Thinking Maps

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Thinking Maps. Thinking Maps Training April 14, 2010. The Multi-Flow Map. CAUSE AND EFFECT. Name the thought process:. We watched a video. The Multi-Flow Map. The Multi-Flow Map helps students identify the causes and effects of an event. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Text of Thinking Maps

  • Thinking Maps TrainingApril 14, 2010

  • The Multi-Flow MapCAUSE AND EFFECTName the thought process:

  • We watched a video.

  • The Multi-Flow Map The Multi-Flow Map helps students identify the causes and effects of an event.

    When constructing the map, always focus first on the event.

    The event is the key to this map. It must be a happening. The event should be the floodingof the Nile instead of just the Nile.

    A one-word event is possible Hurricane

    Event may also be a statement with a verb I went on a trip to Mexico.

  • The Multi-Flow MapThe causes and effects do not have to balance.

    Begin by identifying all the causes first and then the effects.

    Students may also construct a one-sided Multi-Flow.

  • Healthy TeethCausesEffects

  • Key Words and PhrasesCauses and effectsDiscuss the consequencesWhat would happen if ?If thenPredict Describe the changeIdentify the motivation behind Identify the results of What happened because of ?

  • Guiding Questions for the Multi-Flow MapWhat are the causes and effects of this event? Why did this event take place?What happened because of this event?What are the effects of this event?What was the motivation behind this event?What will be the results of this event?

  • Frame of Reference for Multi-Flow MapHow do you know what you know about the causes and effects of this event?What could be influencing how you are thinking about these causes and effects?Where did you get your information? What source(s) did you use to identify the causes and effects?Did a specific time period influence the causes and/or effects?

  • The Multi-Flow MapUseful With Real Life Experiences

  • When using the Multi-Flow Map with students it is beneficial tobegin with events that are in their immediate experience. Theteacher should take the opportunity to use this Map with eventssuch as a school fire/tornado/earthquake drill. All students will be able to understand, draw, and relate to the effects of the drill; however, only those at a higher level of ELD will be able to complete the causes.

    so

  • Adding Academic RigorWhat if the turtle didnt have a shell on its back. . .What if the leopard had short little legs. . .Then Then

  • Your TurnGet in groups of 2 - 4.

    Assign roles materials, recorder, reporter, task master

    Assignment:Materials person gets an eggGroup reads task and completes Materials person returns egg and gets a different eggGroup reads new task and completesRepeat again if time permits with a third egg

  • The Multi-Flow MapEvent/ LanguageCorrelation

  • Autumnarrived

    The event for a Multi-Flow Map will depend on the focus thatthe teacher chooses, as well as, the language that needs tobe articulated for the students. In each example above thefocus is on the same topic but one Map addresses effectsusing a simpler sentence structure, while the other focuseson the causes using a more complex sentence structure.Note the cause/effect language that is included on the Map.

  • The Multi-Flow MapCan Be ReadWith Varied Formsof LanguageThe fire bell rang. We went outside.The fire bell rang so we went outside.The fire bell rang so we went outside and waited.The fire bell rang so we went outside, waited, and did not talk.The fire bell rang; therefore, we went outside

  • When using the Multi-Flow Map with students it is beneficial tobegin with events that are in their immediate experience. Theteacher should take the opportunity to use this Map with eventssuch as a school fire/tornado/earthquake drill. All students will be able to understand, draw, and relate to the effects of the drill; however, only those at a higher level of ELD will be able to complete the causes.

    so

  • The Multi-Flow MapCan BeOne-Sideddepending onthe Focus

  • Multi-Flow Maps are not required to have both the causes andthe effects represented for every event. Whether or not to include both depends on the focus of the instruction as well as the importance or significance of each side of the Map.

    MotherTeresadied

  • The Multi-Flow MapCan Be adjustedto Reflect the causalthinking in TextAlmost everyone has heard the sound of a dog barking. Have you ever wondered why a dog barks? Sometimes dogs bark to greet their owners when they come home from work or school. They want the owner to know they are glad to see them at the end of the day. Many dogs also want to protect their owners so they might bark to tell the owner that a stranger is nearby. A dogs bark can also be a warning to the stranger to go away. While a barking dog can be annoying at times, it can also be a help to the owner and his family.

  • because

    When using the Multi-Flow Map with English Learners, it isimportant to write complete phrases as well as causal words so that the student can see the language while reading it. Thelanguage used will depend on the ELD level of the student.

    The dog wants to greet itsowner so it barks.

    The dog wants to scare strangers; therefore, it barks.

    Upper levels of ELD can experimentwith the Map and language: It barksbecause a dog wants to scare strangers.

  • The Multi-Flow MapSummarizing andSynthesizingInformationBig Idea

  • AWarOccurs

    Using the Multi-Flow Map can help the students to synthesizeinformation and to determine the big ideas. For example, afterstudying different wars and completing Multi-Flow Maps for each,the teacher would ask the students to look at the informationand to determine what might be causes/effects of any war.

  • The Multi-Flow MapPredicting

  • Multi-Flow Maps are useful tools for predicting while reading astory with students. During the reading the teacher would stop,record the event that has just occurred, and ask the studentsto predict what they think the effects of that event will be. To designate that it is a prediction rather than a fact, the teacher can draw thought bubbles beside each prediction.

    The wolfknocks onthe 1st littlepigs door

    The pig will notopen the door

    The pig will tell thewolf to go away

    The pig will openthe door

    Ari thinks

    LaToya thinks

    Ivan thinks

  • PREVIEWING THE TEXTPREDICTING BEFORE READINGA Volcano Erupts

  • TEXT FEATURESTo extend their thinking, students can construct a Multi-Flow Map to discuss the effects the author hoped to achieve by using specific text features.

  • Classroom Applications Using the Multi-Flow MapPredictingSummarizing andSynthesizingInformationCan Be AdjustedTo Reflect the CausalThinking in TextCan BeOne-SidedDepending onthe FocusCan Be ReadWith Varied Formsof LanguageUseful With RealLife ExperiencesEvent/ LanguageCorrelation

  • AssignmentIntroduce multi-flow maps in classroom instruction and bring at least one student sample of multi-flow maps used to:identify causes and effects of an eventpredict causes and/or effects of an eventIdentify what if then relationships Add a frame of referenceHow did you know what you know about the causes and effects of the event?Where did you get your information?What influenced the information in your map?What sources did you use to identify the causes and effects?

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