Delivering Highly Effective Presentations

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Delivering highly effective presentations is a skill that can be learned and developed. This deck highlights 10 tips that, when implemented correctly, can instantly make one a better presenter!

Text of Delivering Highly Effective Presentations

  • 1.Lance Baird VP, Business Strategy and Development DELIVERING HIGHLY EFFECTIVE PRESENTATIONS

2. Steve Jobs is often regarded as one of the best presenters of our day. 3. [ 3 ] [ 3 ] He wasnt just good. He was insanely great! How? 4. Implementing the following techniques will help (black turtleneck optional). 5. [ 5 ] [ 5 ] 10 Tips Delivering Highly Effective Presentations Lets get started 6. [ 6 ] [ 6 ] 1. Deliver residual messages. Delivering residual messages is critically important when presenting. 7. [ 7 ] [ 7 ] 10 Tips Deliver Residual Messages The main idea(s) you want left in the audiences minds after all else is forgotten Completes the following sentence: I want every member of my audience to understand and accept that ________________________ Characterized by four qualities Complete sentence Provable assertion Concise Specific (Source: Dr. Andy Gustafson, The Pennsylvania State University) If you wanted your audience to remember only one thing, what would it be? 8. [ 8 ] [ 8 ] 2. Repeat the residual messages. Delivering residual messages isnt enough. They must be repeated to stick. 9. [ 9 ] [ 9 ] 10 Tips Repeat the Residual Messages Message repetition and memory retention are highly positively correlated We forget 90% of what we learn in a class within 30 days We do the majority of this forgetting with the first few hours after the class It all hinges on the first 30 seconds of memory (Source: Dr. John Medina, author, Brain Rules, 2008) Repeat to remember! 10. [ 10 ] [ 10 ] Dr. John Medina is an accomplished author and an expert on this subject. 11. [ 11 ] [ 11 ] Hes also published a book for parents of small and unborn children. 12. [ 12 ] [ 12 ] 3. Treat the presentation like an event. If presentations are like an event, then youre the conductor. 13. [ 13 ] [ 13 ] 10 Tips Treat the Presentation Like an Event People do business with people they like Therefore, its important to sell ourselves in addition to the organizations we represent As hosts of the meeting, we bear the responsibility of creating a highly organized, memorable event Send an agenda Deliver the presentation by the agenda Keep the party going Follow up with action items in writing speed counts! Simple things we likely already know. Keep them in practice! 14. [ 14 ] [ 14 ] 10 Tips Treat the Presentation Like an Event "One easy way to improve the level of trust, anytime and anywhere, is simply to increase the speed with which people respond to communication. When people return our calls or e-mails quickly, it sends a signal that we can rely on them because our connection, however distant, is important enough to claim some of their attention. Response time is one indicator of the degree of trustworthiness of the other individual. -- Art Kleiner, editor, strategy+business Respond to your colleagues and customers quickly. Speed counts! 15. [ 15 ] [ 15 ] 4. Speak extemporaneously. Keep it real. Be very well-rehearsed, but not robotic. 16. [ 16 ] [ 16 ] 10 Tips Speak Extemporaneously The extemporaneous mode of speaking is the most effective method of delivery for most presentations. This method of speaking gives the impression that the speaker is talking with the audience. Because the presenter will not be reading from a script, he or she can maintain eye contact with the audience and be open to any feedback the audience provides, such as a look of confusion or understanding. -- Axzo Press, LLC, Effective Presentations, 2002. Some more context on speaking extemporaneously. 17. [ 17 ] [ 17 ] 10 Tips Speak Extemporaneously (preparation) (formality) Impromptu Off-the-cuff with very little preparation Extemporaneous Thorough preparation with great spontaneity Manuscript Thorough preparation, written and read Memory Memorized, written and recited (Source: Dr. Andy Gustafson, The Pennsylvania State University) You can still use cue cards, just dont let them control your presentation! 18. [ 18 ] [ 18 ] 5. Research the audience. Another timeless principle to consider before the big day. 19. [ 19 ] [ 19 ] Whats in it for me? Your audience will be silently asking this question throughout your delivery. 20. [ 20 ] [ 20 ] LinkedIn is a simple, yet powerful, tool for audience research. 21. [ 21 ] [ 21 ] The Outlook Social Connector also is extremely helpful toward this end. 22. [ 22 ] [ 22 ] 6. Start strong, finish stronger. All presentations should have a strong opening and closing. Why? 23. [ 23 ] [ 23 ] 10 Tips Start Strong, Finish Stronger (attention) (time) (Source: Dean Minuto, SalesBrain) Optimal memory retention Limited memory retention Were naturally wired to remember the beginnings and ends of things. 24. [ 24 ] [ 24 ] 10 Tips Start Strong, Finish Stronger Starting the presentation Tell them what youre going to tell them (agenda) Establish rapport as quickly as possible Finishing the presentation Tell them what you told them (use residual messages) Be gracious Ask for Q&A A few tips to optimize your presentations start and finish. 25. [ 25 ] [ 25 ] Author and speaker Tony Robbins is an expert on rapport and its meaning. 26. [ 26 ] [ 26 ] 7. Wake up the audience often. If you see a similar scene when youre presenting, its likely not going well. 27. [ 27 ] [ 27 ] Limited memory retention 10 Tips Wake Up the Audience Often (attention) (time) (Source: Dean Minuto, SalesBrain) Optimal memory retention How can we keep our audience engaged throughout the presentation? 28. [ 28 ] [ 28 ] Limited memory retention 10 Tips Wake Up the Audience Often (attention) (time) (Source: Dean Minuto, SalesBrain) Optimal memory retention How can we increase the frequency of their attention spans? Change! 29. [ 29 ] [ 29 ] The visual medium (e.g. PPT, handouts, flip charts, videos) The physical state of the audience (e.g. sitting, standing, raising hands) The participatory state of the audience (e.g. from listening to interactive) Where you physically stand Who is presenting The topic of discussion The physical state of the room (e.g. turn the lights on/off) 10 Tips Wake Up the Audience Often Good rule of thumb change grabs attention Things you can change: The mood of the room (e.g. telling a joke) Using someones name Using the word you Your tone of speech Your inflection of speech Your pace of speech Your volume of speech PowerPoint animation PowerPoint content (e.g. facts, statistics, etc.) (Source: Daniel Willingham, author, Why Students Dont Like School, 2009) There are so many things you can change when presenting! 30. [ 30 ] [ 30 ] Another great read for those interested in learning how the mind works. 31. [ 31 ] [ 31 ] 8. Smile! Its time to show those pearly whites! 32. [ 32 ] [ 32 ] Studies have proven that its very difficult to frown when looking at someone who smiles In fact, others smiles actually suppress the control we usually have over our own facial muscles, compelling us to smile 10 Tips Smile! (Source: Ulf Dimberg, Sven Sderkvist, Journal of Non-Verbal Behavior, March 2011) When you smile, the audience views you as more competent, too! 33. [ 33 ] [ 33 ] 10 Tips Smile! (Source: Scott Adams, The Dilbert Principle)Ron Gutman gives an outstanding TED talk on the power of smiling. 34. [ 34 ] [ 34 ] 9. Vary the content. A presentation full of text is totally not the way to go. 35. [ 35 ] [ 35 ] While the mediums can vary greatly, highly effective presentations contain four types of content: Facts Statistics Testimonies Examples Pros and cons to each Usage depends largely on the audience 10 Tips Vary the Content (Source: Dr. Andy Gustafson, The Pennsylvania State University) Whats the balance? The answer largely depends on the audience. 36. [ 36 ] [ 36 ] 10 Tips Vary the Content (Source: Dr. Andy Gustafson, The Pennsylvania State University) Type Definition Pros Cons Audience Facts Matter of empirically verified reality Definitive and objective Boring and overwhelming (non-credible) Very hostile Statistics Applied math designed to collect and interpret data Definitive and objective Boring and overwhelming (non-credible) Slightly hostile Testimonies Evidence from a witness or expert Credibility Not relatable Slightly supportive Examples Specific, relevant event Clarity, humanizing, relatable Not relatable or believable, too generalizing Very supportive The word hostile should be interpreted as unfamiliar in this context. 37. [ 37 ] [ 37 ] 10. Practice as often as possible. My coach used to say, You play like you practice. Same with presenting. 38. [ 38 ] [ 38 ] No matter how busy you are, make time for practice Practice for flow and diction, then seek feedback Use an audio/video recorder Look for variation in speed or tone, distracting filters (e.g. um, er, like, you know, etc.) 10 Tips Practice as Often as Possible Always make time to practice. It will make a significant difference. 39. [ 39 ] [ 39 ] Consider Toastmasters for those seeking a supportive test audience. 40. [ 40 ] [ 40 ] Review 10 Tips Deliver residual messages. Repeat the residual messages. Treat the presentation like an event. Speak extemporaneously. Research the audience. Start strong, finish stronger. Wake up the audience often. Smile! Vary the content. Practice as often as possible. Give the best presentation of your career. You can do it! 41. Lance Baird VP, Business Strategy and Development DELIVERING HIGHLY EFFECTIVE PRESENTATIONS lance.baird@slackandcompany.com http://www.linkedin.com/in/lanceabaird