14
SIMPSON QUICK ASSEMBLE HOARDING COLLAPSE A recent incident on one of our sites involved a section of quick assemble hoarding falling due to unforeseen wind loadings inside the building, which destabilised the hoarding. The incident highlights the need to risk assess the suitability of using quick assemble hoardings within internal work areas and the need to introduce controls such as additional weighting down, bracing and ties where internal wind loadings might apply. Thankfully no one was injured in this incident however the hoarding fell into an area where third parties were present and the potential consequences are therefore very clear . ..-...2 •• , l Tie o ff or return brace end sections I l Deployment of Qukk Assemble hoardings. Always assemble as per the manufacturers instructions within a barrier demarcated and supervised work area that segregates third parties (staff, members of the public) at safe exclusion distances from the work. Ensure the hoarding is installed as per the agreed position marked on the construction issue phasing drawing and that the hoarding does not obstruct emergency fire escape routes. If the hoarding system is to extend into the ceiling space above, the asbestos survey register must be checked to ensure the ceiling spaces are free of asbestos containing material and are safe to enter. If the hoarding is to be installed _around live electrics or fire alarm systems, consultations must be made with a competent engineer and the management representatives onsite who are responsible for the building services. Ensure footing plates are set on level and firm surfaces and all panel sections are secured by the correct manufacturer supplied fittings and not retro fit clamps or ties . Ensure materials are not stored in close proximity to, or up against the hoarding and do not impose any loading on the hoarding. A recorded inspection of all quick assemble hoardings should be completed daily using the temporary works plan (HSF059) hoarding inspection form. Assess Internal Wind loadings and introduce additional measures Internal wind loadings can apply where hoardings are deployed near entrance lobbi es, external doors in regular use, service areas and building plant air handling and extraction. Site Management should risk assess and identify where wind loads and sudden gusts might arise imposing loads onto the hoarding. Based on the risk assessment findings, introduce measures to safe guard against internal wind loadings: weight down footings, ensure end sections are tied off to a secure supporting structure or are braced with return angle bracing. Installing lobbi es into the work areas and incorporating lobbies into the hoardings will also assist with structural supporting of the hoarding and reducing wind load influence. '/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////; - . . ·11-,·. Autho.rised by: Phil Mason II II Tool Box Talk Procedural Review H&S Notice Board Supply Chain

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Page 1: • II • II •

SIMPSON

QUICK ASSEMBLE HOARDING COLLAPSE A recent incident on one of our sites involved a section of quick assemble hoarding falling due to unforeseen wind loadings inside the building, which destabilised the hoarding. The incident highlights the need to risk

assess the suitability of using quick assemble hoardings within internal work areas and the need to introduce controls such as additional weighting down, bracing and ties where internal wind loadings might apply.

Thankfully no one was injured in this incident however the hoarding fell into an area where third parties were present and the potential consequences are therefore very clear .

..-...2 •• , l Tie off or return brace end sections

I l

Deployment of Qukk Assemble hoardings.

• Always assemble as per the manufacturers instructions within a barrier demarcated and supervised work area that segregates third parties (staff, members of the public) at safe exclusion distances from the work.

• Ensure the hoarding is installed as per the agreed position marked on the construction issue phasing drawing and that the hoarding does not obstruct emergency fire escape routes.

• If the hoarding system is to extend into the ceiling space above, the asbestos survey register must be checked to ensure the ceiling spaces are free of asbestos containing material and are safe to enter.

• If the hoarding is to be installed _around live electrics or fire alarm systems, consultations must be made with a competent engineer and the management representatives onsite who are responsible for the building services.

• Ensure footing plates are set on level and firm surfaces and all panel sections are secured by the correct manufacturer supplied fittings and not retro fit clamps or ties .

• Ensure materials are not stored in close proximity to, or up against the hoarding and do not impose any loading on the hoarding.

• A recorded inspection of all quick assemble hoardings should be completed daily using the temporary works plan (HSF059) hoarding inspection form.

Assess Internal Wind loadings and introduce additional measures • Internal wind loadings can apply where hoardings are deployed near entrance lobbies, external doors in regular

use, service areas and building plant air handling and extraction. Site Management should risk assess and identify where wind loads and sudden gusts might arise imposing loads onto the hoarding.

• Based on the risk assessment findings, introduce measures to safe guard against internal wind loadings: weight down footings, ensure end sections are tied off to a secure supporting structure or are braced with return angle bracing. Installing lobbies into the work areas and incorporating lobbies into the hoardings will also assist with structural supporting of the hoarding and reducing wind load influence.

'/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////; - . . ·11-,·.

Autho.rised by: Phil Mason

• II • II • Tool Box Talk Procedural Review H&S Notice Board Supply Chain

Page 2: • II • II •

SIMPSON /////////////////////// ////////////

SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS FOR SUBCONTRACTORS 01\4 SIMPSON SITES

BEFORE ALLOCATING WORK TO SUBCONTRACTORS

In addition to the contractual agreements with subcontractors, the following requirements should be met prior to subcontracting companies being allocated work on a SIMPSON site:

• All subcontractors should have registered with Constructionline and be able to provide proof of registration.

• Their operatives should hold valid CSCS cards for the job role being conducted on site.

• All operatives attending site should have certificated proof of attending and achieving a pass rate on a UKATA or ITAP Asbestos awareness course.

PRIOR TO ARRIVING ON SITE

r~ * J ,~1· construction 1ne

The following documentation should be forwarded by the subcontracting team to the Contracts Manager for review and approval:

CO~STRt;CTIQN SKILLS CERTIFICATIO'i SCHEME

ON ARRIVAL AT SITE

1. Risk Assessments pertinent to the tasks being conducted on site 2. Method statements detailing the process for the tasks 3. COSHH assessments with Material Data sheets for the hazardous materi ­

als they propose to use on site

The following documentation should be brought to site with the subcontractors attending for induction: • CSCS CARD, ASBESTOS AWARENESS CERTIFICATE, RELEVANT QUALIFICATION CARDS /CERTIFICATES

iV.

it a. Risk Assessments pertinent to the tasks being conducted on site b. Method statements detailing the process for the tasks

PAPER COPIES OF:

c. COSHH assessments with Material Data sheets for the hazardous materials they propose to use on site.

The paper copies MUST be signed at induction by the relevant subcontractor attending site to state they have read and understood the information.

- - ... - "- I ,...,. .. -• ~ I I.,...

The subcontracting company should provide a supervisor to oversee their activities on site. Along with their general supervisory duties, the subcontractor supervisor will be responsible for: a. Conducting and documenting regular site inspections for the progress of the job and the H&S issues

associated with their work activity and providing a copy of the information to the SIMPSON site man­agement team

b. Conducting weekly toolbox talks to their teams and provide a register of attendees to the SIMPSON site team

c. 'Clean as you go' housekeeping regime on all SIMPSON sites- clearing and removing debris in a timely manner.

Page 3: • II • II •

SIMPSON TOOL BOX TALK HOT WORKS!

Process fire risks What you need to do

The Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005 sets out !.! 1t:1 laYL t9 on construction site general fire

safety, including means of escape.

The COM Regulations 2015 :i:;:i also impose duties including the requirement to prevent risk from fire. The

fire risk from site activities must be assessed and precautions taken to control:

• Combustible material - the quantity of combustible materials on site should be kept to the minimum and

all such materials safely stored and used.

• Ignition sources - action is needed to eliminate, reduce and control ignition sources on site.

Construction of timber frame buildings will require significant additional measures to those outlined here.

You should refer to the specific guidance listed in Resources, below.

What you need to know

Each year there are a number of serious fires on construction sites and buildings undergoing

refurbishment. Many could be avoided by careful planning and control of work activities.

Any outbreak of fire threatens the safety of those on site and will be costly in damage and delay. It can also

be a hazard to people in surrounding properties.

Page 4: • II • II •

} Fire can be a particular hazard in refurbishment work when there is a lot of dry timber and at the later

stages of building jobs where flammable materials such as adhesives, insulating materials and soft

furnishings are present

Combustible material

Many solids, liquids and gases can catch fire and bum. It only takes a source of ignition, which may be a

small flame or an electrical spark, together with air. Preventive actions that can be taken include:

• Quantity: fire risk can be reduced by controlling the amount of combustible material in the work area

until it is needed;

• Flammability: it may be possible to specify materials that are less combustible. Remember that when

worked on, materials may become more easily ignited eg solids turned to dust or crumb;

• Storage: combustible materials should ideally be stored outside buildings under construction, especially

volatile materials eg LPG. Internal storage must be planned and located where it will not put workers at

risk;

• Rubbish: good housekeeping and site tidiness are important to prevent fire and to ensure that

emergency routes do not become obstructed ;

• Volatile flammable materials: extra precautions are needed for flammable liquids, gases and oxygen

cylinders especially when internally stored;

• Coverings and sheeting: protective coverings and scaffold sheeting may add to fire risk. This can be

reduced by use of flame retardant materials;

• LPG:. liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) is widely used in construction eg in connection with bitumen boilers

and site accommodation. LP<3 has been involved in many serious fires and explosions, particularly

where there have been leaks in confined areas. Strict precautions are required where LPG is stored and

used; and

• Tanks and services: demolition projects can involve an increased risk of fire and explosion.

Dismantling of tank structures may cause ignition of flammable residues or disruption and ignition of

buried gas services.

Ignition sources

It is important that you take action to control ignition sources including:

• Hot work: all hot work generating heat, sparks or flame can cause a fire. Precautions include:

o clearing the area of combustible materials;

o suitable fire extinguishers: and

Page 5: • II • II •

o maintaining a careful watch throughout the work.

o a permit to work (PTW) system can help manage the risk on larger projects.

• Plant and equipment: select electrical and engine driven plant of suitable capacity to prevent

overheating. Fasten lamps to a solid backing and, if mounted on tripods, make sure the tripod is stable.

Electrical equipment in flammable atmospheres must be suitable for the nature and extent of the

flammable atmosphere;

• Smoking: bring the rules on smoking to the attention of all workers and visitors to the site and enforce

them;

• Electrical installations: should be of sufficient capacity for the intended use and designed, installed,

inspected and maintained by competent people;

• Bonfires: should not normally be allowed on site. There should be alternative arrangements for the

proper disposal of rubbish and waste;

• Arson: measures should be in place to prevent unauthorised site access. Sites with high fire loading or

a history of vandalism and arson may need additional measures eg lighting, out-of-hours security or

CCTV.

Page 6: • II • II •

SIMPSON

CONSTRUCTION MANAGER RECEIVES A 6 VEAR PRISON SENTENCE FOLLOWING EMPLOYEE'S FATAL FALL FROM HEIGHT

The director of a demolition company has been jailed for gross negligence and manslaughter after two employees fell from a roof on the same day. Mr Scott Harrower sustained fatal head injuries from his fall and his colleague sustained life changing injuries.

On the 8th April 2016, Mr Alan Thompson of Building and Dismantling Contractors Ltd was jailed for six years, fined £400,000 and was ordered to pay £55,000 court costs for offences committed under Section 2 of the Health and Safety at Work Act and for breaching Regulations 4 and 7 of the Work at Height Regulations. Mr Thompson not only failed to plan and provide a safe method of work, but also failed to act on a significant near miss event and a serious accident, both of which occurred prior to the fatal accident.

The Principal Contractor for the project, C. Smith and Sons, were also prosecuted and found guilty of safety offences. The owner, Mr Michael Smith was jailed for eight months, fined £90,000 and ordered to pay £45,000 court costs.

CPS

Mr Scott Harrower died following a fall from height through an unguarded skylight during the demolition work.

The work required dismantling of a steel corrugated sheet roofing with interspersed plastic skylights, which had deteriorated over time and had subsequently been covered with corrugated steel sheets in a bid to weather proof them.

The court heard it was originally planned that machinery would be used to remotely bring down the roof structure, a method that would have entailed minimum risk to the workers. However between winning the contract and the work being carried out, the decision was taken by Mr Smith.that the building should instead be dismantled piece by piece, meaning workmen would be required to work at height to remove the roof sheets prior to the structure being unbolted.

On the 20th January 2014, Mr Harrower accidentally stepped through a skylight and nearly fell the 30 feet to the concrete floor below. However, this significant near miss did not prevent the men from returning to carry out their work the next day.

At 9am on Tuesday 21st January 2014, another worker fell through a skylight to the concrete floor below, fracturing his spine, pelvis, right leg, heel and wrist. Despite such an horrific incident, the men were ordered by Mr Thompson to return to work just hours later. At 4pm that same day Mr Harrower fell through a skylight to the concrete below sustaining fatal head injuries.

The HSE Chief Inspector Richard Eales for the prosecution concluded:

"It is clear from the evidence that both Mr Smith and Mr Thomson saw an opportunity to make a quick profit without any thought for the workers they sent on to the roof, and as a direct result of that greed Mr Harrower died and another man suffered life-changing injuries. Thankfully, the jury saw through their attempts and both now can face justice for the decisions that they made, decisions that have robbed one family of a loving partner, father, and son, and another of a man's ability to live a life untainted by severe physical injury."

Page 7: • II • II •

SIMPSON

Leai"ning OL.tcomes from a serious incident ;nvo.ving falling materials

The incident, on a SIMPSON site, involved a full roll of flooring material being knocked over as the floor layers were transporting the rolls onto site. The large roll fell on to an operative who was bent over preparing the floor surface with his back to the material storage activity.

This incident resulted in the operative sustaining internal injuries requiring hospital t reatment. The injured person has been off work for a number of weeks and is still undergoing investigative tests at the hospital as an out patient.

Following on from this serious incident; the investigation established that the injured party had not attended a site induction or signed off on the appropriate risk assessments and method statements to indi­cate that he had read and understood the content.

The risk assessment and method statement relating to the transport­ing of materials and storing of materials had not been presented to the site team.

LEARl\ll uS AND ACTIONS TO BE TAKEN

1. Site Management MUST ensure ALL individuals attending site have been inducted and a copy of the induction record is filed.

2. Site Management should also ensure that they receive copies of Risk Assessments and Method statements for unloading and transportation of goods onto site; including material storage on site.

3. Materials should be located in an area where they can be easily accessed, however this should not be in an area where they will be knocked over or damaged.

4. Ensure all operatives are made aware of other trades work activities and actions that may impact on their work, or the area they are working in, by conducting a communication briefing at the start of the work period.

5. Ensure all operatives attending night shift are inducted on to site without exception i.e. even if they have at­tended a day shift induction, the situations and hazards on night /evening shifts may be different to day shift i.e. different fire exits/ alarm evacuation.

6. Daily shift briefings on hazardous operations/ storage arrangements should be conducted with the site team when applicable.

7. When an accident or incident occurs on site, once the injured party has been dealt with, a member of the HSQE team MUST be informed as soon as possible. They will be able to assist with the accident investigation if neces­sary. This also applies to minor accidents.

Page 8: • II • II •

'////////////////////////////////////////./././//////.

Changes to Hazardous Waste Regulations What are the changes?

There are two key changes to the regulations :

1.Premises Registration

Under current regulations any premises producing 500kg or more of hazardous waste per year must register their premises with the Environment Agency . From 1st April 2016 premises in England will no longer need to regist er their premises with the Environment Agency. This can be done on the Gov website via the attached link - cost is £18.00

https://www.gov.uk/hazardous-waste-producer-registration

2.Consignment Note Changes

To accommodate the removal of premises registration, the format of the consignment note code which appears on every consignment note, will change from 1st April 2016. For waste produced in England, the first six characters of the consignment note code, which is currently the premises registration number must be replaced by the first six letters or numbers of the business name. The producer should ensure consistent use of the organisation name.

These changes only apply to England, premises in Wales should continue to register with Natural Resources Wales.

SIC Codes

1he requirement for the SIC code on the consignment note will also change as of 1st April 2016. Currently SIC 2003, SIC 2007 or NACE is accepted on consignment notes. The change in regulations from 1st April 2016 specifies that SIC 2007 is used on all consignment notes which matches the legal requirements for waste transfer notes (for non­hazardous waste).

Other useful links :

https ://www. gov. u k/how-to-classify-d iff ere nt -types-of-waste

https://www.gov.uk/dispose-hazardous-waste

Page 9: • II • II •

\

TOOL BOX TALK: HOUSEKEEPING

Some people think it's a waste of time. But if you spend just a few minutes p icking up, you might keep someone from slipping or tripping. You could prevent an injury that keeps them off work for weeks or even months. Five minutes to save months offwork­it's a good investment. And next time, it could be you who gets hurt.

Housekeeping is everyone's job--every trade, every worker, and every supervisor. And it's a job you should do every day-not just once a week or when a project is over. The first rule is to do your work neatly in the first place, and clean up after yourself. Good housekeeping does more than prevent injuries--it can save you time, and it can keep your tools from being lost, damaged, or destroyed.

What can you do to prevent slips, trips, and falls?

• If you see a mess, take care of it. Don't wait for someone else to clean it up. Pick up anything you see lying around, especially if it could trip someone or fall.

• If you find someone's tools or equipment around, move them out of the way. Put them somewhere safe, but visible.

• Immediately clear scrap and debris from walkways, passageways, stairs, scaffolds, and around floor openings.

• Make sure the ground is level and well-graded within six feet of buildings. • Keep storage areas and walkways free of holes and obstructions. • Clean up spills of grease, oil, or other liquids at once. If it 's not possible, cover

them with sand or some other absorbent material until they can be cleaned up. Someone might slip.

• Coil up extension cords, lines, welding leads, hoses, etc. when not in use. • Make sure there's adequate lighting. If a light is out, report it. Replace it

immediately if you can. • Watch the weather closely and monitor both interior and exterior walkways. • Keep exit paths free from obstruction.

Remember, our actions can have a significant impact on others. A clean and orderly workplace shows you take pride in your work and makes everyone's work environment more pleasant.

• Environmental Management Consulting, Inc. 1-800-279-2020 www.emc-wi.com

Page 10: • II • II •

SIMPSON '////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////,'

QUALITY INSPECTION AND TEST PLAN A recent fatality in the shop fitting industry highlights the importance of ensuring that on all SIMPSON

projects there is a quality inspection and test plan developed (refer to appendix section of the Construction Phase Plan) with quality inspections undertaken and recorded during all key phases of the construction phase

works i.e. demolition, soft strip, civils, construction, commissioning and testing phases.

Michael Kelly, 26yrs and a joiner from Glasgow, was killed when he was struck by falling signage and a fascia assembly, during shop fitting work at a retail unit.

The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) investigation found that the company failed to properly assess the supporting arrangements for the signage and fascia assuming they were supported by steel hangers and that it would be safe to remove the shop fronts.

The employer cohcerned pleaded guilty to breaching Section 2 (1) and Section 3 (1) . of the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 and was fined £85,000 with £89,053

costs.

• At the outset of every SIMPSON project the Contract Manager and the Project Manager (or Site Manager) must complete the Quality Inspection and Test Plan included in the Construction Phase Plan. All key quality inspection events applicable to the construction work should be included with details of who is to undertaken them and the dates when the inspections are forecast to be undertaken.

• The Quality Inspection Plan should be reviewed and updated routinely thereafter, especially where design changes are imposed on the project. This will ensure inspection checks continue to reflect the quality management of construction phase works being undertaken onsite.

• The Design Team should be consulted e.g. structural engineer, to clarify their level of participation in quality inspections and sharing of the responsibility to inspect and sign off elements of work. Design Teams may stipulate certain contract conditions around quality inspections that will need to be identified within the contract documents and incorporated into the Quality Inspection Plan.

• The SIMPSON inspection forms for QA inspections of e.g. demolition, civil works, superstructure, structural frame, walls, internal finishers etc. are all loaded onto Q Pulse Management System. Should there be any problems finding the appropriate QA inspection forms, please contact Denise Forster, Systems Coordinator, or a member of the HSQE Team.

·~--- ..... ... __ _

1-_-L-_- _.:._ - ........... -

0 .• s -- I ~--... - ,----- 1 -- ,_"' __ _ ...... ..,,_ .::, .:. ..

_..,._ . ..._,,....._ --.... --..... - -... __ ,...._ ... ___ _._.

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Page 11: • II • II •

optimise ..

Toolbox Talk

Hand Arm Vibration

Introduction

Hand arm vibration syndrome is a condition resulting from exposure to vibration.

Hand-arm vibration is vibration transmitted into a person's hands and arms. This can

come from use of hand-held tools such as grinders or pneumatic breakers, and hand­

guided equipment such as powered pedestrian controlled floor saws.

Health effects

Regular and frequent exposure to hand-arm vibration can lead to two forms of

permanent ill health known as:

• Hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS); best known as 'vibration white finger'

(VWF) which is caused by the effects of vibration on the body's blood

circulation.

• Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS); a condition affecting the nerve in the wrist that

supplies feeling and movement to parts of the hand. It can lead to numbness,

tingling, weakne?s, or muscle damage in the hand and fingers.

Have you ever had a tingling in the hands after using a hand tool for example a sander

or drill? That tingling is a very mild form of vibration induced white finger. Such tingling

after short term exposure should stop after a short while. Prolonged use can cause

constriction of blood vessels that may lead to permanent symptoms that could be as

severe as loosing the feeling in the tips of the fingers.

How does this affect me?

Imagine if you were to lose the feeling in your fingers, day to day tasks would be much

more difficult. For example, doing up buttons, opening packets or jars. We really rely on

our hands!

To give a small insight into the effects of vibration white finger, take the 'lOp test'

TBT 042 16.4.13 Page 11

Page 12: • II • II •

Step 1- take a 10p coin and place it on a flat surface.

Step 2- pick the coin up without sliding it, and notice how the feeling in the fingers help you

optimise ..

Step 3 - finally repeat step 2, this time wearing a general purpose glove

This may be a crude example, but notice how picking the coin up wearing gloves gave no

feeling in the fingertips at all, and the task was much more difficult as a result.

Control measures

Elimination

Eliminate the need to use vibration equipment where possible. For example, can the route of a pipe be designed and routed away from an area where concrete breaking would be required in order to lay the pipe. Substitution Use an alternative operation to achieve the same aims, but with a lower risk. For example, selecting a machine operated breaker over a hand-held. Engineering controls .

Reduce the risk by engineering means. For example, specify hand operated hydraulic breakers that have been engineered to produce less vibration than older equiva lent models. Management control Select the right tool for the job, and ensure it is regularly maintained. Provide training and supervision to make sure the equipment is used correctly and personnel are aware of the risks associated with the equipment. Provide frequent work breaks and job rotation to allow for exposure to be equally distributed, reducing an individual's exposure. Personal protection

Warm gloves and clothing can help reduce risk, by keeping the hands warm, and improving blood flow. Additional measures include regularly exercising hands and fingers during work periods and avoiding smoking. 'Anti-vibration gloves' should not be considered as a means of control as they may have little effect at the most hazardous frequencies and, in some cases, may increase the vibration reaching the hand.

TBT 042 16.4.13 Page I 2

Page 13: • II • II •

SIMPSOI /////////////~////////////////////////////////////////////////////

·nor acci en s 1n Fe ruar '=urther to the safety alert issued in December 2015 where an operative was injured on an ISG site: SIMPSON have

10w had a very similar incident on one of our sites.

Vlinor Accident 1:

\ contractor received a puncture wound to the sole of his foot when he trod on a timber with nails protruding from it.

rhe contractor suffered a puncture wound requiring first aid treatment on site. On investigation it was found that the

;afety boot did not feature midsole protection and was only 'SB' (Safety Basic) rated (as per EN ISO 20345:2011 stan­

:lard). Had the boot featured midsole protection the foot injury is unlikely to have occurred.

_. r I •

ro went further reoccurrence: r , .,. .. . ., .. -• Ensure all timbers are de-nailed / removed frotn site during regular housekeeping exercises

• All safety boots worn on SIMPSON sites must feature steel / safety toe cap and midsole protection as a mini­

mum requirement

• Check operatives footwear during their site induction. labels within the boot will indicate Midsole Penetration

Protection (P). The boots should fall into one of the following categories: SB-P, Sl-P, S3 or SS

• Contractors must undertake regular checks of their PPE to ensure it is maintained to a serviceable standard

and replace any damaged PPE accordingly ,, , ,.,_ . 0;i , .., , • • < -'I ~l , 1• ....... f • I •

Vlinor Accident 2

\n agency Joiner working on a chop saw received laceration injuries to right hand when

1is hand came into contact with the blade, resulting in 6 days off work, plastic surgery

m l.._ itches to right hand. The HSQE accident investigation identified the direct root

~~~~ ... cause for the accident as 'unsafe work practices'.

/ The equipment was set up correctly; however the

. • ~ timber was not clamped to prevent it 'kicking back'

~ during the saw cut. An unsuitable method of feed-

· .' ,,,,,. ing wood through the chop saw was adopted involving the crossing of arms and

drawing the right hand holding the timber in towards the cutting blade whilst oper·

ating the saw with the left hand.

SIMPSON site management teams please ensure toolbox talks are presented on using tools and equipment in the

correct manner.

Also please reiterate to all working or visiting the site that all safety footwear worn on site MUST have steel toecaps

and steel midsoles.

Page 14: • II • II •

'"'-;

Health & Safety Risk Management System

H2 - Toolbox Talk Asbestos

--------------

The aspect that must be considered when working with or near asbestos is exposure to harmful levels of asbestos dust.

-+ Asbestos breaks into tiny, long, sharp fibres. These fibres can get lodged in the lungs and scar them, causing asbestosis or fibrosis. This can lead to lung cancer.

-+ Smokers are at a greater risk of asbestos related diseases.

-+ The most common use of asbestos is in the following products:

-+ Sprayed asbestos fire protection

-+ Asbestos cement building products

-+ Asbestos insulating board

-+ Asbestos millboards

-+ Textured ceiling finishes (ie paint and artex)

-+ Roofing felt

-+ Floor tiles and coverings

4 Lagging.

-+ On no account must work involving the installation, disturbance, or stripping out, of asbestos materials or coatings be undertaken by company employees unless they are fully trained in asbestos removal, have appropriate PPE, and the responsible manager has supplied them with a permit to work.

-+ Do not blow dust out of brake drums or clutch housings with an air line. Use proper drum-cleaning equipment or wet rags, and put used rags in a plastic waste bag before they dry out.

-+ Never use a brush to clean up asbestos dust. Use a special vacuum cleaner or wet the dust thoroughly and scrape it up.

-+ Do not grind, drill or abrade asbestos unless the machine is fitted with a vacuum filtration system.

-+ Wear the personal protective equipment which is specified by the manager. Put disposable overalls in a plastic waste bag after use and tie firmly.

-+ Never dispose of asbestos waste unless you have been given specific instructions to do so from your manager.

REMEMBER, IF YOU SUSPECT ASBESTOS IS PRESENT, STOP WORK IMMEDIATELY AND INFORM YOUR SUPERVISOR.

f-'2 - Too'oox To:k: Asbestos 1 / 2

".~ QMJ PJb"sh'"'g Lto

Produced 'n ossociot;cn \vith The lnst1LJte at Quany''"'Q