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Abstracts from Ninth Annual ~ee[i~g, ~ash~~gto~, DC I87 Lewis, R., Kelland, 0. ‘I., P Kupke, T, Lafayette Clinic and Hampton VA tledical Center A normative study of the Repeatable Cognitive-Perceptual-notor Battery The Repeatable Cognitive-Perceptual-Xotor-Battery (RCPhl was designed to be sensitive to arousal level and attention capacity, thereby reflecting reversible changes in brain physiology. Such changes would generally be produced by either clinical or experimental manipulations of pharmacological or physical agents. In order to be repeatable, the battery is brief and constructed to be insensitive to practice effects; alternative .forms and pre-baseline orientation trials are used. In fact, numerous studies have demonstrated the sensitivity of the RCPM to both the therapeutic and iatrogenic effects of prescription drugs, oxygen therapy, alcohol use, etc. Vhile its research utility has been demonstrated, a lack of normative data has precluded its general use as a brief clinical assessment of brain dysfunction. The current study establishes norms for the battery for ages 18-80 in a sample (R=2061 representative of the general adult population in terms of pro-rated IQ and education. Study findings describe age-related changes on component tests of the battery and the effects of education and estimated IQ on test performances. KcCaffrey, R. J., Comish, P., Krahula, M. M. %e University at Albany, StateUniversity of New York, AlbanyMedical College and Conifer Park Traumaticbrain injury as a factorintherelapsedymmics inagroup ofpolysuMzmce abusers. Thepresen t stucfy investigated Whether or not a history of one or mretramticbrain injurieswasa factor intherelapsedymmics in a population of inpatient substaw abuserswhowereur&rgohj,at least, theirsecond rehabilitation prcgram cxnnpared to a population of individuals underyoiq theirfirsttxe&ment for subs- abuse. All participants underwentadetailed clinical interviewwhich contaimd a section focusing on ahistmyof traumaticbrain injury. In addition, bothqroupswere evaluated neuro~~olqically, in ordertodeterminewfietherornotreci~vismper sewas associated with cxqnitive ii7pairm3-L 'Ihe results of the studyindicated no differences onthe dmcqraphicvariables betweenthetwogro~. Surprisingly, the groupsalso did not differsiqnificantly on any of the mu,rqx3ycholcgicalinstruments. l.Bepatients inthe relapse prcgrant did report a significantly higherincidence of traumatic brain injuries relative to thosepatients utx3ex~oirq their initial t?x?at2mnt. Interestingly, thepatientsinthe relapseprcgramwere also mre likely to be the offspring of an almholic father ccqared to those patients in their initial. treatmant. ?he potential contribution of traumatic brain injuries and familial patterns of alcoholism will be discussed.

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Abstracts from Ninth Annual ~ee[i~g, ~ash~~gto~, DC I87

Lewis, R., Kelland, 0. ‘I., P Kupke, T, Lafayette Clinic and Hampton VA tledical Center A normative study of the Repeatable Cognitive-Perceptual-notor Battery

The Repeatable Cognitive-Perceptual-Xotor-Battery (RCPhl was designed to be sensitive to arousal level and attention capacity, thereby reflecting reversible changes in brain physiology. Such changes would generally be produced by either clinical or experimental manipulations of pharmacological or physical agents. In order to be repeatable, the battery is brief and constructed to be insensitive to practice effects; alternative .forms and pre-baseline orientation trials are used. In fact, numerous studies have demonstrated the sensitivity of the RCPM to both the therapeutic and iatrogenic effects of prescription drugs, oxygen therapy, alcohol use, etc. Vhile its research utility has been demonstrated, a lack of normative data has precluded its general use as a brief clinical assessment of brain dysfunction. The current study establishes norms for the battery for ages 18-80 in a sample (R=2061 representative of the general adult population in terms of pro-rated IQ and education. Study findings describe age-related changes on component tests of the battery and the effects of education and estimated IQ on test performances.

KcCaffrey, R. J., Comish, P., Krahula, M. M. %e University at Albany, State University of New York, Albany Medical College and Conifer Park Traumaticbrain injury as a factorintherelapsedymmics inagroup ofpolysuMzmce abusers.

Thepresen t stucfy investigated Whether or not a history of one or mretramticbrain injurieswasa factor intherelapsedymmics in a population of inpatient substaw abuserswhowereur&rgohj,at least, their second rehabilitation prcgram cxnnpared to a population of individuals underyoiq their first txe&ment for subs- abuse. All participants underwentadetailed clinical interviewwhich contaimd a section focusing on ahistmyof traumaticbrain injury. In addition, bothqroupswere evaluated neuro~~olqically, in ordertodeterminewfietherornotreci~vismper sewas associated with cxqnitive ii7pairm3-L 'Ihe results of the study indicated no differences onthe dmcqraphicvariables betweenthetwogro~. Surprisingly, the groups also did not differ siqnificantly on any of the mu,rqx3ycholcgicalinstruments. l.Bepatients inthe relapse prcgrant did report a significantly higher incidence of traumatic brain injuries relative to those patients utx3ex~oirq their initial t?x?at2mnt. Interestingly, thepatients inthe relapseprcgramwere also mre likely to be the offspring of an almholic father ccqared to those patients in their initial. treatmant. ?he potential contribution of traumatic brain injuries and familial patterns of alcoholism will be discussed.