Lesson 1: World Population Trends. Lesson Content Distribution of World Population Trends over Time Trends across regions and countries Population Geography.

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Chapter One

Global DemographicsLesson 1: World Population Trends

1Lesson ContentDistribution of World PopulationTrends over TimeTrends across regions and countriesPopulation Geography (location of the worlds people)Distribution of World PopulationTwo thirds of the worlds inhabitants are clustered in East Asia South Asia South East AsiaWestern Europe.

When Eastern North America is included, these four population concentrations account for of the world population.

Question: Why is most of the worlds population in Asia? (relevant question for slides 3 and 4)

3Distribution and Structure:3/4 of people live on 5% of earth's surface!Total: 6.8 billion on planet as of March 5, 2010Current World Population Counter from U.S Census Bureau As of 2009, the five most populous regions were:

Region% of World PopulationPopulationSouth-Central Asia25.77 %1.78 billionEastern Asia22.64 %1.56 billionSouth-Eastern Asia8.53 %590 millionSouth America5.69 %393 millionNorthern America5.09 %352 million

For the most recent UN data on populous regions, visit: http://www.blatantworld.com/feature/the_world/most_populous_regions.html 4Distribution and Structure:Most Populated CountriesPopulationChina1.3 billionIndia1.2 billionU.S.310 millionIndonesia240 millionBrazil195 millionAs of 2011, the most populated countries are:Why do developing regions make up an increasing share of world population? (Slides 5 and 10) Answer: (Answer: In general, many factors, high birth rates, need for large families for subsistence farming, reliance on children to take care of parents in old age, culture, religion, poverty, fertile land in Asia, etc.)

Source http://geography.about.com/cs/worldpopulation/a/mostpopulous.htm

5World Population Density

While Africa is considered part of the developing world why is the population density relatively low? (Slide 6) (Possible answers: high infant mortality, disease, harsh living conditions, war, poverty, etc.). See Article Density, Distance, and Division in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Link for list of countries by population density: http://www.worldatlas.com/aatlas/populations/ctypopls.htm - ask students to guess what is the densest country in the world: Monaco because of the small size of the country6Trends Over Time: World Population Growth, in Billions

Number of years to add each billion (year)All of Human History(1800)130 (1930)30 (1960)15 (1975)12 (1987)12 (1999)12 (2011)14 (2027)21 (2048)Sources: First and second billion: Population Reference Bureau. Third through ninth billion: United Nations, World Population Prospects: The 2004 Revision (medium scenario), 2005 and UN7It has been taking fewer number of years to add an additional billion to the worlds population. Question to ask the students why does it increasingly take less years to reach the next billion , but then slightly more years to reach the 9th billion?

According to the UN, in 2100, the world is expected to reach 10 billion.

Why will the worlds population level off at about 11 million? What factors contribute to the projected population changes? (Slides 7, 8, and 9) Potential answers: public health (epidemics, AIDs, etc), environmental factors (climate change, pollution, etc.), urbanization, economic development, food availability, etc

A.D.2000A.D.1000A.D.11000B.C.2000B.C.3000B.C.4000B.C.5000B.C.6000B.C.7000B.C.1+ million years87652143OldStoneAgeNew Stone AgeBronzeAgeIronAgeMiddleAgesModernAgeBlack DeathThe Plague9101112A.D.3000A.D.4000A.D.5000180019001950197520002100FutureNumber of people in BillionsSource: Population Reference Bureau; and United Nations, World Population Projections to 2100 (1998).Trends Over Time: World Population Growth Through History8Source: Population Reference Bureau, 2005 World Population Data Sheet.Trends Over Time: Projected Population Change, by CountryPercent Population Change, 2005-2050

9Women worldwide are having fewer children in their lifetimes, from an average of five children born per woman in the 1950s to below three in 2000. All of the most recent projections put forth by the UN assume that levels of childbearing will continue to decline in the next century.Trends Over Time: Population Shift

Notice the population shift to the third world

Why do developing regions make up an increasing share of world population? (Slides 5 and 10) Answer: (Answer: In general, many factors, high birth rates, need for large families for subsistence farming, reliance on children to take care of parents in old age, culture, religion, poverty, fertile land in Asia, etc.) 10Trends Over Time: Population Growth WorldwidePopulation Increase and Growth Rate, Five-Year Periods

MillionsPercent increase per yearSource: United Nations, World Population Prospects: The 2004 Revision (medium scenario), 2005.11This figure illustrates the lag between changes in the rate of growth and the net increase in population per year.Over the period 1985-1995, the population growth rate declined (a reflection of declining fertility), yet millions of people were added to the worlds population (which peaked around 1985, when 87 million people were added each year). From 2000 on, the growth rate will continue to decline. Between 2015 and 2020, we will still be adding 72 million people each year. Why? Because the generation of women now having their children is very large as the result of high fertility in their mothers and grandmothers generations.Graying Planet

Compare and contrast global aging challenges facing developed vs. developing countries. (See Global Aging Crisis reading)12Greying Planet

The End

An Aging World: The United StatesClass Discussion: Why Does this Matter to ME?What are the implications of an aging population for:The U.S. housing market?Social security and pension funds?Public financing of colleges and universities?Global migration flows?

Chart121141412121530130160

Sheet1Ninth21Eighth14Seventh14Sixth12Fifth12Fourth15Third30Second130First Billion160

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