The Watchdog

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An online magazine for the Soldiers, Families and friends of the 8th Military Police Brigade

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  • THE WATCHDOG

    An online magazine for the Soldiers and Families of the 8th Military Police Brigade

    Vol. 1, June 2013

  • 8th

    Military

    Police Brigade

    Follow us on Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/8thMilitaryPoliceBrigade

    W

    atchdog Strong

    (Dont have a Facebook account? Dont worry! Its a public government page, and as such, does not require you to have a Facebook account to view!)

  • 8th

    Military

    Police Brigade

    In accordance with AR 360-1 and the regula-tions set forth by the U.S. Army Public Affairs Center, The Watchdog is an authorized publi-cation for members of the U.S. Army. Contents of The Watchdog are not necessarily official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Govern-ment, Department of Defense, Department of the Army, the 8th Theater Sustainment Com-mand or the 8th Military Police Brigade. All editorial content of The Watchdog is prepared, edited, provided and approved by the 8th Mili-tary Police Brigade Public Affairs Office. The 8th Military Police Brigade Public Affairs Office is located in Schofield Barracks, Hawaii.

    Commanding OfficerCol. Mark A. Jackson

    Command Sergeant MajorCommand Sgt. Maj. Richard A. Woodring

    Managing EditorStaff Sgt. Richard D. Sherba

    https://www.facebook.com/8thMilitaryPoliceBrigade

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    atchdog Strong

  • 8th MPs flex muscle; certify 71st CHEM

  • Story and Photos by Staff. Sgt. Richard D. Sherba

    8th MPs flex muscle; certify 71st CHEM

  • A loud bang disrupts a tranquil sunny morning in a training field located on Schofield Barracks. Help! Hurry! They went that way! Im sick! Theres another bomb, simultaneously screamed over 60 role-playing victims running from the explosion; while others fell down succumbing to their fake injuries.

    Chaos right? Not for the Soldiers of the 8th Military Police Brigade, 8th Theater Sustainment Command.

    In a display like none other, the 8th MP Bde. mobi-lized its diverse array of elements and assets in a Con-sequence Management Exercise held April 24 -25.

    MPs from the 728th Military Police Battalion, 8th MP Bde., were first on scene assessing the situation, secur-ing the area and calling for additional assets.

    Within minutes help was en route. Soldiers from the Special Reaction Team, 8th MP

    Bde. to search for and capture the role-playing suspects; EOD Soldiers from the 303rd Ordnance Battalion, 8th MP Bde., to diffuse a second bomb; firefighters from the Federal Fire Department to evacuate, triage, and identify hazardous materials; and Soldiers from the 71st Chemical Company, 8th MP Bde. to decontaminate the

    role-playing victims and area as well as conduct limited reconnaissance of the suspected contaminated sites and package evidence for law enforcement investigations.

    Brig. Gen. Peggy C. Combs, 27th Chief of Chemi-cal and Commandant of the U.S. Army Chemical, Bio-logical, Radiological and Nuclear School spent several days visiting with the 71st Chem. Co. and witnessed the fast paced and intense training exercise first hand.

    Well done by the exercise planners, well done by everyone here operating in an all hazards approach. Were thrilled to see the all hazards approach, thats where were going with our CBRN forces. The part-nership between MP, EOD and Chemical is going to be an enduring partnership and any time we can exercise that interoperability makes us better as an Army, said Combs.

    The two-day training event allowed for the diverse units involved to train and be evaluated on their unique skill sets; but its end result was the recertification of the 71st Chem. Co. on unit equipment and the ability of 71st Chem. Co. to perform its mission.

    The last two days of training is considered certifica-tion for our company, its basically certifying us to be

    SCHOFIELD BARRACKS, Hawaii Spc. Ashley Vigil, 3rd Platoon, 71st Chemical Company, 8th Military Police Brigade verifies Sgt. Angel Tejada, 3rd Plt., 71st Chem. Co., 8th MP Bde. can breathe prior to rolling out on a reconnaissance mission during a mass casualty decontamination portion of a Consequence Management Exercise April 24.

  • SCHOFIELD BARRACKS, Hawaii The Federal Fire Department uses a fire truck to conduct a hasty mass casualty decontamination on over 60 role-playing victims during joint training with the 8th Military Police Brigade. FFD was amongst the first responders on scene during a mass casualty decontamination portion of a two-day exercise put on by the 8th MP Bde. April 25.

  • readily available for deployment, said Sgt. Nichelle Bishop, 71st Chem. Co., 8th MP Bde.

    Bishop then commented on Combs presence during the week.

    She [Combs] got me fired up, she said were [Chem-ical Soldiers] not just an elite group by name but be-cause of what we do, how we train, and what were trained on, said Bishop. She also motivated us by letting us know were doing something that people may not think is important, but its so important given the world we live in. We are very needed at this time.

    Combs spoke about the 71st Chem. Co. certification exercise.

    I think the exercise was set up very well to test their capabilities to their limits of operational capacity, and the Soldiers are performing brilliantly. In this kind of environment, this kind of mission, were going to have capacity limitations and I like the fact that the exercise was set up to allow us to truly get an assess-ment of what that operational capacity really is, said Combs.

    As diverse and demanding as the training was, so

    was the weather. Day one brought heavy down pours, while day two brought high temperatures, humidity and the sun.

    It [weather] didnt matter. Our [71st Chem. Co.] set up time from yesterday in the pouring rain, with mud everywhere, was identical to the set up time today in nice sunny weather with no mud, said Sgt. 1st Class Hans Drupiewski, Platoon Sergeant, 2nd Platoon, 71st Chem. Co., 8th MP Bde. They [Soldiers] did great as a team, they were motivated, they came together and they accomplished the mission no matter the ele-ments.

    After the last simulated patient had been treated and Soldiers were allotted the opportunity to pause and catch their breath, Bishop took the time to reflect on the past two days of training and all the different ele-ments involved working together during the exercise.

    It was a good collaboration. Thats what the Army does, and thats what we [Army] do best. Having everyone and everything come together, it was awe-some. I could do this again and again and again, I love my job said Bishop.

    SCHOFIELD BARRACKS, Hawaii Soldiers from the 71st Chemical Company, 8th Military Police Brigade load role-playing pa-tients onto litters to be treated in a mass casualty decontamination shelter during a Consequence Management Exercise April 25.

  • SCHOFIELD BARRACKS, Hawaii Sgt. Jerald Harrell, 3rd Platoon, 71st Chemical Company, 8th Military Police Brigade as-sists Spc. Barron Demons, 3rd Plt., 71st Chem. Co., 8th MP Bde. in the donning of a self contained breathing apparatus. Demons, a member of a perimeter monitoring team, prepares to conduct a reconnaissance mission during a Consequence Management Exercise exercise April 24.

  • Pacific Chemical Ball 71st Chemical Companys Inaugural Pacific Green Dragon Chemical Ball

  • Pacific Chemical Ball 71st Chemical Companys Inaugural Pacific Green Dragon Chemical Ball

  • 728th MP Bn. inducts NCOs; upholds Army tradition

  • 728th MP Bn. inducts NCOs; upholds Army tradition

    Story and Photos by Staff. Sgt. Richard D. Sherba

  • The military is steeped in history and has many tra-ditions honoring that history; perhaps no tradition is as vital to the force as military ceremonies.

    The 728th Military Police Battalion, 8th Military Po-lice Brigade, 8th Theater Sustainment Command held a Noncommissioned Officer Induction Ceremony at Sgt. Smith Theatre, here May 14.

    Twenty-seven Soldiers were inducted into the Non-commissioned Officer Corps during a ceremony that not only honored the newly promoted Sergeants but also upheld Army tradition.

    In the back of the ceremonys program guide was an excerpt from The Army Noncommissioned Officer Guide containing a quote by Command Sgt. Maj. (re-tired) Joshua Perry, Regimental Command Sergeant Major, Military Police Corps.

    Some of the old Soldiers out there, who have perhaps grown a bit cynical and too sophisticated for ceremo-nies, think you have the option to decline a ceremony for yourself, as quoted by Perry. A military ceremony is not yours, even if you are the sole reason for the cer-emony. It belongs to all the Soldiers.

    Command Sgt. Maj. Bradley Cross, battalion com-mand sergeant major, 728th MP Bn., didnt just come across Perrys words and have them placed in the pro-gram guide as a reminder to his Soldiers; he witnessed Perrys words first-hand as a young private, 23 years ago, and has lived those words ever since.

    I remember being in basic training and a big statured man [Perry] standing out front [of the formation] say-ing just that, those same words, said Cross.

    The big statured man of course was Command Sgt. Maj. (retired) Joshua Perry.

    The most selfless part of being a leader is supporting

    these types of events, said Cross.He then added, the goal of the tradition of having an

    induction ceremony like this is youve got to let them [inductees] know there is a clear line that has been marked in the sand and you [newly promoted sergeants] just stepped over that line. Now youre a noncommis-sioned officer. There are expectations, you have to lead and youre expected to lead.

    Sgt. Nichelle Bishop,