Thinking Maps Review Project. I can… I can appropriately use Thinking Maps as a learning tool to organize my thoughts. I can use Thinking Maps to demonstrate.

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<p>Hoot by Carl Hiaasen</p> <p>Thinking Maps Review Project</p> <p>I canI can appropriately use Thinking Maps as a learning tool to organize my thoughts.I can use Thinking Maps to demonstrate my understanding of the novel Something Rotten.I can summarize what I have read and cite textual evidence.I can collaborate effectively within any group.I can use a thinking map as a basis for writing a quality paragraph.</p> <p>The Big PictureWe will go over the entire assignment.As a class, we will create a Bridge Map.You will form groups of 4 and create a Flow Map, Bubble Map, Double Bubble Map, and a Brace Map.Independently, you will create a Multi-Flow Map.Independently, you will write a Quality Paragraph based on your Multi-Flow Map.</p> <p>Something Rotten Thinking Map Checklist Each group member is responsible for turning in 3 different thinking maps. To help your group stay organized, check off each task as you complete them. </p> <p> Bridge Map (everyone has his/her own) Flow Map (Created by: _________________) Bubble Map (Created by: _________________) Brace Map (Created by: _________________) Double Bubble Map (Created by: _________________) Multi Flow Map (everyone has his/her own)VocabularyPlease open your binder to the Vocabulary section. You can format this any way you want.Terms to add:Thinking Maps remindersBridge mapFlow map Bubble mapDouble Bubble mapBrace MapMulti-flow mapWhenever you see this guy, you should probably be writing something down.</p> <p>Thinking Maps RemindersWrite your thoughts first. Then enclose your words in the appropriate shape (circle, square, you choose).Pay attention to the direction of your lines or arrows.Include a frame of reference.Use color purposefully.</p> <p>Bridge Map (Conflict)Used to show relationships or analogies. They must always have a relating factor.Create a Bridge Map of the various conflicts that arise in the novel. Decide if the conflicts are:Man vs. manMan vs. selfMan vs. societyMan vs. the environment or nature</p> <p>We will do this as a class.Something Rotten by Alan GratzRF: is an example of aWhich conflict(s) have the greatest impact on the plot? ***EVERY conflict needs a page number. ***Include a citation for at least TWO CONFLICTS.Flow Map (Plot)Used for sequencing or to put things in order.</p> <p>Create a Flow Map of the plot sequencing Horatios attempts to solve the murder mystery.</p> <p>One member of you group will choose this.Based on the events in your map, what conclusions can you draw about Horatio? Something Rotten by Alan GratzExposition</p> <p>EventRising Action</p> <p>EventRising Action</p> <p>EventRising Action</p> <p>EventClimax</p> <p>EventClimax</p> <p>EventFalling Action</p> <p>EventFalling Action</p> <p>EventResolution</p> <p>EventResolution</p> <p>EventClimax</p> <p>Event***EVERY event needs a page number. ***Include citations for at least THREE EVENTS in your flow map.Double Bubble Map (Characterization)Used for comparing and contrastingCreate a Double Bubble Map to compare and contrast Horatio and Hamilton.Be sure to include characteristics beyond just their physical characteristics. Think about what their words, thoughts, and actions say about who they are.</p> <p>One member of you group will choose this.HamiltonHoratioSomething Rotten by Alan GratzWhat conclusions can you draw about the similarities and differences between Horatio andHamilton based on this map?Each bubble needs to be written in a complete sentence. At least 5 bubbles total need to Include properly cited textual evidence. Bubble Map (Characterization)Used for describing. Create a Bubble Map on a character of your choosing.Describe and/or draw the physical appearance and personality of the character.</p> <p>One member of you group will choose this.CharacterDescribe one aspect of your chosen characters personality. Include properly cited textual evidence. Each circle needs to be unique &amp; have a citation. Something Rotten by Alan GratzCan you connect this character to yourself or to another text?Based on your map, is this character someone you would want to be friends with? Explain why.Brace MapUsed to show whole-part relationships.Create a Brace Map of the setting of Something Rotten.Use both words and pictures. Support with at least 1 example of textual evidence.</p> <p>One member of you group will choose this.Denmark, TNElsinore paper plantHamiltons mansionCopenhagen RiverCommunity TheaterHow would the story have been different if it had been set somewhere else? Something Rotten by Alan GratzEach setting needs to include at least one citation of textual evidence. Multi-Flow Map (Significant Event)Used for determining the causes and effects of significant events. Select a significant event (turning point or defining moment) from your reading and examine why it happened and what happened as a result.Everyone will do this map independently.Based on your map, what life lesson(s) can the reader learn? Something Rotten by Alan GratzSignificant EventCite textual evidence and page numberCause</p> <p>Cite textual evidence and page numberCause</p> <p>Cite textual evidence and page numberCause</p> <p>Cite textual evidence and page numberEffect</p> <p>Cite textual evidence and page number</p> <p>Effect</p> <p>Cite textual evidence and page numberEffect</p> <p>Cite textual evidence and page numberBased on your map, what life lesson(s) can the reader learn? Something Rotten by Alan GratzSocrative QuizGo to www.socrative.comClassroom # 366539Take the quiz.</p>

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