How would you punctuate this?  Woman without her man is nothing

  • Published on
    16-Dec-2015

  • View
    212

  • Download
    0

Embed Size (px)

Transcript

<ul><li> Slide 1 </li> <li> How would you punctuate this? Woman without her man is nothing </li> <li> Slide 2 </li> <li> Woman, without her man, is nothing. Woman! Without her, man is nothing. Punctuation makes a difference! </li> <li> Slide 3 </li> <li> Commas Where the comma lies makes a difference! </li> <li> Slide 4 </li> <li> Where the comma L IES makes a difference L is for lists Use commas to separate three or more words, phrases, or clauses in a series. Examples: Ellen bought new jeans, a plaid skirt, and a pair of gloves. They drove to the post office, parked the car, and unloaded the boxes. </li> <li> Slide 5 </li> <li> Where the comma L IES makes a difference L is for lists Use commas to separate three or more words, phrases or clauses in a series. Examples: Ellen bought new jeans, a plaid skirt, and a pair of gloves. They drove to the post office, parked the car, and unloaded the boxes. Update: the last comma before the and in a series of three of more may be left out. Ellen bought new jeans, a plaid skirt and a pair of gloves. </li> <li> Slide 6 </li> <li> Where the comma L IES makes a difference L is for lists Use commas to separate three or more words, phrases or clauses in a series. Examples: Ellen bought new jeans, a plaid skirt, and a pair of gloves. They drove to the post office, parked the car, and unloaded the boxes. GRAMMAR TEXT p. 481, ex. 8 (#2,3,4,6,7,9) </li> <li> Slide 7 </li> <li> Where the comma L IES makes a difference L is for lists Use commas to separate three or more words, phrases or clauses in a series. Use commas to separate equal adjectives, but not those that must stay in a specific order. Example: It was a narrow, rough road that lead to the many new houses. </li> <li> Slide 8 </li> <li> Where the comma L IES makes a difference L is for lists Use commas to separate equal adjectives, but not those that must stay in a specific order. Example: It was a narrow, rough road that lead to the many new houses. TEST: If you can reverse the order of the adjectives without changing the meaning, then a comma should be placed between them. </li> <li> Slide 9 </li> <li> Where the comma L IES makes a difference L is for lists Use commas to separate equal adjectives, but not those that must stay in a specific order. Example: It was a narrow, rough road that lead to the many new houses. TEST: If you can reverse the order of the adjectives without changing the meaning, then a comma should be placed between them. GRAMMAR BOOK p 482, Ex. 9 (#1-4) </li> <li> Slide 10 </li> <li> Where the comma L IES makes a difference I is for introduction Use a comma after an introductory word, phrase, or clause. It is introductory if it precedes the subject of the sentence </li> <li> Slide 11 </li> <li> Where the comma L IES makes a difference I is for introduction Examples: No, you should not marry a Montague. Juliet, will you marry me? Of course, I will marry you. Obviously, we might get in trouble. At Friar Laurences cell, we will meet. Because he thought it might end the feud, Friar Lawrence agreed to marry Romeo and Juliet. </li> <li> Slide 12 </li> <li> Where the comma L IES makes a difference I is for introduction Use a comma after an introductory word, phrase, or clause. Current updates: You must use a comma if it is an introductory clause. In other words, you must use a comma if the introductory part has a verb. Introductory clauses starting with a subordinating conjunction always need a comma. Otherwise, you dont have to have a comma if the introductory part is five (5) words or less and omitting the comma does not cause confusion. </li> <li> Slide 13 </li> <li> Where the comma L IES makes a difference I is for introduction Grammar Text p. 484, ex 10 (all) </li> <li> Slide 14 </li> <li> Where the comma L IES makes a difference E is for extras Extra words are words that are not needed to retain the meaning of the sentence. Surround these words with commas. These appear in pairs unless it is at the end of the sentence and then the period replaces the second comma. </li> <li> Slide 15 </li> <li> Where the comma L IES makes a difference E is for extras Examples: Parenthetical (interrupters): I am talking to you, Juliet, about our plan. We decided, of course, to keep this a secret. Appositives (rename) Benvolio, Romeos friend, did not know of the plan. Non-essentials (3-D information) It was in Verona, not Mantua, where the wedding takes place. Juliet, who was 13 years old, married Romeo. </li> <li> Slide 16 </li> <li> Where the comma L IES makes a difference S is for side by side sentences Two sentences joined by a coordinating conjunction (FANBOYS) must have a comma before the conjunction. </li> <li> Slide 17 </li> <li> Where the comma L IES makes a difference S is for side by side sentences [ Independent clause], [coordinating conjunction] [independent clause]. [Sentence], [FANBOYS] [sentence]. Examples: Romeo was a gentleman, and Juliet was a lady. He was impulsive, but she was level-headed. They were young, yet they married. They were young yet married. (See the difference?) </li> <li> Slide 18 </li> <li> Where the comma L IES makes a difference ! But wait, there are more comma rules! </li> <li> Slide 19 </li> <li> Where the comma L IES makes a difference ! But wait, there are more comma rules! Use commas Use in large numbers I saw 3,999 birds. to separate parts of a geographical name, Ex. I lived at 4801 Benton Street, Iowa City, Iowa. to separate parts of a date where needed, Ex. On Friday, October 21, we will celebrate your birthday. to surround titles of people and some business abbreviations, Ex. Harold H. Wood, Jr., is my brothers name. Ex. Baloney, Inc., was going out of business. after the salutation in a personal letter, Ex. Dear John, after the closing in any letter, Ex. Sincerely, Mrs. Bacon to set off a direct quotations, Ex. I want to ask you, inquired the teenager, if I could stay up and watch the world series game tonight. Use in a elliptical sentence Joe plays the guitar; his brother Fred, the flute. </li> <li> Slide 20 </li> <li> Two Uses of a Semicolon ; 1.Put a semi-colon between independent clauses to form a compound sentence It may be independent clauses joined by the semi-colon instead of a comma and coordinating conjunction (FAN BOYS). Example: Romeo reached the Friars cell first, and he went inside and anxiously waited for Juliet. OR Romeo reached the Friars cell first; he went inside and anxiously waited for Juliet. It may be independent clauses joined by a semi-colon followed by a conjunctive adverb or transitional phrase and comma. Example: Romeo was thrilled about his marriage; however, he is now exiled from Verona. Romeo killed Tybalt; as a result, he is banished from Verona. </li> <li> Slide 21 </li> <li> 2. For sentences with too many commas, use a semi-colon to avoid confusion. Use a semi-colon to separate words or phrases in a series if they contain commas. Examples: Dinner at the Capulets party included rainbow, brook, and lake trout; large mouth, small mouth, and white bass; and a few northern pike. Romeo, a Montague, told Tybalt, Juliets cousin, that he did not hate him; but Tybalt, the fiery Capulet, called Romeo a villain. Two Uses of a Semicolon ; </li> </ul>

Recommended

View more >