10/28/20151serpil tuti - Bullying in School (victims)

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  • **serpil tuti - Bullying in School (victims)

    serpil tuti - Bullying in School (victims)

  • serpil tutiDevelopmental Psychology Bilkent University , Pre-PhD

    serpil tuti - Bullying in School (victims)

  • The more serious forms of bullying can have very serious consequences.For the children being bullied, their lives are often made miserable for a considerable period of time.**

    serpil tuti - Bullying in School (victims)

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  • Health Consequences of Being Bullied

    Students may develop problems with anger management or self-destructive behavior.

    Students may have unexplained physical ailments, such as headaches and stomach aches.*

    serpil tuti - Bullying in School (victims)

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    Chart1

    166

    4223

    179

    4916

    4916

    235

    209

    2810

    Bullied

    Not Bullied

    Health Consequences of Bullying (Fekkes et al., 2003)

    Sheet1

    BulliedNot Bullied

    headache166

    sleep problems4223

    abdominal pain179

    moderate indication4916

    strong indication4916

    feeling unhappy235

    feeling tense209

    anxiety2810

    To resize chart data range, drag lower right corner of range.

    Bullied Not bulliedHeadache16%6%Sleep problems42%23%Abdominal pain17%9%Feeling tense20%9%Anxiety28%10%Feeling unhappy23%5%Depression scalemoderate indication49%16%strong indication49% 16%

    Sheet2

    Sheet3

  • Children who are bullied often experience low self-esteem and depression even into adulthood **

    serpil tuti - Bullying in School (victims)

  • Children who are bullied perceive school as an unsafe place and are likely to miss more days of school than their peers, and as a result, their education is negatively affected.**

    serpil tuti - Bullying in School (victims)

  • Low achievement in schoolLeaving school earlyLegal or criminal troublesAcademic underperformanceAbuse of wife and children**

    serpil tuti - Bullying in School (victims)

  • Violence towards own childrenFemale bullies become mothers of bulliesPsychological problems, including stress, lasting into adulthoodAggression**

    serpil tuti - Bullying in School (victims)

  • ets browse the research...Students who are bullied consider school to be an unsafe, unhappy place.7% of Americas 8th graders stay home at least once a month because of bullies.Students who are bullied are more isolated because their peers do not want to lose status by associating with them.**

    serpil tuti - Bullying in School (victims)

  • Longitudinal Study of Children Who are Bullied (Olweus, 1993)60% of boys who were bullies in middle school had at least one criminal conviction by age 24. 40% had three or more convictions. Bullies were 4 times as likely as peers to have multiple convictions.

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    serpil tuti - Bullying in School (victims)

  • hat can teachers do? - 1Make sure that your students understand that you take bullying very seriously and that bullying is not allowed in your classroom or at the school. Students should know that you expect that they: Should not bully others; Should be helpful and kind to students who are bullied; Should report bullying that they experience or witness to you or other adults at school.

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    serpil tuti - Bullying in School (victims)

  • Take immediate action if you observe or suspect bullying.

    If possible, set aside some time during each school week to talk with your students about bullying and peer relations.

    Learn as much as you can about bullying among children and youth and best practices for addressing bullying.

    hat can teachers do? - 2**

    serpil tuti - Bullying in School (victims)

  • Integrate bullying prevention themes across the curriculum.

    Think creatively of ways that you can weave bullying themes into language arts, social studies, or even math lessons!

    hat can teachers do? - 3**

    serpil tuti - Bullying in School (victims)

  • Closely supervise your students and be watchful for possible signs of bullying among students in your class(es).

    Remember that children often are reluctant to report bullying to teachers, and some bullying can be subtle and difficult to detect. hat can teachers do? - 4**

    serpil tuti - Bullying in School (victims)

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    serpil tuti - Bullying in School (victims)

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    serpil tuti - Bullying in School (victims)

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    serpil tuti - Bullying in School (victims)

  • hat can parents do?First, focus on your child. Be supportive and gatherinformation about the bullying.

    Contact your childs teacher or principal.

    Help your child become more resilient to bullying.

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    serpil tuti - Bullying in School (victims)

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  • Why did K.B. tell her mother that her day at school was "just great"? A) She didn't want her mom to worry about her. B) It was a great day, because she was excited to see Mr. Bittner. C) She probably thought her mom would get mad if she said she had a bad day. C

    I doubt it. Her mom probably would be upset and concerned. She definitely wouldn't be mad at K.B.B

    I don't think so...but seeing Mr. Bittner may have been the one good thing in her day! A

    I agree. **

  • What might be a better way for K.B. to answer her mom's question about her day? A) Tell her mom she doesn't want to talk about it. B) Lie and tell her mom that she made new friends so her mom isn't worried about her. C) Tell her mom what really happened on her first day. A

    That probably won't make K.B. feel any better. Her mom also won't know what to think. Are there any other good answers? B

    Hmmm. I don't think that's going to help K.B. any. Plus, her mom probably will find out that it isn't true.

    CI think this is the best answer. K.B. probably will feel better just talking about her horrible day. Her mom seems really caring and may have some good ideas about how to help K.B. at the new school.**

  • If you were K.B., what would have been the worst part of your day? A) When Cassandra dissed her in front of the science class. B) When Cassandra and her friends wouldn't make room for her at the lunch table. C) When Cassandra pulled the ketchup joke on K.B. and everyone laughed at her. D) When she found the "teachers pet" sign on her locker. E) It's hard to say...It was all pretty horrible. AThat was pretty bad-especially since the whole class laughed at her. BThat must have been really hard on K.B. Has this ever happened to you or anyone you know? CShe looked really embarrassed, didn't she? DYeah. Especially since this was at the end of a long day of being bullied. E I agree! **

  • Did Melanie bully K.B.? A) Yes. B) No. A Although she wasn't as mean as Cassandra, Bibi, or Mimi, she did join in some of the bullying. For example, she helped to make sure that K.B. didn't sit with them at the lunch table, and she laughed at K.B. when she found the "teachers pet" sign on the locker. On the other handshe did look kind of upset when K.B. sat on the ketchup packet. What could Melanie have done to make sure she helped and didn't hurt K.B.? B Hmmm. I don't think I agree. Although she did look kind of upset about K.B. sitting on the ketchup packets, Melanie did join in some of the bullying. For example, she helped to make sure that K.B. didn't sit with them at the lunch table, and she laughed at K.B. when she found the "teachers pet" sign on the locker. What could Melanie have done to make sure she helped and didn't hurt K.B.? **

  • Why do you think Melanie didn't laugh when K.B. sat on the ketchup packets in the lunch room? A) Maybe she didn't see it happen. B) She thought she'd get in trouble. C) She thought Cassandra and the other girls had gone too far in picking on K.B. A Take a look again. She saw it happen, alright B Maybe...but I think there's a better answer.

    C I think you're right. So what should she do about it?

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  • ReferencesCraig, W. M. (1998). The relationship among bullying, victimization, depression, anxiety, and aggression in elementary school children. Personality & Individual Differences, 24, 123-130.Rigby, K. & Slee, P. T. (1993). Bullying among Australian school children: Reported behavior and attitudes toward victims. Journal of Social Psychology, 131, 615-627.Fekkes, M., Pijpers, F. I. M., & Verloove-VanHorick, S. P. (2004). Bullying behavior and associations with psychosomatic complaints and depression in victims. Journal of Pediatrics, 144, 17-22.www.stopbullying.com

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  • T hank you for being a participant **serpil tuti - Bullying in School (victims)

    serpil tuti - Bullying in School (victims)

    ****What effects does bullying have on its victims? Bullying may seriously affect the psychosocial functioning, academic work, and the health of children who are targeted. Bully victimization has been found to be related to lower self-esteem, higher rates of depression, loneliness, and anxiety (e.g., Craig, 1998; Nansel et al., 2001; Rigby, & Slee, 1993).

    Victims are more likely to report wanting to avoid attending school and have higher school absenteeism rates (Rigby, 1996). Researchers also have identified that victims of bullying were more likely to report more suicidal ideation than their non-bullied peers. (Rigby, 1996).

    Sample Citations:

    Craig, W. M. (1998). The relationship among bullying, victimization, depression, anxiety, and aggression in elementary school children. Personality & Indi