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UNIVERSITYy

PENNSYLVANIA UBKARIES

^^fHnfeHMT ^VVT^pf

\

/HIS

MEMORIAL VOLUME

IS

PUB-

I

LISHED TO

CELEBRATE THE

209TH ANNIVERSARY OF THELANDING OF THE FIRST GER-

MAN SETTLERS

IN

AMERICA.6,

THURSDAY, OCTOBER

1892.

OFFICERS OF THE -GERMAN SOCIETY,,;,1892.President,

Pi,;

RUDOLPH BLANKENBURG.Vice-Presidents,

FRANZ EHRLICH,Secretary of the

F.

OLDACH.

Board

of Directors,

HENRY AUER.Secretary,

Dr. JOS.

BERNT.

Treasurer,

FR. LESER.Solicitor,

H. D.

WIREMAN.Dii-ectors,

FR,J. C.

BRAUN.

HUNGERBUEHLER,MEYNEN,

Dr. TH. H. E. V. KALCK,E.

GRUEL, M. HOTZ,F. C.J. F.

THEO. LEUPOLD,FR.

LUEDECKE,C.

REINHOLD P. LEDIG, MENDE,RAU.

GEO.

NEWMAN,HEXAMER.

Chairman of Committee on Library,

DR.Chairman

C. J.

of Committee on Medicine,

DR. A. FRICKE.Chairman of Committee onSchools,

GENERAL LOUIS WAGNER.Chairmanof Committee on Archives,

DR.Chairman

O.

SEIDENSTICKER.

of Committee on Immigration,

GODFR. KEEBLER.Chairmanof

Souse Committee,

C. F.

RUMPP.(2)

COMMITTEE ON CELEBRATION

GERMANDK. CHAS.J.

DAY."

HEXAMER,

Chairman.

HUGO THORSCH,

Secretary.

H. LIERZ,

DR.O.

JOSEPH BERNT,

PROF. DR.

SEIDENSTICKER,

V.

KALCK,

HENRYC.

D.

WIREMAN,

JOSEPH MORWITZ,E.

A.

HARTMANN,

W. SIEGMAN,

HENRY AUER,A.

GENERAL LOUIS WAGNER,F,

LEONHARDT,TEUBNER,

LESER,

ED.

C. T.

EBEN.

(3)

(3erman 2)^^

(^.elebtation^

Ipart

1.

OVERTURE" Tannhaeuser,"

R.

Wagner

GRAND

Grand Orchestra. S. L. Herrmann, Director. MALE CHORUS and ORCHESTRA" YoungH. ZoellnerBythe combined Siugers of the

Siegfried,"

Maennerchor, Junger Maennerchor, Harmonie, Quartett-Club and Philad'a Turners. C. A. Hartmann, Director.

ORATION(Ex U.

INS.

GERMANByCol. F.

Raine of Baltimore."

Consul in Berlin and Publisher of the

Deutsche Correspondent.").

MIXED CHORUS " Meeresstille undBy

Glckliche Fahrt,"

.Beethoven

the combined Male and Female Choruses of the

Junger Maennerchor and Harmonie.

Carl Samans, Director.Weber

IPart 2.1.

OVERTURE " Jubel,"Orchestra.

Carl Samans, Director.. ..

2.

MALE CHORUS a.b.

" Ich hub ein kleines Lied erdacht," " Lullaby,"

Bukgert Brahms

Maennerchor. S.3.

L.

Herrmann, Director.BeethovenJ.

MALE CHORUS" Die

Vesper,"

Quartett-Club.4.

C. A. Hartmann, Director.Fache

MALE CHORUS" Waldeinsamkeit,"Janger Maennerchor.

Carl Samans, Director.C.

5.

MALE CHORUS a.ORATIONIN

"The Forest," "Wie die wilde Ros' im Wuld," Harmonie. "W. Kuenzel, Director.6.

IsemannC.

Maier

6.

ENGLISHBy the Hon.Charles

Emory Smith.

(Ex U.7.

S.

Minister to Russia and Editor of" The Press.")

GRAND MALE CHORUS"

and

ORCHESTRAFr.

Hail Columbia," By

Lachner

the combined Singers of the

Maennerchor, Junger Maennerchor, Harmonie, Quartett-Club and Philad'a Turners. C. A. Hartmann, Director.

.

8.

MARCH " La Reine

de Saba,"

..

Gounod

Orchestra.

S.

L.

Herrmann, Director.(4)

1. Ijcil.1.

^aunpttfer^DutJcrturcrri)c)lcr

SOBagner. i^crrmann,.. ,

on 40 JHann. >'^'^)^ ^rejj") an^ ^iya>gr. Sac^ner

7.

e^or mit Oriftcfier eil olumBia"Cnrner-CBefanfehtton. (. 51. ;^rtmnnn,jDirigent.

iHnnerd)or, Junger iHtnnerdjor, (fiiunrtett-CUib, iprmonie unJ)

8.

SRorf^ Knigin Don aba"rd)e|ler.

ounobj0errmnnn, Birigent.(5)

5-, if.

INTRODUCTORY REMARKS.preparing the present volume, the main object has been to furnish an array of various and, it is to be hoped, acceptable information on the History of the German element in the United States. The verybrief statements crowded into the form of a chronological table, ofcourse, do not tell the

Tn

whole story, they merely remind of events worth

recording, and should they arrest the attention of readers, so as to lead

them to further inquiry, they will have served a very good purpose. The 400th anniversary of the landing of Columbus, which America is about to celebrate, conjures up before our minds, visions and musings of unusual interest. The veil which has shrouded the Western hemisphere from the ken of the Eastern half of the globe is dropped, and in course of time the sea-faring and powerful nations of Europe take possession of a new world. The track of Columbus is followed by Latin, that of Sebastian Cabot by Teutonic races. Plow would the world look now had the frail bark of the Genoese navigator been wafted to the northern coast ? How much depended at the critical moment on the current of air or the flight of birds coming from an unseen land ? A southern breeze might have given North America to Spaniards and what then ? A fertile theme for surmises and dreams;

Fromkind.

a wilderness of speculation Ave seek refuge in the conviction,

that the course events have taken was ordained for the best of

man-

Withnewera.

the discovery and seizure of America, history enters

upon a

Human

culture not only finds

new

fields to

spread over, but

assumes new aspects and develops into forms of wonderful grandeur

and promise.

An

energetic, restless,

broad-minded race occupies the northern

portion of the continent, which becomes the seat of a republican empire

the like of which the world has never seen before

;

an empire, stupen-

dous in expanse, blessed by bounteous Nature with every advantage she can bestow, pledged to secure to all its inhabitants freedom, justice

and unrestricted pursuit of happiness a vast empire, Avith countless resources, controlled by one nation and its indomitable will. Here the overflow of Germany's population has for two hundred years found;

congenial quarters.

Among

a people of kindred descent and similar(6)

type, speaking a language which, historically,

is

a

German

dialect, in

a

country that affords unequalled opportunities for the fulfillment of the aims of life, the Germans feel more at home than in any other regionoutside their

own fatherland. In the various pursuits of life, they haveas a

in

friendly emulation with native inhabitants secured successtion,

when merited

reward of industry,

skill,

and distinchonesty and steady

habits.

Appreciating the honor and recognizing the duties of citizen-

ship, they

have in peace and war been loyal to their adopted country, and contributed to its progress and welfare. In colonial times the defense of the frontier against hostile Indiansfell,

in Pennsylvania, largely

to the rural population of German nativity or extraction.

The Revolution

found the Germans eager partisans for independence and active combatants partly in batallions of their own, partly in the ranks of otherregiments.

In the Mexican war, Germans fought shoulder to shouldercrisis

with Americans, and when the great

of the Civil war arrived, the

German-Americans did more thanof the Union.

their share in battling for the life

spirit of its institutions,

Loyalty to their adopted country and joyous acceptance of the do not imply indifference to their old father-

land nor suppression of national characteristics and time-honoredcustoms.

Nor can

the entrance of so

many

millions of

Germans

into

the body politic of the United States be looked upon as a mere procees

of absorption

and assimilation

to

existingleft

conditions.

Whereveris

present in sufficient numbers, they have

an impress which

noticed

approvingly, and they hope also hereafter to exert a salutary influence

throbbing with

They are not a passive niass, but an element The United States is not exclusively of English make or mould. The nation now forming will derive its distinctive features from more than one source, to fulfill its grand destiny. Looking back to the long line of years during which Germany has contributed to America's growth and progress, the present generation of Germans in the United States follow only a natural and proper impulse in solemnly honoring the day which marks the beginning of German immigration, the 6th of October, 1683, when the first column of Germans, under the auspices and at the invitation of "William Penn, arrived at Philadelphia. It was the charm of liberty, vouchsafed by the benign founder of Pennsylvania, that induced them to seek refugeon their environment.vitality.

in a " wilderness,"

and

it is still

liberty, in all its blessed manifestations,

that draws

them

to this land of promise.

O. S.

GERMAN-AMERICAN EVENTS, PRINCIPALLY OFPENNSYLVAN