Why Learn about Form? Learning about types of Form is an important part of learning about Art. When we talk about Form, we are talking about three-dimensional.

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    25-Dec-2015

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  • Slide 1
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  • Why Learn about Form? Learning about types of Form is an important part of learning about Art. When we talk about Form, we are talking about three-dimensional objects. Three dimensional (3-D) objects are all around you the ones you can pick up, touch, and move around ~ are three dimensional. Forms are shapes that have a third dimension called, Depth : Cubes, Prisms, Pyramids, Spheres, Cones and Cylinders are examples of different kinds of Form.
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  • Forms have length, width, height, depth, and volume Shapes have height and width
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  • Before we learn about Form, lets review Shape! Two-Dimensional shape is: A flat plane Its two dimensions are length and width Circles, squares, rectangles and triangles are examples of two dimensional shapes
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  • Two Dimensional (2-D) Shape occurs only in theory: If you can hold a shape it is a form that has length, width height, depth and volume! It is three dimensional (3-D)
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  • Shape can be geometric Shape can be organic Shape can be abstract Shape can be positive Shape can be negative
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  • Form describes objects that are three- dimensional ~ having length, width, and height. A two-dimensional shape can be seen from only one side. A three dimensional form can be viewed from many sides. Forms take up space, whether they are from nature (organic), or made by man. Shape Form
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  • Can you name the two dimensional shapes that make up these forms? Cube = Pyramid = Sphere = Cone = Cylinder = Prism ? = Triangle, hexagon, rectangle (Any geometric shape with straight edges) Square Circle Circle, Triangle Triangle Circle, Rectangle
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  • Forms are either Natural (Organic) or Geometric Leaves have Natural Form This sculpture was made with geometric shapes (circles) These circles have Geometric Form
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  • Oh yeah, Organic shapes have edges that are freeform and irregular! Organic (Natural) Forms have length, width, height, depth, and volume. They have edges that are freeform and irregular. Trees, pebbles and flowers are all Natural (Organic) Forms
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  • Examples of Natural (Organic) Forms Rock Form Water Form Shrub Form Ice Form Cloud Formation
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  • Geometric Forms have height, width, length, depth, and volume. They have hard edges and are precise and regular: triangles, squares, circles, and rectangles, are geometric forms. Geometric Forms can be natural or man made. Snowflakes and salt crystals are examples of geometric form found in nature. Cardboard boxes and basketballs are examples of geometric form that is man made.
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  • Sooo, Geometric Form must be made from geometric shape, BUT have length, width, depth and volume! Remember what we learned from Mrs. Fisher, Alice? Geometric shapes have hard edges and are precise and regular: triangles, squares, circles, and rectangles, are geometric shapes!
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  • Humans create geometric and organic form Buildings Automobiles Pyramids Drums
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  • Almost everything around you is some kind of form ~ either natural or geometric Rocks are one example of natural or organic form. If you want to draw or paint such forms, you can show their depth by making shadows on and around them. By using a variety of values you can transform a simple shape into a form. Different values create contrast between light and dark shades. This contour pencil drawing shows the outline shape of a rock. This shaded pencil drawing of rock creates value through contrast. Shading creates value through contrast
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  • You can transform a two-dimensional shape to look like a three- dimensional form by adding texture and shadows. Identify the light source, and shade the shapes to appear as forms. They should appear to have the qualities of a form, which are: 3-dimensional, and have length, width, and height. If you use a variety of values you can alter a simple shape into a form. Different values create contrast between light and dark shades.
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  • There are Forms in Art This Barbara Hepworth (1903-1975) sculpture is made from wood Jeremy Mayer creates his sculptures from old typewriter parts Alexander Calder (1898-1976) made this mobile from sheet metal Some artists express their ideas by creating three-dimensional sculptures. They use many types of materials to create their art.
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  • This sculpture was made by Dale Chihuly (b. 1941) and is made of organic shapes This stained glass window was made with geometric shapes Artists use both geometric and organic shapes to create art.
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  • Sometimes artists use a combination of both geometric and organic forms to create their artwork. Tera Twist II 2007, by Vladimir Bulatov Red Cascade 1954, By Alexander Calder
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  • Sculpture can be abstract: Abstract Forms are simplified, three dimensional objects that we can sometimes recognize, but which may not look real. They simplify natural forms to their essential basic characteristics.
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  • Sculpture can be realistic: Realistic Forms depict people, animals, birds, and plants as they may actually appear. They are three dimensional things that we can recognize, because they resemble the images we know from life.
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  • This sculpture is an example of three-dimensional form. The seated figure takes up space, the spaces under, above, and around the sculpture are also important. The appearance of a sculpted form changes as we walk around it. The holes or negative space that are not part of the figure are as important to the sculpture as the form itself.
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  • When looking at Barbara Hepworths sculpture group, Assemblage of Sea Forms, we think of underwater rocks and other sea-sculpted forms. When exhibited, these can be rearranged from time to time, similar to the way that nature rearranges rocks on a beach. How does value contrast help you to feel the forms with your eyes?
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  • Space can be felt in Hepworths sculpture group because of the clustering and overlapping of forms. Space is a strong element in establishing a sense of form.
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  • Space can be felt between the forms in this grouping (even in a flat photograph). The space between and around objects helps us recognize and identify three-dimensional forms.
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  • The space inside a form is called: Volume Architecture is almost always made up of geometric forms which are cubes, pyramids, cones and cylinders. A building takes up space, but also has space inside it, which is called volume. Notice the contrast of geometric and natural (organic) forms in the photo of the Cadillac Junior High School building.