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DPAC Clovis 2003

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DPAC studio project in Clovis, NM.

Text of DPAC Clovis 2003

  • Clovis DowntownRevitalization

    Clovis, New Mexico

    Design and Planning Assistance CenterUniversity of New Mexico

    Spring 2003

  • Clovis Downtown Revitalization

    Clovis, New Mexico

    Design and Planning Assistance CenterUniversity of New Mexico

    Spring 2003

    Faculty Advisor:Mark Childs

    Student Team:

    Smitha BalasubrahmanyaR. Jarrod Cline

    Katya CrawfordR. Sean Darnell

    Kim DeschampheleireKatie Maguire

    Steve MillerDarren Pocus

    Bill SlettomKrystyna Zelenay

  • Design and Planning Assistance Center

    (DPAC) is a community service of the School of Architec-ture and Planning at the University of New Mexico. Wework with community groups and not-for-profit organizationsthroughout New Mexico on architectural, planning, andlandscape projects. DPAC was established in 1969 and isstaffed by students in architecture, planning, and landscapedegree programs.

  • Design ProjectsInfinity NightclubDarren Pocus

    Facade Design IllustrationsSmitha Balasubrahmanya

    Overhang DesignKrystyna Zelenay

    Adaptive SpacesR. Jarrod Cline

    The 300 LoftsR. Sean Darnell

    Streetscape/Pocket ParkKatya Crawford

    The Clovis RailyardKim Deschampeleire

    Clovis Farmers MarketKatie Maguire

    Landmark LoftsSteve Miller

    Architecture and SignageBill Slettom

  • Infinity Nightclub

    Located at the south end of MainStreet, Infinity Nightclub can become an an-chor to both the the Main Street and RailYard corridores. Infinity will occupy theBekins warehouse building. The design willcreate two distinct spaces. The first willopen up to Main Street and will be a lounge/restaurant space. The second will be a highenergy dance area. The two spaces willbe defined by a ramp, which will be en-closed by a mesh screen and a glass wall.The ramp will wind in and out of the build-ing, establishing a visual landmark andcreating a dynamic and energetic circula-tion space.

    FacultyMark Childs

    StudentDaren R Pocus

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  • Facade Design Illustrations

    The facade design illustrations provideguidelines for the facades of the buildings on mainstreet. The designs recognise the depth of 10-14within the facade in all floors to be a critical volume.Elements like balconies, signage, show windows,skylights, staircases and double height spaces inthis volume make the facade dynamic. The side-walk in front of the stores and street furniture playan important role in integrating the design andcreating a unified composition.

    FacultyMark Childs

    Student Smitha Balasubrahmanya

    Scheme one shows an internalspiral stairs, a mural wallcontinuing up all the floors, whichalong with the trellis, providesshade in the terrace and a curvedbalcony. The trellis work, balconyand the supports for the signageare proposed to be in wrought ironto subtely compliment the olderbrick facade.

    Illustation of use of shades to enhance the facade

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  • 5Scheme two shows the building with thespiral stairs to the terrace external to the facade. Ithas a glass enclosure and is part of the balcony.

    The signage is proposed to be of metal-metal frame with metal lettering- anchored to thefacade. The intention here is to highlight the brickfacade through the signage.

    Both the designs suggest paving- colouredconcrete tiles set within the main concrete paversof the sidewalk- flowing into the stores show areaand thereby integrating the store and the sidewalk.Separate paving in front of the entrance door to thesecond floor lend an identity to the activities andfloor above.

    The designs also consider the stores to begeneric. An idea that the store front could have acounter for exhibit/sale/display/activity with seat-ing as a form of advertisement along with the showwindows is demonstrated here.

    Illustration of the use of shades to enhance the facade

    Initial studies of spaces withinthe facade show existingvariatons in the first floor showwindow area and intersectingpossibilities to enhance therelation of the building with thesidewalk.

  • OVERHANGDESIGN byKrystyna Zelenay

    view of front elevation

    Elevation 1=16 View of overhang from above

    Plan

    Site Plan

  • Sketch of building with overhang

    South Elevation

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  • the 300 lofts

    A THRIVING DOWNTOWN DEPENDS ONTHE PRESENCE OF PEOPLE. THE BEST WAY TOGET PEOPLE DOWNTOWN IN MY OPINION IS TOHAVE THEM ALREADY THERE.... LIVING. I THINKTHAT DOWNTOWN RESIDENCE IS AN INTEGRALPART OF REVITALIZATION. THIS PROPOSAL ENVI-SIONS THE DEVELOPEMENT OF A SIXTEEN TOTWENTY-TWO UNIT CONDOMINIUM COMMUNITYON THE SECOND STORY OF THE 300 BLOCK. THEMAIN FOCUS OF THIS PROPOSAL IS LOOKING ATTHE BLOCK AS ONE PLOT TO DEVELOP AS AWHOLE RATHER THAN DEVELOPING IT IN APIECE-MEAL FASHION. BY INCLUDING ALL THELOTS IN ONE DESIGN RESOURCES ARE ABLE TOBE POOLED AND A COMMUNITY CAN BE CRE-ATED.

    THE 300 LOFTS IS DREAMT OF AS AGROUP OF APARTMENTS. THAT ARE GROUPEDAROUND COMMON ATRUIM ENTRANCES. BYGROUPING THE UNITS AROUND ATRIUMS THE USEOF CORRIDORS CAN BE AVOIDED. CREATINGSPACES IN WHICH TO SOCIALIZE RATHER THANPATHS.

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    R. Sean Darnell

  • THE UNITS ARE FINISHED OFF WITH DOORS, WINDOWS AND BENCHES OF A COMMON LAN-GUAGE, CREATING A STRONGER SENSE OF COMMUNITY. MATERIAL CHOICES FOR THESE VISIBLEFIXTURES SHOULD LOOK AT MATERIALS THAT JUXTAPOSE THEMSELVES AGAINST THE VERNACU-LAR BRICK AND WOOD, WHILE INCORPORATING FEATURES COMMON IN THE EXISTING ARCHITEC-TURE OF THE AREA. MY SUGGESTION IS BRUSHED METAL FOR THE DOORS AND WINDOWS ANDSTARK MODERNISM FOR THE ATRIUM FURNISHINGS IN AN EFFORT TO SEPARATE THE COMMUNITYFURNISHINGS FROM THOSE OF THE OCCUPANTS.

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  • TO CREATE A COMMUNITY LIKE THE 300 LOFTS ADEVELOPEMENT CORPORATION WOULD HAVE TO PURCHASE EITHERTHE ENTIRE 300 BLOCK, OR THE SECOND FLOORS WOULD HAVE TOBE OPTIONED IN A CONDOMINIUM TYPE ARRANGEMENT. A PLAN FORHOUSING IN THE DOWNTOWN AREA NEEDS TO THINK BIG TO SUC-CEED. INDIVIDUAL HOUSING ABOVE THE EXISTING STREET LEVEL RE-TAIL, THOUGH UNIQUE, DOES NOT CREATE THE LARGER SCALE COM-MUNITY THAT MAINSTEET IS WORKING TOWARDS, NOR DOES IT AD-DRESS THE LARGER GOAL OF BRINGING BODIES TO THE DOWNTOWNAREA. THE PROPOSAL OF THE 300 LOFTS LOOKS AT THE DOWN-TOWN AREA AS A GROUP OF BLOCKS RATHER THAN AS A GATHER-ING OF INDIVIDUAL LOTS. WHEN APPROACHING THE AREA IN THISMANNER, THE CONCEPT OF COMMUNITY BECOMES POSSIBLE.

    unit type-B

    unit type-A

    site plan

    kitchen

    dining area

    living

    bath

    bed

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  • III. Design

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    CLOVIS MAIN STREET

    Currently Main Street is one hundred feet wide from buildingedge to building edge. Ten foot sidewalks, angled parking, andthree car lanes compose the street. As a pedestrian, the streetfeels wide and exposed with few places to sit, gather or social-ize comfortably. Although many of the building have strongarchitectural character, the street as a whole does not.

    The Intention of this design is to accomplish the following:

    Give Main Street an identity that celebrates the historyand character of Clovis.

    Bring the festive energy of the Farmers Market into thestreet on the 200 block.

    Enhance the pedestrian experience.

    Turn the existing pocket park into an urban oasis.

    Incorporate rain catchment systems that provide waterfor the trees and pocket park on the 200 block.

    COW SCULPTURES ON MAINSTREET?

    The economy and identity of Clovis havestrong roots in the dairy industry. Theonce abundant aquifer has played a vi-tal role in helping this economy thrive.The cows are not only sculptural ele-ments, but cisterns as well. The intentof this installation is to honor and cel-ebrate both of these vital forces thatsupport the community. The cows be-come a proud symbol of Clovis thatstrengthens the identity of Main Streetwhile simultaneously adding a playfulelement to the downtown.

    STREETSCAPE(with a focus on the 200 block)POCKET PARK

    Student:Katya Crawford

    Cast out of copper, the cows collect rainwater frombuilding tops through a siphoning system that canlater be used to water trees along Main Street.

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    THE FARMERS MARKET

    This design proposes that the Farmers Market take pace on the 200 block of Main Street.By closing off the street to through traffic during market hours, Main Street would be transformend into abustling pedestrian environment. Vendors would back their vehicles up to the sidewalk to display their goodsunder the canopies of large shade trees. Market goers would have the opportunity to rest, socialize or picnicin the pocket park in between shopping. Local acoustic bands could play music in the park to add to the festiveenergy, and local businesses (such as a cafe or the candy store) could set up temporary stalls at the market.

    THE STREET

    The turning lane has been re-moved and the sidewalks ex-tended out to eighteen feet each.This additional space allows re-tail or cafe business to spill outinto the street, creating a moreengaging outdoor environment.This also allows room foradditonal tree plantings, benchesand pedestrian scale lighting.

    A successful downtown is when the actual street becomes the destination. The Farmers Market is theperfect opportunity to make that happen.

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    THE POCKET PARK

    The idea behind the design of the pocketpark is to create an intimate urban oasis.The east wall has been relaced with a fa-cade that recognized the dominant archi-tectural style of the two-story brick build-ings along Main Street. Eastern sunlightwill filter through the open windows on thesecond level and three doors on the bot-tom level of the facade allow pedestrianaccess to and from the park

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