The Northern Lights The Aurora Borealis. The dancing lights in the cold northern sky has mystified and intrigued mankind for centuries. They have been.

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    24-Dec-2015

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Slide 1 The Northern Lights The Aurora Borealis Slide 2 The dancing lights in the cold northern sky has mystified and intrigued mankind for centuries. They have been seen close to the north pole eerily glowing in green, blue and even in red. Slide 3 They were named in 1621 by Pierre Gassendi after: Aurora, the Roman Goddess of the Dawn, and the Greek word for wind Boreas. Slide 4 During the middle ages, the northern lights were believed to be a sign from God. Slide 5 It wasnt until 1741 when Olof Hiorter and Anders Celsius first described evidence for magnetic influence. Slide 6 The Earth is constantly assaulted by particles expelled by the Sun. However, there are times when the amount of particles are significantly increased. As in times of Solar Storms. Slide 7 Solar Flares fire particles toward Earth at speeds of around one million MPH. Slide 8 When these particles reach Earth, they get caught in the magnetosphere, a teardrop-shaped area of highly charged magnetosphere, a teardrop-shaped area of highly charged electrical and magnetic fields. electrical and magnetic fields. Slide 9 These particles then interact with our atmosphere creating breathtaking streams of color. The color of the lights depend on what particle they interact with And how high above the surface they are. Slide 10 Interaction with oxygen particles will produce green and red, lights. Slide 11 When nitrogen is involved the lights can be seen in blue and violet. Slide 12 Since the Magnetosphere is connected to both the north And southern hemispheres, the particles also interact with The south pole creating the Aurora Australis, the Southern Lights.

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