Let's Get Engaged

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<ul><li> Lets Get Engaged Logan H. Aimone, executive director National Scholastic Press Association Online: slideshare.net/loganaimoneFriday, March 16, 12 </li> <li> What is social media? Its the use of Web-based and mobile technologies to turn communication into interactive dialogue. Lets Get EngagedFriday, March 16, 12 </li> <li> How journalists use social media Distribution: Sharing / referring content Crowdsourcing Searching for sources or subjects Interviewing Monitoring Story ideas User feedback / engagement Lets Get EngagedFriday, March 16, 12 </li> <li> Primary social media journalists use (or should): Facebook / LinkedIn Google+ Twitter Vimeo / YouTube / Flickr Geolocating: Foursquare, Google Latitude/Maps, Gowalla, etc. Pinterest Lets Get EngagedFriday, March 16, 12 </li> <li> Lets Get EngagedFriday, March 16, 12 </li> <li> FACEBOOK: Denition and statistics Among worlds largest social media websites with more than 845 million monthly active users (December 2011) who create a network of friends 425 million mobile users (December 2011) Average user has 130 friends 50% of users return daily to the site Photos are most popular shared and viewed item 280 million photos uploaded per day Source: Facebook + Journalists, July 2011 Lets Get EngagedFriday, March 16, 12 </li> <li> FACEBOOK: Impact If searching for the news was the most important development of the last decade, sharing the news may be among the most important of the next. Navigating News Online, Pew Research Centers Project for Excellence in Journalism, May 2011 Facebook drove 3% of trafc to 21 of 25 news sites in study, and 8% of trafc to Hufngton Post. Headlines have been organized by editors. Now they are organized by friends. Lets Get EngagedFriday, March 16, 12 </li> <li> FACEBOOK: Statistics Users are 3-4 times more likely to click Like for a story if they see a friends face as someone who liked the story. Journalists who post content on a page or prole are likely to get more trafc if they Use a 4- or 5-line post Ask a question Include a thumbnail or photo Source: Facebook + Journalists, July 2011 Lets Get EngagedFriday, March 16, 12 </li> <li> FACEBOOK: Proles &amp; Pages A Facebook Prole is the standard user experience. An individual develops a personal network of friends (up to 5,000) and can share status updates, photos, links and videos. With the Subscribe feature, you can determine who sees which updates even targeting updates to certain groups. A Facebook Page is a more professional site where a journalist can share and interact while maintaining the traditional separation from sources and avoiding conicts of interest. You can distribute, engage and have a public presence and no limit to connections. Source: Facebook + Journalists, July 2011 Lets Get EngagedFriday, March 16, 12 </li> <li> FACEBOOK: Pages Nicholas Kristof of the New York Times uses Facebook to tell microstories. He says a good story is a good story on Facebook. Source: Facebook + Journalists, July 2011 Lets Get EngagedFriday, March 16, 12 </li> <li> Lets Get EngagedFriday, March 16, 12 </li> <li> FACEBOOK: Pages During breaking news, post often. Readers expect it. Engagement increases. Be transparent about whos posting. Tag the person posting, or indicate in the text. Pages allow targeted distribution based on gender, age, location, language, etc. Provide a behind-the-scenes look Source: Facebook + Journalists, July 2011 Lets Get EngagedFriday, March 16, 12 </li> <li> FACEBOOK: Crowdsourcing Crowdsourcing is using the crowd to provide ideas, sources, information and leads. Submitted content Enlisting readers in the process Story ideas Direct access to the source (source available to respond to questions via Facebook, etc.) Using Questions feature for high engagement Let viewers decide content Source: Facebook + Journalists, July 2011 Lets Get EngagedFriday, March 16, 12 </li> <li> FACEBOOK: Other items Feeds dont work. Theyre impersonal and automated. Readers engage when they know a person is behind the post. Find sources with Search. Search public updates. Search administrators of Groups. Videocalling (soon with Skype) for interviews facebook.com/journalists Source: Facebook + Journalists, July 2011 Lets Get EngagedFriday, March 16, 12 </li> <li> FACEBOOK: What you should do Build a network of Likes, because you will have a broader network for sharing. Use Insights to determine when the best time of day is for posting. Mid-day, 6 p.m., and late night are best, though your communitys peak may vary. You want engegement, which means you must improve reach. Use a long post. Ask a question. Include a thumbnail or photo. Lets Get EngagedFriday, March 16, 12 </li> <li> Lets Get EngagedFriday, March 16, 12 </li> <li> GOOGLE+: Denition and statistics Similar to Twitter, Google+ allows a Google user to both follow and be followed online. One signicant difference is the ability to group followers in circles and to determine what pieces of information are shared with which circle. People are not told the circle in which they are grouped. Additional features include the ability to save items to read later (compared to a linear stream of information), video chat in hangouts, and integration with other Google products like Gmail, Google Docs or YouTube. Lets Get EngagedFriday, March 16, 12 </li> <li> GOOGLE+: Denition and statistics The service launched June 28, 2011. In the rst two weeks, it grew to 10 million users and within four weeks over 25 million users. As of March 2012, it had more than 100 million users. After the rst few months, only about 12.5% of users were women. As of March 2012, about 29% of users are women. Google+ now has pages for businesses. Lets Get EngagedFriday, March 16, 12 </li> <li> GOOGLE+: Uses Because of the selective sharing options with Circles in Google+, a journalist could share some information publicly while some only with close friends. This avoids having people create two proles one public and one private to share with different audiences. Hangouts could become the next focus group, group interview or way to interact with reporters or sources. Sparks allows a user to identify interest areas, and Google will suggest items like a pre-search. The +1 button allows users to recommend items. Content can be downloaded. Lets Get EngagedFriday, March 16, 12 </li> <li> GOOGLE+: Big questions Will it replace Facebook? M</li></ul>