The bongo book

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Bongo Drum execution and technique

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  • MB96005BCD$17.95

    By trevor salloum

    IG IT A U A U D IO

    * . r - ' fOBlTfii) * i t 1 * u *; M^lf BAY PUBLICATIONS, INC. , ; ,#4.INDUSTRIAL DRIVE

    PACIFIC, MO 63069-0066.

  • mel bay presents

    the bongo bookby tre vo r sa lloum

    CO Contentsm Son Clave, Rumba Clave (Page 8), Cascara, Clave 6/8, Bell (Page 9), HE Bomba, Plena, Merengue, Cumbia, Beguine 1 i t 2 (Page 25) [1:23]

    Martillo (Page 11) [ 1:11 ] \m One-Bar Fills 1-12 (Page 27) [2:09]m Manoteo Variation (Page 13), Martillo: Basic, Variations 1-4 (Page 14) B E One-Bar Fills 13-23 (Page 27) [1:56]

    [1:23] EE One-Bar Fills 1-8 (Page 28) [1:24]m Martillo Variations 1-10 (Page 15) [1:43] HE One-Bar Fills 9-16 (Page 28) [1:22]m Martillo Variations 1-11 (Page 16) [1:58] n u Two-Bar Fills 1-10 (Page 29) [2:04]

    Martillo Variations 1-12 (Page 17) [2:16] HE Fills Derived from Bata Rhythms 1-6 (Page 30) [1:05]E Martillo Variations 1-12 (Page 18) [2:15] HE Fills Derived from Bata Rhythms 1-10 (Page 31) [1:48]m Martillo Variations 1-12 (Page 19) [2:14] HU Fills Derived from Bata Rhythms 1-4 (Page 32) [:47]

    Martillo Variations 13-24 (Page 19) [2:13] HE Bongo Solo (Page 33) [:25]s Bolero, Bolero Variation, Bongo Bell Patterns 1 & 2 (Page 20) [:55] HE Single Stroke Roll, Double Stroke Roll, Triplets (Page 34) [:35]Qo] Jazz Rhythms 1-9 (Page 21) [1:35] HU Flams, Paradiddle, Flam-Triplets, Sixteenth, Paradiddle, Sixteenth NoteHU Rock Rhythms 1-4 (Page 22) [:47] Triplet Combo (Page 35) [1:18]QI] Brazilian: Bossa Nova & Samba (Page 22) [: 19] HE Sixteenth, Gapped Triplet, Eighth Roll, Eighth/Sixteenth Note Triplet:01 Afro, Danzon. Mozambique (Page 23) [:32] Son & Rumba Clave (Page 36) [1:26]03 Songo 1 & 2 (Page 23) [: 19] HE Cascara, Manoteo with Accents: Son Clave, Rumba Clave, CascaraE E Pa ca Clave, Bongos 1 & 2, Conga Adaptation & Variation (Page 24) (Page 37) [1:05]

    [1:05] HE Polyrhythms 1-12 (Page 38) [2:22]

    1997 BY MEL BAY PUBLICATIONS, INC., PACIFIC, MO 63069.ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. INTERNATIONAL COPYRIGHT SECURED. B.M.I. MADE AND PRINTED IN U.S.A.

    Visit us on the Web at http://www.melbay.com E-mail us at email@melbay.com

  • I would like to thank all the people who helped me com pile the information to write this book:

    In particular the great bongoseros: Armando Peraza, Candido Camero, Jack Costanzo and Jose Mangual for permitting me to interview them and share their stories and vast experiences with others.

    M artin Cohen (President of LP M usic Group) for providing the photo o f Jose M angual, phone contacts and general information. Gene Okamoto (Pearl Corporation) for the photo of Armando Peraza and other contacts. Charlie Rooney for information on Jack Costanzo. David Grierson (CBC Radio) for general information.

    John Santos provided insight into the son music style. Tomas E. Cruz (Havana, Cuba) for teaching me the subtleties and beauty o f the bongos.

    Those who assisted in preparing the m anuscript: M ary Bellingham for typing, Ann Raghavan and M elanie Bachm ann for proofreading, Bob Duplessis who helped in editing and Billy M iller for working through the drum patterns.

    My close friend, m usician and naturopathic physician Nathan Ehrlich who is a source of inspiration.

    Drum m ing buddy Lonnie Burma for constant feedback and support.

    Stan Rule for his friendship and legal advice.

    Robin Jarm an for providing his musical writing experience and support throughout the project.

    My deepest gratitude to Nancy Wise who shared her wealth o f knowledge as a publisher in the various stages o f the books development.

    My brother Jayce Salloum (New York) and sister Kelly Salloum (Los Angeles) who located some of the musicians for interviews.

    And above all, to my parents who instilled in their children the immense value of music.

    2

  • The Bongo Book is a guide to the art o f bongo drumming, dem onstrating the wide range o f application that the bongos allow.

    Currently no listing appears in Books in Print devoted solely to bongos. M oreover, few percussion books discuss bongos and those that do devote, at best, only a few pages. Consequently, after discovering this lack of inform ation on the bongos, I became inspired to write this text. It is also disconcerting that the great bongo players (bongoseros) o f the world have not been given the recognition they deserve. Indeed the bongoseros have played a pivotal role in m any musical situations, yet are often misnamed, unspecified, or simply ignored.

    My interest in both writing a book and playing Afro-Cuban music stems not only from the sparse historical information, but also my musical education. In Toronto I studied percussion with Jim Blackley, M emo Acevedo, Bob Becker, and at York University. After playing jazz for several years I becam e interested in the doumbec (m iddle-eastern drum) and Latin percussion.

    Eventually I becam e disenchanted with the life-style o f a professional m usician and decided to return to college to study naturopathic medicine. W hile attending m edical school in Portland, Oregon, I organized jam sessions with other players o f Latin music. Once in practice in Canada I felt a lack of m usical outlets. Thus, I formed a rumba ensemble, teaching others the various com ponents o f the music.

    To further my education I m ade several trips to Cuba to study with some of C ubas finest musicians, including members of Irakere, Roberto Vizcaino (Gonzaldo Rubalcaba), and subsequently Los M unequitos. In addition to teaching privately, I have conducted workshops on Afro-Cuban percussion for schools and colleges in Canada and the United States.

    W riting The Bongo Book became a passion, at times an obsession. The most exciting aspect was the interaction with the great personalities of Jack Costanzo, Arm ando Peraza, Jose Mangual, and Candido Camero. These men are not only great drum mers, but truly wonderful human beings who offered their valuable tim e and recollections.

    I hope that this guide will assist in developing the creative art of bongo drum m ing and enhance enjoym ent for all who play and listen. Further comm ents for future editions are invited.

    Trevor Salloum Kelowna, B.C. 1996

    3

  • ACKNOW LEDGM ENTS

    PR EFA C E...........................2

    3H IST O R Y .................................................................................................................... 5

    ADVANTAGES ...................................................................................................... 5

    D E S C R IP T IO N ........................... 6

    P O S IT IO N .................................................................................................................. 7

    C L A V E ......................................................................................................................... 8

    STROKES ................................................................................................................ 10

    M a n o teo ........................................................................................... 10

    R H Y TH M S............................................................................................. 11

    M a r ti l lo ........................................................................................... 11

    M anoteo V aria tio n ........................................................................ 13

    M artillo V ariations........................................................................... 14

    B olero .............................................. 20

    Bongo B e l l .........................................................................................20

    Traditional/Non-Traditional R h y th m s ........................................20

    F IL L S ............................................................................ 26

    E X E R C ISE S..............................................................................................................34

    Poly rh y th m s.......................................................................................38

    O R N A M E N T A T IO N .................................. 39

    M A IN TEN A N C E.......................................................................... 41

    Head R ep lacem ent...........................................................................41

    A C C E S S O R IE S .......................................................................................................43

    IN T E R V IE W S ......................................................................................................... 44

    Jack C ostanzo.................................................................................... 44

    Armando P eraza ................................................................................48

    Jose M a n g u a l.................................................................................... 51

    Candido C a m e ro ............................................................................. 53

    G L O S SA R Y ..............................................................................................................56

    R E SO U R C E S............................................................................................................59

    BIBLIOGRAPHY .................................................................................................. 61

    IN D E X ....................................................................................................................... 624

  • Bongos, as we know them today, were first used in the Cuban music called the son (pronounced sone). The son evolved around 1900