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Final Technical Requisites

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A document summarizing the technology work as part of my March Thesis at the Welsh School of Architecture

Text of Final Technical Requisites

  • 1 PRO

    JECT

    PRO

    POSA

    L Technical Requisites CHRISTIAN BROOKLAND MARCH2

  • 2CONT

    ENTS

    CONTENTS

    4-17 THESIS

    18-23 STRUCTURE

    24-29 TECTONICS

    30-37 CONSTRUCTION

    38-45 ENVIRONMENT/SERVICES

    46-48 LIGHTING

    49 FIRE/ACCESS

    50 http://digitaltectonics.org/blog/

  • 3CONT

    ENTS

  • 4THES

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    4

    Oxford boasts the oldest University of Great Britain, which has given the city its famous reputation based around the college system and its accompanying history of academia.A further, less celebrated aspect of Oxford is the research some of the departments are involved in, such as animal testing. The con-troversy and uncertainty revolving around the laboratories is the reverse side to the story, the dark face of Oxford.

    This state of imbalance between the colleges and the labs I have dif-ferentiated between as Extroverted VS Introverted.

    INTROVERSION VS EXTROVERSION - Gradience and Transparency through Architecture

    ANALSIS OF OXFORD

    In order to gain an understanding of the varying gradation ranging from Oxfords tourist image (displayed) and its more exclusive or hid-den destinations (inward looking), I conduced the analysis depicted in the map on the right hand side.According to several paramaters such as entrance fee or seasonalopening patterns to institutions and colleges alike I evaluated the varying levels of accessibility throughout the city centre and the sci-ence campus.

  • MOSTEXTROVERT/ACCESSIBLE

    MOSTINTROVERT/INACCESSIBLE

    SITE

    Parameters:

    _EntranceFee_Prioritisation_BlueBadgeGuide_OpeningTimes_GroupRestrictions

    1

    2 4

    3

    1_ChristChurch2_RadcliffeCamera3_AshmoleanMuseum4_PittRiversMuseum

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  • 6THES

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    ACCESS

    The site is adjacent to Oxfords high street and is linked to several important walking routes passing through the variouscollege gardens. The site mainly attracts pedestrian activity, as parking inOxford is very limited. However a Park&Ride service bringsyou close to the Botanic Gardens.

    WALKING PATH

    HIGH STREET

  • MOSTPUBLIC/ACCESSIBLE

    MOSTPRIVATE/INACCESSIBLE

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    GRADATION OF ACCESSIBILITY

    To support the architectural strategyin relation to the existing buildings and gardens situated on the site, the varyinglevels of accessibility were studied. This took into account the high courtyard wall, the varying levels, the potential for movement and routes etc.

  • 8THES

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    8

    INTEGRATED COMPONENTS

  • 9THES

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    EXISTING CAMPUS

    Department of Plant Sciences:28 academic staff

    60 postdoctoral researchers40 technicians and admin staff

    Department of Zoology:70 academic staff

    100 postdoctoral researchers

    INSTITUTIONAL SETUP

    In the context of its longstanding traditionOxford University has a unique college system,whereby several colleges feed into peerfaculties and departments.The diagram below explains their interrelationship.

    Provision: - Teaching space for 50 postgraduate students - Lecture theatre - Professors accomodation

    -public spaces / cafe etc-main research spaces / laboratories-new greenhouses/test spaces for botany

  • 10

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    TECTONCS/MODELLING

    Whilst experimenting with model mak-ing and materials for the Primer, I de-veloped a theme of transparency and layers of exposure early on. This has eventually translated through into my tectonic strategy in the use of mem-brane and structure.

  • 11

    THES

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    BIOMES

    The idea of offering more than just new greenhouses, but to create artificial environments which house species of a particu-lar region by mimicing the natural conditions of the climate they are associated with.

    This establishes entire environments within which the academics can perform hands on, state of the art research on botany, and the public can be directly involved in the different atmospheres and qualitites of several biomes, encouraging their education through interaction with the biomes characteristics, rather than being presented with an exclusive exhibit.

    Their location within the site as well as the form are derived from further analysis in terms of suitability for climatic op-portunities.

    BIOSPHERE 2 // ARIZONA

    EDEN PROJECT // CORNWALL

  • 12

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    HIERARCHY IN BIOMES CRITERIA

    The following study determines what environmental criteria applies most for each region. This can then be directly translated into design decisions.

    HUMI

    DITY

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    HEAT

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    TROPICAL

    MEDITERRANEAN

    DESERT

    BANANATREEMEDINILASTERN ANTHURIUMBUSH BIRDOFPARADISE HELICONIA BROMELIAD ANANAS SPICEPLANTS COMMONFERNS COFFEEBEANTREE SOFTTOUCHBROM.ANTHURIUMBROM.ALOCASIAPLANT

    ALOELIMETREE LEMONTREE CALIFORNIAPOPPY PROTEA COMMONPOPPY

    JADECACTUSSTRAWBERRYCACTUSWELWITSCHIAMIRABILIS HOODIAGORDONII BARRELCACTEI FINGERCAC. SAGUAROCAC. STARCAC. BOTTLETREE ARGUNPALM

    MED.HERBS LUPINS OLIVETREES CITRUSTREE CHAPARALL PROTEA VINESBORAGEHERBPLANTALOE

    HOT/COLD

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    TROPICAL

    MEDITERRANEAN

    DESERT

    BANANATREEMEDINILASTERN ANTHURIUMBUSH BIRDOFPARADISE HELICONIA BROMELIAD ANANAS SPICEPLANTS COMMONFERNS COFFEEBEANTREE SOFTTOUCHBROM.ANTHURIUMBROM.ALOCASIAPLANT

    ALOELIMETREE LEMONTREE CALIFORNIAPOPPY PROTEA COMMONPOPPY

    JADECACTUSSTRAWBERRYCACTUSWELWITSCHIAMIRABILIS HOODIAGORDONII BARRELCACTEI FINGERCAC. SAGUAROCAC. STARCAC. BOTTLETREE ARGUNPALM

    MED.HERBS LUPINS OLIVETREES CITRUSTREE CHAPARALL PROTEA VINESBORAGEHERBPLANTALOE

    DRY15

    THES

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    PLANT GROWTH CRITERIA

  • 16

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    SUN PATH AND SHADOW ANALSIS using ecotect

    This established appropriate locations for each biome within the site, for example the tropical biome being most exposed and linking with the river to make the most of humidity - whereas the desert biome relates more closely to the stony courtyard wall.

  • 17

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  • [Academic use only]

    18

    STRU

    CTUR

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    STEEL FRAME

    STRUCTURALLY INSULATED PANELS(SIP)

    STRUCTURAL GRID

  • [Academic use only]

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    STRU

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  • [Academic use only]

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    FOUNDATION STRATEGY // Steel Frame

    Fixed Base columns:

    Each column is fixed securely to the ground with little to no movement at base level. The frames junctions however, (where the ETFE cushions meet the structure) allow for some cantilever in the frame, providing scope for some movement and bending under wind loads.

    Base detail

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    FOUNDATION STRATEGY // SIPs units

    The panels rest on 300mm trench stripfoundations. In all situations there are no more than one story loads being carried,allowing for smaller foundations

  • [Academic use only]

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    STRU

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    STRUCTURE

    Looking at the tropical biome in detail, as its relative height and slenderness calls for a structural response concerning lateral and vertical wind loads.

    bracing detail

  • 23

    STRU

    CTUR

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    acts like a hangar structure

    weight of cantilver is distributed to an an-chor in the ground via tension rods

    cantilever

  • 24

    TECT

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    TECTONIC SITUATION ON SITE

    The gardens are flanked by a large stone wall listed as grade 1. This demands a senstive approach to the existing situation, both in design and tectonic approach.

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    TECT

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  • 26

    TECT

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    TECTONIC AMBITION / APPROACH

    In reaction to the existing stone wall and classical buildings, it was decided to mirror the existing build-ings roughly in scale so as not to try and overpower them, but to complement their mutual views and profiles. Many of the chosen precedents express a clarity in structure and succesfully portray a deep layering of structure, foliage, screens etc. In the light of this something similar seemed to be appropriate, however also adding something slight-ly more contemporary in technology and aesthetic quality.

    Combining ETFE and steel would allow for a lot of flexibility and freedom in sizing and design, but more importantly, given the nature of the ETFE be-ing comparable to an inflated lung, it manages to convey a sense of the living organism which doesnt become stagnant but is contiuously in operation. This needed to be combined with user interaction and at-mospheric response.

    ETFE is used as the main cladding material instead of glass - some of the characteristics opposite speak in favour of this chosen tectonic approach.

  • 27

    TECT

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    ETFE DATA

    U - Value of 1.95

    -little need for maintenance

    -very low water vapour permeability

    -high light translucency - up tp 90 percent

    -extreme resistance to weathering

    -very high resistance to tearing

    -linear elastic be

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