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  • Resilient Businesses for Resilient Nations and Communities

    1. Resilient businesses for a resilient Asia-Pacific

    1

    [PROVISIONAL COVER PAGE]

    RESILIENT BUSINESSES FOR RESILIENT

    NATIONS AND COMMUNITIES

    UNDERSTANDING THE ROLE AND POTENTIAL OF ASIA-PACIFIC BUSINESSES IN

    DISASTER RISK MANAGEMENT

    DISCLAIMER:

    The contents of this document have not been peer-reviewed. While to the best of the authors’

    knowledge the information and data presented are correct and accurate, those intending to

    reference the information contained herein or make decisions based on this information are

    advised to wait until the peer review process is completed. The authors are fully and solely

    responsible for the contents herein presented.

  • Resilient Businesses for Resilient Nations and Communities

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    2

    “…we cannot envision a resilient society without resilient businesses. To that end, the

    private sector must stand up and be counted as a major component in the post-2015

    disaster risk reduction framework.”

    – Eduardo Batac, Undersecretary of State, Philippines.

  • Resilient Businesses for Resilient Nations and Communities

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  • Resilient Businesses for Resilient Nations and Communities

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    Foreword

    Disaster risk management is increasingly being recognized as a priority area in order to protect

    the hard-earned development gains in Asia Pacific region. However, businesses and the private

    sector have not yet been sufficiently involved in disaster risk management. The private sector is

    estimated to hold 70-85% of the investment globally in most national economies and makes over

    US$80 trillion worth of institutional investments on an annual basis. Clearly, the global community

    can no longer pursue a disaster risk management agenda without involving the active

    participation of the private sector. In turn, the private sector needs to step up to the challenge,

    through multi-stakeholder partnerships, to build its own resilience, to contribute more to the

    resilience of the global economy, and to attain safer nations and societies.

    The present publication is built on an almost two year collaboration by the agencies involved in

    promoting the increased involvement of the private sector in DRR. After a decade of promoting

    public-private partnerships, including those in the ESCAP Business Advisory Council, a partnership

    between UNESCAP, UNISDR and ADPC produced two studies on DRR and the private sector. The

    first study on ‘Engaging Asia-Pacific Businesses in Disaster Risk Management’ (2014) was

    generated following a series of engagements with the private sector to develop the Asia-Pacific

    inputs into the post-2015 framework for disaster risk reduction. The second study (2014) served

    as the basis for a technical session on ‘Public-Private Partnerships’ at the 6th Asian Ministerial

    Conference for Disaster Risk Reduction in Bangkok, Thailand. Subsequently, this latter paper was

    brought to the broader regional platform at the Asia Pacific Business Forum held in Colombo, Sri

    Lanka towards the end of 2014.

    As the world prepares for the post-2015 framework on disaster risk reduction, there is a strategic

    opportunity to establish a clear set of responsibilities and measures of accountability for

    meaningful private sector engagement in disaster risk management. This will also involve the

    broadening of the current paradigm from the responsive conventional Corporate Social

    Responsibility to include disaster risk reduction and ultimately, disaster risk prevention.

    Implementation of the HFA2 in Asia-Pacific will require careful consideration as more than 90% of

    businesses in the region are micro, small or medium enterprises (SME) which tend to be highly

    exposed to risks. Establishing an approach which involves major multinational corporations,

    alongside strengthening SMEs, will be critical for the effective engagement of the private sector in

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    disaster risk management. As such, the provision of an enabling environment with sound legal

    and regulatory frameworks which are actively implemented and enforced, the establishment of

    sound monetary and non-monetary incentive schemes and increased accessibility to risk finance,

    insurance and information will be key. In addition, the promotion of multi-stakeholder

    partnerships among the public and private sectors, nonprofit organizations and academic bodies,

    will need to be further promoted.

    The next challenge will be in translating the post-2015 framework on DRR into actions. As public

    policy makers will need to make informed choices, private sector leaders will also need to

    embark on multi-stakeholder dialogues to integrate disaster risk management into their business

    processes and, more importantly, in their investment decisions thus preventing the exacerbation

    of existing risks and the creation of new risks.

    Involvement of private sector in DRM is still in formative stage and goods practices are yet to be

    systematically accumulated. Notwithstanding, first steps have to be taken to begin documenting

    the evolving thoughts and practices particularly in the Asia Pacific region. Therefore, this

    publication provides an invaluable reference point on the private sector’s crucial role to close such

    gaps and to improve our understanding of the private sector’s involvement in disaster risk

    management. It offers the Asia-Pacific perspective on business and disaster risk management, the

    public sector’s role, and the collaborative arrangements in promoting resilience. It also offers best

    practices, case studies, and examples.

    We believe this study will prove useful in the implementation of future disaster risk reduction

    agendas that seek the full engagement of the private sector. Our organizations, and those other

    dedicated partners with whom we work, look forward to joining you in making a safer and more

    resilient Asia-Pacific region.

    Mr. Shane Wright

    Executive Director

    Asian Disaster Preparedness

    Center

    Shamika Sirimanne

    Director, Information and

    Communications

    Technology and Disaster

    Risk Reduction Division, UN-

    ESCAP

    Ms. Jainey Bavishi

    Executive Director

    R3ADY Asia-Pacific

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    Acknowledgements

    This publication is the result of a joint effort between the Asian Disaster Preparedness Center

    (ADPC) and the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP),

    with financial and technical support from R3ADY Asia-Pacific.

    On ADPC’s side Pedro J. M. Edo led the research and writing team under the supervision of Bill

    Ho, with Kilian Murphy providing outstanding research assistance and inputs. On ESCAP’s side,

    key team members comprised Puji Pujiono, Nia Cherrett, Alf Bilkberg, Sung Eun Kim and Emma

    Johnston under the overall guidance of Shamika Sirimanne, of the Information and

    Communications Technology and Disaster Risk Reduction Division (IDD). Danate Donparadorn of

    ADPC and Mei-Ling Park of ESCAP were responsible for the excellent layout and graphic design

    of the publication.

    Masato Abe of ESCAP’s Trade and Investment Division (TID) provided both supervision and

    substantial technical inputs during the preparation of the two papers which this book is built on.

    In particular, he appreciated Soka University of America for providing valuable research facilities

    to the study. Other important contributions during this phase came from Deanna Morris and

    Teemu Puutio, consultants at TID, ESCAP. Chanidabha Yuktadatta and Aslam Perwaiz (ADPC)

    provided extensive contributions on BCP and SMEs throughout the papers. ESCAP interns Toni

    Reyes, Jeroen Schillings, Timothee Pouzet and Yiqun Li, provided useful research assistance.

    The team is also grateful to Brigitte Leoni and Natalia Tostovrsnik from UNISDR Asia-Pacific

    Regional Office for providing funding and guidance for the two papers, as well as Marc-Olivier

    Roux, also from UNISDR Asia-Pacific Office for his comments on the final phase of the project.

    This publication was made possible through the kind contributions of the following partners: Maki

    Yoshida of the Asian Disaster Reduction Center (ADRC); Takeshi Komino of Church World Service

    (CWS) and the Japan CSO Coalition for 2015 WCDRR (Japan Platform, NGOs & Companies

    Partnership Promotion Network, and The Network of Civil Disaster Re

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