and books written by Hyerle, himself
      • When a doctoral student approached Hyerle to conduct a study, he presented two reservations
  • 44. Hyerles Reasons to Limit Research
    • If the prescribed program procedures are not consistently followed, it might skew the results of the study.
    • Seven months is not an adequate amount of time to conduct a study. It can take years to see effects from the use of Thinking Maps.
  • 45. Effectiveness of Method and Rationale
      • Peer-reviewed research is needed
      • What specifically makes the expensive Thinking Maps more effective than inexpensive graphic organizers?
      • Is it just another next best thing?
      • Ineffective when every teacher is not trained properly or provided with proper training materials

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