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    The gradireland Hospitality & Tourism sector career guide is publishedby The Association of Graduate Careers Services in Ireland (AGCSI)and GTI Specialist Publishers Ltd (Ireland).

    Project managed by AGCSI Careers Information Committee:Paul Murphy, Dn Laoghaire Institute of Art, Designand Technology (chair)

    Kendra Cassidy, NUI, Galway (secretary)Colette Aungier, Trinity College DublinCora Cregan, St Patricks College, DrumcondraSeamus McConomy, University of UlsterCatherine Lyster, Letterkenny Institute of TechnologyMary Egan, Athlone Institute of TechnologyGeraldine Fay, Dublin City University

    Editor Abigail LewisDesign & production Maya LittleProofreader Penny KileyPublishers Chris Phillips, Adrian WoodGTI Ireland, 911 Upper Baggot Street, Dublin 4, IrelandT +353 (0)1 660 3422 F +353 (0)1 660 6623

    Printer Headley Brothers, Ashford, Kent, UK

    November 2006 The Association of Graduate Careers Services inIreland (AGCSI) and GTI Specialist Publishers Ltd (Ireland). All rightsreserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced by anymeans including, but not limited to, photocopying or stored in aretrieval system in any form without prior written consent of AGCSI.This is subject to the single exception of photocopying by AGCSI-member institutions. All items so used should be fully acknowledged.The views expressed in articles are those of the author and theirpublication does not necessarily imply that such views are shared byAGCSI and GTI. Whilst every care has been taken in the compilation of this publication, the author and publishers cannot acceptresponsibility for any inaccuracies, or for consequential loss arisingfrom such inaccuracies, or for any other loss, direct or consequential,arising in connection with information in this publication.

    HOSPITALITY & TOURISM

    Opportunities in Ireland and Northern Ireland ..2The main areas of work ..............................................4

    Hotels and other accommodationproviders....................................................................6Food service, pubs and clubs ............................8Tourism and travel ................................................9Events ......................................................................10Leisure and entertainment ............................11

    Training and career development........................12Getting a job ................................................................14Work experience ........................................................16

    CONTENTS

    Writer: JILL BARRETT, Careers Adviser, Dublin Institute of Technology

    TITLES IN THIS SERIES

    Arts & Social SciencesBusiness Studies,Commerce & EconomicsComputing & ITConstructionEngineeringFinanceHospitality & TourismJournalism & Media

    LawLanguagesPostgraduate Study &AwardsPsychologyScienceSocial WorkTeaching & EducationWork Experience

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    Revised for this edition: MARY EGAN, Careers Officer, Athlone Institute of Technology

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    Opportunities in Ireland andNorthern Ireland

    Hospitality and tourism is a growth area, with a surprising number of opportunities for graduates to start a fulfilling career.

    The hospitality and tourism industry is one inwhich the attitudes, competence, enterprise,innovation, hospitality and friendliness of

    people working within it are integral. It is humancapital that drives competitive advantage inhospitality and tourism.

    Facts and figuresThe hospitality and tourism industry continues tothrive: in 2005, the Republic of Ireland welcomedalmost 6.8 million overseas visitors and FilteIreland reported that almost a quarter of a millionpeople were employed in the industry.Approximately 199,000 of these work on a year-round basis and the rest in seasonal employment.

    In the same year, the Northern Ireland touristindustry earned 500 million in revenue, of which

    146 million was earned from domestic holidayspending. Visitor tourism reached 1.967 million. Thiswas good news for the Northern Ireland TouristBoard (NITB), which is currently implementing itsStrategic Framework for Actionplan, 20042007.

    TrendsRepublic of IrelandThe increase in the provision of low-cost air travel

    has resulted in more tourists taking short breaks inIreland, the main benefactors of this trend beingDublin and the larger urban centres. Domestic

    growth in tourism and hospitality has increased by2.5 per cent, with over seven million trips beingtaken within the Republic by Irish residents. Anincrease in disposable income has meant that wenow spend more time and money dining out too.Hotel construction and expansion remains high.In the leisure sector growth remains strong.The objective of the National Sports Strategy,aimed at fostering healthy lifestyles and increasingsports tourism, has provided another developingarea of employment, providing more opportunitiesfor graduates of leisure and event managementprogrammes in particular. The renovation of Lansdowne Road, and the use of Croke Park to hostmajor rugby events while that project is underway,will increase the available capacity for sporting andmusical events.

    There are many challenges facing Irish tourism.A positive one for graduates is the fact that thelabour market is tightening. In 2005 approximately10,000 jobs in tourism remained unfilled, with62 per cent of employers claiming a relatively lowturnover rate. The decrease in the available Irishlabour pool has been replaced by an increase inimmigrant labour. However, as these potentialemployees often hold a different skills set and

    come from a different academic background, thecompetences of graduates of Irish programmes arestill very much in demand.

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    The Tourism Policy Review Group has made

    recommendations for a National Recruitment Plan.This plan is being implemented by Filte Ireland,which established a Tourism Careers PromotionsGroup. One of the Groups aims is to encourageemployers to develop HR practices that foster theideal of work/life balance for all employees.Competition for skilled staff, particularly atmanagement level, is high, meaning thatgraduates are in a better bargaining position thanever when it comes to issues such as pay,conditions, hours of work and so on.

    Threats to the development of tourism andhospitality include exchange rate variance andnational economic factors. These have impactedsignificantly on the price competitiveness of thetourism product. Environmental issues alsothreaten the sustainability of growth.

    Furthermore, the market continues to experiencethe fallout from a number of events includingterrorist attacks in London and the USA, the after-effects of the invasion of Iraq and the consequentreluctance of Americans to travel abroad. However,the smoking ban initially strongly resisted by thesector is now thought to have had a positive effectwithin the industry and many tourists have chosenIreland as a destination specifically because of it.

    Innovative owners of licensed premises havecreated new jobs through provision of foodservices in a move to replace custom lost throughthe ban. The figures for 2006 are looking positivewith overseas visitors for the first quarter up eightper cent on the same period last year.

    Northern IrelandOver 50,000 people are employed in the tourism,

    leisure and hospitality sector in Northern Ireland,and tourism there is looking very good. The NITBreported an overall increase of 13 per cent in earned

    out-of-state revenue for 2005, 354 million in total.

    A further 146 million was earned from domesticspending. Visitor tourism reached 1.967 millionwith visitor nights attracting almost 10 millionpeople. In the leisure sector, what the NITB definesas activity product providers continue to beimportant contributors to the tourism industry.

    The Department for Culture, Media and Sport,like its counterparts in the Republic of Ireland, hassought to implement a strategic plan to developsport and physical activity throughout NorthernIreland. This Strategic Framework for Action isentering its third year. Significant progress hasbeen made in developing its flagship signatureprojects, such as Titanic/Belfast MaritimeHeritageand the Causeway Coast and AntrimGlens. Work is also ongoing on winning themessuch as the production of cultural events andactivity tourism. This has the potential to furtherdeliver international acclaim for Northern Irelandas a tourist destination.

    The department has also committed itself toensuring an adequate skills supply for cultural andheritage attractions. The Strategic Frameworks aimto deliver memorable experienceswill, among otherthings, involve nurturing people through providingopportunities for career development and training.

    The NITB has also recently been discussing the needfor an integrated approach to skills developmentwith key partners including the Department forEmployment and Learning (DEL), the Tourism TrainingTrust (TTT) and the sector skills council, People 1st.All of these developments are encouraging forgraduates. The increasing appeal of Northern Irelandand Belfast as a conference, entertainment andevent venue is evident from a growth in business

    tourism. While Northern Ireland is facing the samechallenges as the Republic in its development of theindustry, the future looks promising.

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    The main areas of workYou can choose from a huge range of employers in this sector.

    Graduates of tourism and hospitalitycourses find work across a vast ra