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Message from the Organizing Message from the Organizing Committee Dear participants The organizing committee is pleased to welcome all the participants to “The International Biogeoscience

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Text of Message from the Organizing Message from the Organizing Committee Dear participants The organizing...

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    Message from the Organizing Committee Dear participants The organizing committee is pleased to welcome all the participants to “The International Biogeoscience Conference Nagoya 2013, Japan − Revealing the biotic diversity of the early earth and the evolution of cyanobacteria and eukaryotes”. This conference provides the participants of various disciplines with opportunities to engage in frank exchanges of views about the history of the Earth and life.

    We discuss significant contemporary issues relating to our understanding of the early evolution of life and its interaction with Earth’s surface environments. In the past 10 years, evidence has been accumulating for the early evolution of complex ecosystems and biotic diversity during the Archean. Biosignatures including cellular fossils, carbon isotopic values of kerogen, molecular biomarkers such as lipids and hopanes, and microbialites such as stromatolites and microbially induced sedimentary structures in siliciclastic settings, have been reported from number of sedimentary successions deposited in environments ranging from deep-sea hydrothermal vent systems to coastal sandy intertidal flats, and even from volcanic rocks. It is believed that by 3.0 Ga microorganisms were flourishing in multiple environments. However, these early ecosystems and the biological affinities of reported fossils are poorly understood. Although the signatures of photosynthetic microorganisms can possibly be traced back to 3.49 Ga, the timing of the origin of oxygenic photosynthesis is still unclear. Also problematic are the recently reported spheroidal and lenticular cellular microfossils larger than 20 µm (up to 200 µm) in diameter. They are reported from 3.0, 3.2 and 3.4 Ga sedimentary successions including chemically precipitated cherts and siliciclastic sediments in South Africa and Western Australia. Large size, organic-walled preservation and morphologies imply that they are eukaryotic, although their exact biological affinities and implications for the early evolution of life are poorly understood. In order to answer these unresolved problems, multidisciplinary approaches are indispensable and collaborations of researchers of various disciplines are essential, including further understanding of extant microbes and their interaction with environments.

    Thus, this conference aims to bring together geologists, paleontologists, geochemists, and biologists to discuss contemporary issues relating to the early evolution of life and its interaction with Earth’s surface environments. Hopefully, this conference will provide all participants with opportunities for new discoveries and collaborations.

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    Organizing Committee Chair: Kenichiro SUGITANI, Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University Members: Koichi MIMURA, Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University Makoto TAKEUCHI, Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University Malcolm R. WALTER, Australian Centre for Astrobiology, University of New South Wales Martin J. VAN KRANENDONK, Australian Centre for Astrobiology, University of New South Wales David FLANNERY, Australian Centre for Astrobiology, University of New South Wales Takuya SAITO, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology Mamoru ADACHI, Center for Leading Graduate Schools Program, Nagoya University Co-host organizations Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University School of Informatics and Sciences, Nagoya University Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Nagoya University Nagoya University Museum, Nagoya University Australian Centre for Astrobiology, University of New South Wales Japan Astrobiology Network Association Acknowledgement We deeply appreciate financial support from the Graduate School of Environmental Studies and Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Nagoya University, Kato Memorial Bioscience Foundation, and Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (No. 24654162 for K.S.). Ms. Takako Hirota, of the accounting division of the Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University, Ms. Asa Ito, GT-center, and Mr. Katsuyuki Aoyagi, Japan Travel Bureau are deeply acknowledged for their assistance.

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    General Information Date: November 1st (Friday) — 4th (Monday: National Holiday) Official Language: English. No translation facilities are available in the conference and the field trip, but a voluntary interpreter will accompany in the post-conference optional tour. Venue: Sakata-Hirata Hall, Higashiyama Campus, Nagoya University. 3 minutes walk from exit 2 of the subway station “Nagoya University” (D2 in the campus map below) (the simplest route).

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    Access to Nagoya University: From downtown (Nagoya, Fushimi, Sakae and Shin-Sakae), you take the Subway Higashiyama Line bound for Fujigaoka and transfer at Motoyama St. to the Subway Meijo Line (clockwise). Nagoya University St. is the next stop. You may walk from Motoyama St. to the university. From Chubu International Airport (Centrair) to Nagoya, take the Meitetsu Line (30min. by an expressway).

    To Chubu International Airport (Centrair): Although you may take several ways to the airport (Centrair), we suggest here the simplest way. You take the Subway Higashiyama Line bound for Takabata and transfer at Nagoya St. to the Meitetsu Line. You will find several services of expressway to the Chubu International Airport.

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    Information about Nagoya City: Nagoya Convention & Visitors Bureau  http://www.ncvb.or.jp/en/contents/ Registration Fees: The registration fee includes three free events (a pre-conference one-day field trip to the geological sites and an icebreaker) and refreshments, but NOT lunch or the official dinner. Late and on-site registration Note: Payment only by Japanese Yen (JPY) Professionals: JPY20, 000 Students: JPY7, 000 Accompanying persons: JPY5, 000 One day pass Note: payment only by Japanese Yen (JPY) Professionals: JPY7, 000 Students: JPY3, 000 Accompanying persons: JPY2, 000 Official dinner (on November 2nd at Nagoya University) On-site registration is also available: payment only by Japanese Yen (JPY) All: JPY3, 000 Hands-on Microfossil and Rock Observation: We have a plan of hands-on microfossil and rock observation (all specimens were collected by K. Sugitani). To date this event is planned to be held within the poster room in the afternoon on November 2nd and all the day on November 3rd. K.S. interprets the specimens by request, during e.g. core times for poster session and after the session on November 3rd (approximately 1 hour). Post-conference Optional Tour: A post-conference optional bus tour (from the conference site) will be held in the afternoon of November 4th. We will visit first a museum exhibiting Japanese traditional art during the Tokugawa era and then go to Nagoya Castle. After these activities, we will enjoy Japanese cuisine at a restaurant downtown. The tour fee including dinner is JPY11, 000 (without drinks). If you do not have dinner, the cost is JPY7, 000. Please book this tour from the online registration site  https://amarys-jtb.jp/biogeoscience/ Tokugawa Art Museum  http://www.tokugawa-art-museum.jp/ Nagoya Castle  http://www.nagoyajo.city.nagoya.jp/13_english/index.html

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    Guide to Participants Permission requirement for recording presentations: Please DO NOT take photos of presentations or record talks without permission of the presenters. Please ensure that your mobile phones are turned off during the sessions in the conference room. Oral presentation: 20 minutes including discussions is provided for each general speaker. Please PREVIOUSLY install your PPT files into the computer (Windows) connected to the projector during refreshments and lunches, or in the morning (the reception will open 8:00 on November 2nd and 8:15 on November 3rd and 4th), and check if the presentation works correctly. The presenters may also connect their own computers directly to the projector; for Mac users, please bring your DVI adapter. Poster Presentation: 1) The conference HP says that the poster board is 152cm in height and 115cm in width. However, as the board has very short legs, I recommend that you prepare posters with a printed area less than 120 cm in height. 2) You may post your presentations from 8:00 on November 2nd. Please remove them before 13:00 on November 4th. If posters are left after 13:00 on November 4th, they may be discarded. The poster room is in front of the conference room. You will be able to find it easily. Pins will be available. 3) We have two core times, which are from 15:45 to 16:45 on November 2nd and from 15:25 to 16:25 on November 3rd. Poster presentations will be divided into two groups by their poster numbers (odd or even). Poster presentations with odd numbers will have core time on November 2nd and those with even numbers on November 3rd. Internet access: Internet access is available in and around the conference room. Details will be indicated at the venue. Lunch and refreshment: Lunch will be available at a café near the conference room and some restaurants including Italian, Korean, Chinese, and Japanese around Nagoya University (5 minutes walk), during the conference. Some restaurants in the university are also available on November 2nd. Refreshment will be served in the morning and the afternoon. Help desk: If you have any questions, please feel free to ask the staff at reception. Also please mail to pilbarasu

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