The Sonnet Understanding and Appreciation of the sonnet form ‘Sonetto’ – Little Song (Italian)

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<ul><li><p>The SonnetUnderstanding and Appreciation of the sonnet formSonetto Little Song (Italian)</p><p>Click to edit Master text styles Second level Third level Fourth level Fifth level</p><p>Learning OutcomesI can identify a sonnet poem and explain what the key features are.I can write a critical essay which compares and contrasts two examples of sonnet poetry.I can discuss thoughtfully a range of sonnet poems and demonstrate some knowledge of their writers.</p><p>Click to edit Master text styles Second level Third level Fourth level Fifth level</p><p>Key Areas for StudySonnet as form: rhythm, rhyme &amp; structureTechniquesFinding the volta: form and meaningIdentifying the speakerAnalysis of languageThemes</p><p>Click to edit Master text styles Second level Third level Fourth level Fifth level</p><p>Features of a Sonnet 14 lines per sonnet - Structure10 syllables per line - RhythmIambic Pentameter RhythmParticular Rhyme Scheme - RhymeParticular Structure - Structure</p><p>Click to edit Master text styles Second level Third level Fourth level Fifth level</p><p>Sonnet Types</p><p>Elizabethan (English / Shakespearean)</p><p>Petrarchan (Italian)</p><p>Click to edit Master text styles Second level Third level Fourth level Fifth level</p><p>Elizabethan SonnetSonnet 18</p><p>Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate: Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, And summer's lease hath all too short a date: Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, And often is his gold complexion dimm'd; And every fair from fair sometime declines, By chance or nature's changing course untrimm'd; But thy eternal summer shall not fade Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest; Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade, When in eternal lines to time thou growest: So long as men can breathe or eyes can see, So long lives this and this gives life to thee. </p><p>TASK: Working as a group attempt to identify any aspect of the sonnet which relates to the areas already mentioned: Structure, Rhyme, Rhythm.</p><p>Click to edit Master text styles Second level Third level Fourth level Fifth level</p><p>Iambic PentameterMETRE - Sound patterns which create rhythmRHYTHM - is measured in small groups of syllables (known as feet)IAMBIC Describes the type of foot that is usedPENTAMETER indicates that a line has five feetIn English an unstressed syllable tends to be followed by a stressed syllableDifferent languages express rhythm in different waysSYLLABLES Unstressed SHORT / Stressed = LONGWhen a pair of syllables is arranged unstressed / stressed, that foot is considered to be IAMBIC</p><p>Click to edit Master text styles Second level Third level Fourth level Fifth level</p><p>ExampleThe word trapeze is made up of two syllables.</p><p>Tra (unstressed/short) &amp; peze (stressed/long)</p><p>Therefore, the stress is on the second syllable</p><p>tra PEZE rather than TRA-peze</p><p>Click to edit Master text styles Second level Third level Fourth level Fifth level</p><p>Iambic PentameterIs made up of FIVE pairs of unstressed / stressed syllables (iambs)ExampleAn iambic foot can be expressed as:Da DUMA standard line of iambic pentameter is five iambic feet in a row:Da DUM da DUM da DUM da DUM da DUM x / x / x / x / x /</p><p>Click to edit Master text styles Second level Third level Fourth level Fifth level</p><p>Variations </p><p> 1 2 3 4 5Now is the winter of our discontent / x x / x / x / x /</p><p>Here the stressed and unstressed syllable have been inverted at the beginning</p><p>Click to edit Master text styles Second level Third level Fourth level Fifth level</p><p>Variations 1 2 3 4 5To be or not to be, that is the question x / x / x / / x x / (x)</p><p>It is also common to add a final unstressed syllable, which in turn creates a weak (feminine) ending</p><p>Click to edit Master text styles Second level Third level Fourth level Fifth level</p><p>Analysis of a SonnetOpening Question Which the rest of the poem will explore and try to answerInterim Question a subsequent question to be addressed.The answer to the opening / interim question A longer illustrationAn observation or philosophical thoughtExplanation / ExpansionMinor Turn (unlike the Italian sonnet the English sonnet does not turn completely at line 9.)The claim / declarationThe couplet usually containing the turn and the conclusion.These are the main aspects of the sonnet to look out for although its worth noting that not all sonnets will have every element.</p><p>Click to edit Master text styles Second level Third level Fourth level Fifth level</p><p>Analysis of a SonnetTask:Working in your group of four, discuss and analyse all three quatrains and the rhyming couplet of Sonnet 18</p><p>Use your textual analysis skills (as well as the techniques you know for analysing language) to attempt to explain what the sonnet is about.</p><p>It may be useful to attempt to write the sonnet out in contemporary English</p><p>Click to edit Master text styles Second level Third level Fourth level Fifth level</p><p>Analysis of a Sonnet</p><p>Compare your group analysis to that of the actual analysis on the printed hand out.</p><p>Were you close?</p></li></ul>