VISIONS OF THE BOREAL FOREST

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VISIONS OF THE BOREAL FOREST. Art, Science, Native Culture & Adventure in the North 2005 George River Recon Expedition Photo: Gary McGuffin. An exhibition and expedition project of the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History (NMNH). On the Capitol Mall in Washington D.C. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Text of VISIONS OF THE BOREAL FOREST

Slide 1

Art, Science, Native Culture & Adventure in the North

2005 George River Recon Expedition Photo: Gary McGuffinVISIONS OF THE BOREAL FOREST

An exhibition and expedition project of the Smithsonian Institutions National Museum of Natural History(NMNH)On the Capitol Mall in Washington D.C.

And the Wilderness River Expedition Art Foundation(WREAF)(On wilderness rivers all over)

2006 George River Expedition Crew, photo by Gary McGuffinWREAFs 2006 Main George River Expedition with from l-r: Lee Kromschroeder, Gary McGuffin, Robert Bateman, Lindsey Foggett, Joanie McGuffin, Jean-Louis Courteau, Rob Mullen, John Pitcher, Dr. Stephen Loring and Dr. Jim Evans4 The Boreal ForestSlate Islands Expedition September 2008Photo: Rob MullenThe Greatest Forest on Earth2006 George River ExpeditionPhoto: Gary McGuffinThe largest terrestrial ecosystem on the planet map: Canadian Boreal Initiative

The most intact and extensive wilderness in the worldValley of the Nutilillik, 2006 George River ExpeditionPhoto: Rob Mullen

The Boreal Forests sheer size creates an Ecology of Scale, making it a powerful factor in global climate, fresh water, indigenous cultures, wildlife habitat, bird breeding grounds, industrial resources and the human spirit

And it is in our backyard

The Boreal Forest comprises over one half of Canada and extends into the northern US and AlaskaLand of the Voyageurs Acrylic by John C. Pitcher from the 2001 Missinaibi ExpeditionWildlifeHuge boar black bear in the BarrenlandsPhoto by Cole Johnson, 2009 Trans-Labrador Expedition

CaribouThe vast expanses of intact habitat support population reservoirs for many species of mammals, many of which are threatened elsewhere in their ranges. Among them are some of the largest ungulate herds in the world; particularly the Woodland Caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou).

George River Caribou acrylic by Robert Bateman, 2006 George River Expedition

Caribou are icons of the rugged north and an indicator species for the Boreal Forest.

Labrador Bull Original graphiteby Cole Johnson from the 2008 Kamestastin Expedition

The George and Leaf River herds can total over a million animals during population peaks. Near Kamestastin Oil by Jay J. Johnson from Kamestastin 2008

Caribou are a mainstay of many native cultures, a key species ecologically and inspiring subject s to paint; they are a linking element throughout this project.Caribou Moon acrylic by Rob Mullen 2008 Kamestastin Expedition

Billions and Billions of Birds

Gyrfalcon original acrylic by Robert Bateman, 2006 George River ExpeditionFirst Nations and Inuit

InnuCreeAthabascanInuitCaribou cresting a ridge near KamestastinPhoto by Rob Mullen, October 10, 2008Kamestastin

Expeditions

Robert Bateman and Rob Mullen on the George River Photo: Gary McGuffin

Kalon Baughan on the De Pas River, 2009 Qubec/Trans-Labrador Expedition. Video by Rob Mullen

Rob Mullen running an R3 on the De Pas: Video by Rod Lawrence

Rob Mullen running an R3 on the De Pas: Video by Rod Lawrence