of 1 /1
282 say more of Sir William himself ?-and would the precise meaning of the last nine words be perceived by any but a medical reader? The newspaper editor is fully justified in saying, as he does, 11 this, in itself, is a very high recommenda- tion" ! More, however, remains behind; and the paragraph quotes other testimonials also, from gentlemen who would probably be equally surprised with Sir William Jenner to see their opinions adduced in corroboration of his. It is painful to add that the whole manifesto is given to the world in order to secure to Mr. Z- the post of parish doctor, at a stipend of .815 per annum ! Truly Mr. Z is worthy of better things; or else the testimonial system ds greater humbug than even we ourselves had thought it. THE RESULT OF SANITARY IMPROVEMENTS IN ST. LUKE’S, MIDDLESEX. THE Vestry of St. Luke’s, Middlesex, have at length re- ,solved to put in force the 35th section of the Sanitary Act of 1866. They have been induced to adopt it on account of the great diminution of sickness which has resulted from the general enforcement of sanitary improvements. In the year 1865, the year before the Aet was passed, there were 1766 cases of fever in the parish; during 1866 there were .572. The Act being now put in force, the numbers were reduced to 207 in 1867 ; to 179 in 1868 ; to 174 in 1869 ; and to 100 in 1870. Every case of fever sent to the hospital ’, had cost the district 2 ; and, besides this, the families had in many cases to be supported for several weeks out of the poor-rates, whilst every now and then the death of a male parent left a widow and a young family in a state of desti- tution requiring relief for many years. The Vestry are now convinced of the economy of putting legislation into effect, and the resolution to adopt the 35th section was carried by a majority of 39 to 7. ST. THOMAS’S HOSPITAL. WE learn that Mr. Wagstaffe has retired from the candi- - dature for the assistant-surgeoncy, and will be unopposed -for the subordinate appointment of resident assistant- surgeon. Mr. Arnott, of the Middlesex Hospital ; Mr. Barwell, of the Charing-cross Hospital; Mr. MacCormac, of Belfast ; and Mr. West, of Birmingham, remain in the field for the former appointment. The two first-named gentlemen have only recently come forward, and can hardly expect to succeed on the present occasion, as Messrs. ’, West and MacCormac have already been actively engaged ’, in canvassing for several weeks, and each gentleman has no doubt secured numerous friends among the Governors. Mr. Barwell might have stood well in the contest if he had been earlier in the field; but we think he would now increase his popularity by withdrawing. By such a course he would avoid creating a division in the staff of St. ’Thomas’s; who, unless united, may see Mr. West, who is a man from their own school, defeated by a comparative atranger, with smaller claims to such promotion. EDINBURGH INFIRMARY. ON Monday the Managers met to consider a communica- tion from the Senatus of the University containing replies to several questions discussed at a late conference between the two bodies as to the sale of the Infirmary. The Senatus (it set forth) were advised that the transaction between the Managers and the University, with regard to the sale, was in every way valid. They had no intention of taking part in the litigation commenced by Mr. Maclaren, 21.P., against I the Infirmary Managers, but were disposed for the present to leave the affair in the hands of the latter, convinced that these gentlemen would be able to devise some arrangement, satisfactory, not only to both the interested parties, but to the public generally. At the same meeting the Managers agreed to postpone consideration of the subject of the medical education of women. THE CONTAGIOUS DISEASES INTEREST AT GLASGOW. Pas est et ab 7toste daceri is a maxim which we should like to see obeyed by the profession in its warfare against the 11 Contagious Diseases Interest." How is it that the energy and self-devotion are all on the side of that mischievous propaganda P eve should like to see a counter-demon- stration in support of the sound sanitary view, for every such meeting as that announced from Glasgow, where Mrs. Butler, of Liverpool, called upon a gentleman to read her prepared address, which was followed by the moving and carrying of resolutions demanding the repeal of the Acts. At least, if we are to oppose the " Contagious Diseases Interest," let us adopt some better tactics than those of the Glasgow students, whose interruptions to the reading of Mrs. Butler’s paper were such that the ringleaders had to be expelled by the police. It is a pity to see a good cause prejudiced by youths whose only apology is that they are "young and curly"; while the bad cause rather gains than suffers from the conduct of the working men, who, in showincr n themselves especially hostile to the Acts," do not fail to observe the proprieties. THE VENTILATION OF THE SEWERS IN LIVERPOOL. WE regret to observe that the Town Council of Liverpool have resolved to continue and extend the present imperfect mode of ventilating the sewers. In the absence of man- holes and flushin- apparatus, it is impossible to prevent the formation of deposits, and, without adequate openings on the surface, the foul gases must inevitably escape into the dwelling-houses through imperfect service drains. If the authorities are afraid of such openings as are found at very frequent intervals in every London thoroughfare, they may adopt the protection of charcoal ventilators, like those in use at Croydon. We never yet heard of any harm coming from openings in the centre of the roadway; and if the stench should in any case be disagreeable, attention ought at once to be directed to the foul condition of the sewer underneath. We hope, therefore, that the Liverpool autho- rities, if not convinced, will wait until the question has been examined and reported on by Drs. Parkes and Sanderson. THE DISTRESS IN FRANCE. IT is probable that by this time there are many people who entertain grave doubts as to whether the course pursued by this country, as a neutral power, in spending an enormous sum with the view of directly relieving the sick and wounded soldiers, was a very wise one. The effect of relieving the contending armies of their wounded was, logically speaking, to free the combatants from a great and embarrassing responsibility, and enable them to prosecute their military plans with greater energy. It may sound parodoxical to declare that to succour the wounded men of both sides was not a humane act, but we fear that such a declaration is nevertheless true. Quite otherwise, however, is it with the efforts that have been, and are still being, made to ward off the famine and pestilence that were threatening France. The Mansion House fund has already reached upwards of .8100,000. The peasants and a great part of the civilian population of France, on whom this war has fallen with so cruel a stroke, are worthy of every as-

EDINBURGH INFIRMARY

  • Upload
    ngothuy

  • View
    216

  • Download
    0

Embed Size (px)

Text of EDINBURGH INFIRMARY

Page 1: EDINBURGH INFIRMARY

282

say more of Sir William himself ?-and would the precisemeaning of the last nine words be perceived by any but amedical reader? The newspaper editor is fully justified insaying, as he does, 11 this, in itself, is a very high recommenda-tion" ! More, however, remains behind; and the paragraphquotes other testimonials also, from gentlemen who wouldprobably be equally surprised with Sir William Jenner tosee their opinions adduced in corroboration of his. It is

painful to add that the whole manifesto is given to theworld in order to secure to Mr. Z- the post of parishdoctor, at a stipend of .815 per annum ! Truly Mr. Zis worthy of better things; or else the testimonial systemds greater humbug than even we ourselves had thought it.

THE RESULT OF SANITARY IMPROVEMENTSIN ST. LUKE’S, MIDDLESEX.

THE Vestry of St. Luke’s, Middlesex, have at length re-,solved to put in force the 35th section of the Sanitary Actof 1866. They have been induced to adopt it on account ofthe great diminution of sickness which has resulted fromthe general enforcement of sanitary improvements. In the

year 1865, the year before the Aet was passed, there were1766 cases of fever in the parish; during 1866 there were.572. The Act being now put in force, the numbers werereduced to 207 in 1867 ; to 179 in 1868 ; to 174 in 1869 ; andto 100 in 1870. Every case of fever sent to the hospital ’,had cost the district 2 ; and, besides this, the families hadin many cases to be supported for several weeks out of thepoor-rates, whilst every now and then the death of a maleparent left a widow and a young family in a state of desti-tution requiring relief for many years. The Vestry are nowconvinced of the economy of putting legislation into effect,and the resolution to adopt the 35th section was carried bya majority of 39 to 7.

ST. THOMAS’S HOSPITAL.

WE learn that Mr. Wagstaffe has retired from the candi-- dature for the assistant-surgeoncy, and will be unopposed-for the subordinate appointment of resident assistant-

surgeon. Mr. Arnott, of the Middlesex Hospital ; Mr.

Barwell, of the Charing-cross Hospital; Mr. MacCormac,of Belfast ; and Mr. West, of Birmingham, remain in thefield for the former appointment. The two first-named

gentlemen have only recently come forward, and can

hardly expect to succeed on the present occasion, as Messrs. ’,West and MacCormac have already been actively engaged ’,in canvassing for several weeks, and each gentleman hasno doubt secured numerous friends among the Governors.Mr. Barwell might have stood well in the contest if he hadbeen earlier in the field; but we think he would nowincrease his popularity by withdrawing. By such a coursehe would avoid creating a division in the staff of St.

’Thomas’s; who, unless united, may see Mr. West, who is aman from their own school, defeated by a comparativeatranger, with smaller claims to such promotion.

EDINBURGH INFIRMARY.

ON Monday the Managers met to consider a communica-tion from the Senatus of the University containing repliesto several questions discussed at a late conference betweenthe two bodies as to the sale of the Infirmary. The Senatus

(it set forth) were advised that the transaction between theManagers and the University, with regard to the sale, wasin every way valid. They had no intention of taking partin the litigation commenced by Mr. Maclaren, 21.P., against Ithe Infirmary Managers, but were disposed for the presentto leave the affair in the hands of the latter, convinced thatthese gentlemen would be able to devise some arrangement,

satisfactory, not only to both the interested parties, but tothe public generally.At the same meeting the Managers agreed to postpone

consideration of the subject of the medical education ofwomen.

THE CONTAGIOUS DISEASES INTERESTAT GLASGOW.

Pas est et ab 7toste daceri is a maxim which we should liketo see obeyed by the profession in its warfare against the11 Contagious Diseases Interest." How is it that the energyand self-devotion are all on the side of that mischievous

propaganda P eve should like to see a counter-demon-stration in support of the sound sanitary view, for everysuch meeting as that announced from Glasgow, where Mrs.Butler, of Liverpool, called upon a gentleman to read herprepared address, which was followed by the moving andcarrying of resolutions demanding the repeal of the Acts.At least, if we are to oppose the " Contagious DiseasesInterest," let us adopt some better tactics than those of theGlasgow students, whose interruptions to the reading ofMrs. Butler’s paper were such that the ringleaders had tobe expelled by the police. It is a pity to see a good causeprejudiced by youths whose only apology is that they are"young and curly"; while the bad cause rather gains thansuffers from the conduct of the working men, who, inshowincr n themselves especially hostile to the Acts," donot fail to observe the proprieties.

THE VENTILATION OF THE SEWERS INLIVERPOOL.

WE regret to observe that the Town Council of Liverpoolhave resolved to continue and extend the present imperfectmode of ventilating the sewers. In the absence of man-

holes and flushin- apparatus, it is impossible to prevent theformation of deposits, and, without adequate openings onthe surface, the foul gases must inevitably escape into thedwelling-houses through imperfect service drains. If theauthorities are afraid of such openings as are found at veryfrequent intervals in every London thoroughfare, they mayadopt the protection of charcoal ventilators, like those inuse at Croydon. We never yet heard of any harm comingfrom openings in the centre of the roadway; and if thestench should in any case be disagreeable, attention oughtat once to be directed to the foul condition of the sewerunderneath. We hope, therefore, that the Liverpool autho-rities, if not convinced, will wait until the question hasbeen examined and reported on by Drs. Parkes andSanderson.

____

THE DISTRESS IN FRANCE.

IT is probable that by this time there are many peoplewho entertain grave doubts as to whether the course

pursued by this country, as a neutral power, in spendingan enormous sum with the view of directly relievingthe sick and wounded soldiers, was a very wise one.

The effect of relieving the contending armies of theirwounded was, logically speaking, to free the combatantsfrom a great and embarrassing responsibility, and enablethem to prosecute their military plans with greater energy.It may sound parodoxical to declare that to succour thewounded men of both sides was not a humane act, butwe fear that such a declaration is nevertheless true. Quiteotherwise, however, is it with the efforts that have been, andare still being, made to ward off the famine and pestilencethat were threatening France. The Mansion House fund hasalready reached upwards of .8100,000. The peasants and agreat part of the civilian population of France, on whom thiswar has fallen with so cruel a stroke, are worthy of every as-