Sonnet 130 by William Shakespeare - 130.pdf · Sonnet 130 by William Shakespeare ... instead of praise…

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<ul><li><p>Sonnet 130 by William Shakespeare Mrs. Keener &amp; Mrs. Smith, </p><p>English 12 Extraordinaires </p><p>January 2016 </p></li><li><p>6:28am </p></li><li><p>If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her </p><p>head. </p></li><li><p>I have seen roses damaskd, red and white, </p></li><li><p>And yet I think </p><p>my love as rare </p></li><li><p>As any she belied </p><p>with false compare. </p></li><li><p>My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun; A Coral is far more red than her lips' red; B </p><p>If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun; A If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head. B </p><p>I have seen roses damask'd, red and white, C But no such roses see I in her cheeks; D </p><p>And in some perfumes is there more delight C Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks. D </p><p>I love to hear her speak, yet well I know E That music hath a far more pleasing sound; F </p><p>I grant I never saw a goddess go; E My mistress, when she walks, treads on the ground: F </p><p> And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare G As any she belied with false compare. G </p><p>Sonnet 130: Shakespearean </p></li><li><p>Figurative Language </p><p>My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun; </p><p>Coral is far more red than her lips' red; </p><p>If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun; </p><p>If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head. </p><p>I have seen roses damask'd, red and white, </p><p>But no such roses see I in her cheeks; </p><p>And in some perfumes is there more delight </p><p>Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks. </p><p>I love to hear her speak, yet well I know </p><p>That music hath a far more pleasing sound; </p><p>I grant I never saw a goddess go; </p><p>My mistress, when she walks, treads on the ground: </p><p>And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare </p><p>As any she belied with false compare. </p><p>Parody: an imitation or exaggeration of a certain style for comedic effect. Shakespeare makes fun of his own poems, for example using the sun </p><p>to point out his mistress flaws instead of praise her (see Sonnet 18). </p><p>Denotation reeks: smell strongly &amp; </p><p>unpleasantly, stinks; be suggestive of something </p><p>unpleasant or undesirable </p><p>Metaphor snow : breasts : -dun </p><p>roses : cheeks Shakespeare uses typical poetic metaphors against themselves, </p><p>pointing out her flaws instead of praising her perfection </p></li><li><p>Tone: Mock-Heroic &amp; Sarcastic My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun; </p><p>Coral is far more red than her lips' red; </p><p>If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun; </p><p>If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head. </p><p>I have seen roses damask'd, red and white, </p><p>But no such roses see I in her cheeks; </p><p>And in some perfumes is there more delight </p><p>Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks. </p><p>I love to hear her speak, yet well I know </p><p>That music hath a far more pleasing sound; </p><p>I grant I never saw a goddess go; </p><p>My mistress, when she walks, treads on the </p><p>ground: </p><p>And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare </p><p>As any she belied with false compare. </p><p>Sarcastic: cutting expression or remark; relentlessly haughty [arrogantly superior]. My mistress eyes </p><p>are nothing like the sun; </p><p> My mistress, when she walks, treads on the ground: </p><p> ...my love [is] as rare / As any she belied with false compare. </p><p>Mock-Heroic: a satire or parody that mocks common, classical stereotypes ...eyes are nothing </p><p>like the sun Coral is far more red </p><p>than her lips red ...in some perfumes </p><p>there is more delight / Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks </p></li></ul>