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“Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills” Regional Office of Education #35 Friday. October 9, 2009 8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Michael Heggerty, Ed.D. Presenter www.literacyresourcesinc.com [email protected]

“Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

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“Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”. Regional Office of Education #35 Friday. October 9, 2009 8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Michael Heggerty, Ed.D. Presenter www.literacyresourcesinc.com [email protected]. Please note:. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Page 1: “Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

“Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

Regional Office of Education #35Friday. October 9, 20098:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Michael Heggerty, Ed.D. Presenterwww.literacyresourcesinc.com

[email protected]

Page 2: “Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

Please note:

Participants are informed that all documents, including but not limited to handouts, slides, articles and other paper and electronic media used by Dr. Michael Heggerty in the course of conducting this inservice are owned exclusively by Literacy Resources, Inc. and that no reproduction (other than for classroom use with elementary students) or other such use of documents and materials is authorized without the explicit written consent of Dr. Michael Heggerty. Requests can be made to: [email protected]

Page 3: “Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

Today’s Agenda

Review phonemic awareness skills focusing on which ones are evidenced in early writing

Review sight vocabulary and talk about how it can be evidenced in early writing

Page 4: “Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

Today’s Agenda:

Discuss phonics skills and how we evidence these skills in early writing

Discuss structural analysis and how these skills will be evidenced in early writing

Page 5: “Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

Today’s Agenda:

Discuss the need to increase writing so that we can see more evidence of the mastery of their early reading skills

Discuss the correlation of reading-writing and their similarities to cognition

Page 6: “Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

Phonemic Awareness Skills

Phonemic Awareness Skills(easiest to most difficult)

I. Increasing Language AwarenessII. RhymingIII. Identifying OnsetsIV. BlendingV. Identifying Final and Medial

PhonemesVI. SegmentingVII. Substituting PhonemesVIII. Adding PhonemesIX. Deleting Phonemes

*** Letter Naming

Page 7: “Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

Sight Words:

Brave spelling versus conventional

Once posted, taught or tested = Brave spelling is not allowed

Sooner the better, as reading and writing fluency increases

Page 8: “Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

Scope and Sequence:

Letter/sound naming fluency

Sight word fluency

Sight word phrases fluency

Connected text fluency

Writing fluency of conventional sight words

Page 9: “Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

You need to know

When a word has been posted, taught or tested so that you can hold a student accountable for its mastery and use

I suggest a simple excel spreadsheet

Page 10: “Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

Week # Word Wall Words Additional WordsQuarter

1 red, blue, yellow, I, see, a 12 can, at, look, the, my, and 13 big, it, is, in, little, have 14 not, you, do, like, to, that 15 get, what, we, one, two, three 16 up, but, go, where, here, am yes 17 come, down, away, no, will an, if 18 all, are, find, make, play let, had 19 went, walk, did, saw, me him, draw 1 1st QTR - 58

Year Total - 5810 how, many, on, why, they learn, write 211 does, into, he, this, water cut, run 212 by, eat, sing, stop, them thing, may 213 help, now, said, so, who fast, says 214 for, some, good, too, want today, tell 215 jump, more, sleep, time, with last, then 216 bring, carry, hold, our, us must, his 217 came, know, out, she, there got, its 218 again, please, read, say, word try, ran 219 after, as, call, laugh, something just, take 2

2nd QTR - 70 Year Total - 128

20 every, made, mother, of, was gave, favorite 321 father, going, has, thank, very told, use 322 be, friend, pretty, soon, your girl, another 323 four, funny, long, watch, were day, I'm 324 about, any, ask, kind, over didn't, fun 325 buy, only, or, right, think isn't, nice 326 don't, from, hear, live, when best, night 327 around, her, new, old, show can't, next 328 been, first, found, start, together hard, teacher 3 3rd QTR - 63

Year Total - 191 29 animals, even, heard, most, their car, oh 430 because, better, give, people, put color, talk 431 much, shall, these, wish, work could, won't 432 before, cold, full, off, would brother, own 433 each, once, other, under, which sister, never 434 along, goes, great, idea, pull than, should 435 almost, knew, thought, took, picture children, wasn't 436 open, boy, always, move, school far, house 4 4th QTR - 5637/38 Assessment on all 1st grade sight words Year Total - 247

Page 11: “Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

Phonics Scope and Sequence

Know which skills you teach week by week so that you can hold students accountable

Correlate with phonemic awareness skills if possible

Cumulative week by week(I suggest an excel spreadsheet)

Page 12: “Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

Phonics

Week Days Phonics Skill 1 5 b, m, p 2 4 d, g, s 3 5 n, f, l, z 4 5 b, r, h, x 5 4.5 c, w, j, q 6 5 k, v, y 7 4 short a 8 5 short i 9* 4.5 short o 10 5 short u 11 5 short e 12 5 Digraphs 13 4 L blends 14 5 R blends (two letter blends) 15 5 R blends (three letter blends) 16 5 S blends (two letter blends) 17 5 S Blends (three letter blends) 18* 5 Review of blends and digraphs 19 4.5 Long/short vowels; silent e 20 4 Long/short vowels; vowel stands alone 21 5 Long/short vowels; adjacent vowels 22 5 5 vowel patterns review 23 5 Review 24 4 ar / or / ir / er / ur 25 4 au / aw 26 4 ou / ow 27 5 oi / oy 28* 5 oo / oo 29 5 - ing 30 5 Adding endings: -ing, -er, -ed, -s, -es 31 3.5 many jobs of “Y” 32 5 chunking 33 5 chunking 34 5 syllables 35 4.5 syllables 36 5 Review37/38* 5 Review

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Structural Analysis

Compound Word

Prefixes / Suffixes

Multi-syllabic Words

Page 14: “Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

Structural Analysis

World of proficient readers

Tell us when student are becoming more sophisticated in understanding word structure

Multisyllabic words should begin in Kindergarten

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Reading Skills Come Together in Writing

Page 16: “Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

Why Focus on Writing?

What?

Why?

How?

Page 17: “Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

Research about why we need to teach Writing:

“Adolescents entering the adult world in the 21st century will

read and write more than at any other time in human history.

They will need advanced levels of literacy to perform their jobs, run their households, act as citizens, and conduct their personal lives.”

-- Richard Vacca, Educator, Author

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“The Information Age places higher-order literacy demands on all of us…these demands include synthesizing

and evaluation information from multiple sources. American schools

need to enhance the ability of children to search and sort through

information, to synthesize and analyze the information they encounter.”

(2001)-- Richard Allington, IRA Past-President, Author

Page 19: “Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

“Writing aids in cognitive development to such an extent

that the upper reaches of Bloom’s taxonomy could not be

reached without the use of some form of writing.”

-- Kurht and Farris

Page 20: “Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

Quick write:

Write the six levels of Bloom’s taxonomy

Page 21: “Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

“Writing is how students connect the dots in their

knowledge.”--National Commission on Writing, 2003

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Remember…………“Children should spend less

time completing workbooks and skill sheets…there is little

evidence that these activities are related to reading

achievement.”

Becoming a Nation of Readers: The Report of the Commission on Reading. 1985. Richard C. Anderson, Elfrieda H. Hilbert, Judith A. Scott, and Ian A.G. Wilkinson

Page 23: “Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

Rather than workbooks….“Children should spend

more time writing. As well as being valuable in its own

right, writing promotes ability in reading.”

Becoming a Nation of Readers: The Report of the Commission on Reading. 1985. Richard C. Anderson, Elfrieda H. Hilbert, Judith A. Scott, and Ian A.G. Wilkinson

Page 24: “Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

From 2006 Results Now, “If education is going to enter an era of unprecedented effectiveness”…

“Writing has be to carefully taught because it is not a natural act. We often assign writing instead of teaching it. Very few students

receive careful, explicit instruction on how to improve a single element or feature of good writing – for instance, how to craft arresting introductory paragraphs, how to write more

effective sentences, or how to effectively select and integrate quotes or supporting evidence. Most are never given multiple

carefully sequenced opportunities to practice these individual elements, to receive feedback, and to study good examples that make these

elements clear.” -- M. Schmoker, 2006

Page 25: “Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

Turn and Talk

Share with someone when you recall learning to write.

Is there a teacher who comes to mind as the one who taught you HOW to write?

Page 26: “Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

Challenges to Teaching Writing:

Lack of Training Common Philosophy Knowing the Genres Choosing Topics How Much Writing to Do Writing Block Structure Teacher Modeling / Guided Practice /

Independent Practice Evaluation of Writing / Alignment

with State Rubrics

Page 27: “Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

Illinois State Goal #3

Students will write to communicate for a variety of purposes

Conventions – IAF Composition and organization Genres are defined in the state

standard

Page 28: “Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

Features of Writing:

• Focus• Support (E/P) or Elaboration (N)• Organization• Conventions• Integration

Page 29: “Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

Get to know the ISBE Writing Rubrics

Focus (score 1-6) Support or Elaboration (score 1-6) Organization (score 1-6) Conventions (score 1-3) Integration (score 1-6 x 2)

Page 30: “Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

Six + 1 Traits

• Organization• Ideas• Sentence fluency• Word Choice• Conventions • Voice• Presentation

Page 31: “Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

Steps to Writing

* One sentence on a topic* Multiple sentences on a topic

Focus sentence(s)Wrap-Up sentence(s)

* Complete paragraphAdding one specific support or

elaboration to each detail or sentenceAdding more than one support or

elaboration to each detail or sentence* Paragraphing main support ideas

Adding support sentences to the focusAdding support sentences to the wrap-up

* Multiple paragraphs

* = Benchmarks tasks

Page 32: “Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

Be sure to remember to tell them why?

Functional Purpose: To communicate for a specific purpose:ListsNotesLettersEmailsSchoolWork

Genres:Narrative:

To recount and reflect upon a significant experienceTo report and record reactions to an observed eventTo tell a story: beginning, middle, end

Expository:To explainTo interpretTo describe something based upon background experiences or information

provided in the promptPersuasive:

To take a position and develop one side of an argumentTo convince or persuade in a specific direction

Descriptive:To create with words a certain setting or moodTo use words that call upon the use of our sense to complete the written text

Creative:To express real or fantasized thoughts and feelings, usually in a story format

Page 33: “Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

Narrative Genre: Key Features

• Student experienced it or witnessed it

• Reactions and feelings MUST be present

• CANNOT preview• Transitional (prepositional) phrases• Must have closing

Page 34: “Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

Expository Genre: Key Features

• To describe, inform, explain in a factual manner

• Focus must make the subject clear• Must have closing• Can use “I, me, or my” but the

challenge is to not go “off-mode” (switch genres)

Page 35: “Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

Persuasive Genre: Key Features

• Position must be taken and kept• Reason – Why – Examples• Must maintain the position

throughout (Argumentative persuasive is not allowed until Grade 11)

• Must have closing

Page 36: “Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

How Much Writing?

The more they write, the more we learn about them!

The more they write, the more they are using higher level thinking skills.

Remember, the goal of writing is to communicate. The are lots of levels of communication!

Page 37: “Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

Exit Criteria

Kdg. – At least three independently written sentences focused on a topic with no interpretation

1st – An independently written cohesive paragraph on a topic

2nd – 5th – Multiple paragraph essay written in writing period of 45- 55 minutes

Page 38: “Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

Number of Student Writing Products

Product is any student written piece that shows you are working toward your grade level’s Exit Criteria

Some flexibility with 8 out of 12 weeks or 6 out of 9 weeks

Final copies: when and why?

Page 39: “Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

Questions on Products?

Page 40: “Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

Reading and Writing:

Just like independent reading needs to have a purpose for students to be most effective, so does writing.

Page 41: “Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

Types of Writing in Our Classrooms:

Journal or free writing

Extended response in reading

Problem solving in math

Focused Writing instruction in the defined State genres

Page 42: “Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

Gradual Release of Responsibility in Reading

Page 43: “Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

Focused Writing instruction in the defined State genres

Types of Writing

Messages ( Morning / Closing)Teacher Modeled Writing

Interactive Writing Guided Writing

Independent Writing

Teacher Dependent Student Independent

Page 44: “Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

Daily Writing Lesson Design

1. Establish a daily mini-lesson: Integrated into their writing andallows for accountability for

students (what you expect to see in their writing)

2. Writing activity instruction:Focus on an element of writing,

a piece of the process or the completion of a product

Page 45: “Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

Most of us were never taught how to teach writing to others

Five Day Writing Plan

Page 46: “Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

Topic Selection for Focused Writing Instruction

Science and Social Science topics are best sources

Reading topics on occasion (prior knowledge and connections)

Grades 3 and 5 must give some state-type prompts and teach students how to fake it if they don’t know

Page 47: “Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

Questions

Page 48: “Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

Example: Expository on Spiders

Page 49: “Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

Example: Narrative on a Field Trip

Page 50: “Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

Five Day Plan Review:

Day 1: Access prior knowledge Day 2: A feature of their writing

which needs work Day 3: Teacher modeling Day 4: Student independent written

piece Day 5: Conference Other types of writing on days 1 and

3?

Page 51: “Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

Five Day Plan and Writers’ Workshop

Control of genre

Control of topic

Control of “I don’t know what to write.”

Control of teacher sanity

Control of when to give time to publishing

Page 52: “Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

Great Resources for the Teacher:

o Craft Lessons – Fletcher & Portalupio Revisers’ Toolbox - Laneo Improving Writing K-8 – Lenski &

Johns

Page 53: “Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

Common Approach to Teaching Writing

Teacher talk

Organizer that worked for all levels of writers

Non-linguistic representations

Use of consistent rubric

Page 54: “Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

Organizers

Why do we use them?

How do we know they are working?

How much time do they require?

Do most proficient writers take time to use them?

Must be able to be for used with lower and higher level writers

Page 55: “Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

Organizer

Details or internal paragraphs

Page 56: “Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

Editing / Revisions

Editing:Who is doing the work?How much editing?Brave spelling

Revisions:Why to perfect copy?3 – P’s: Published, Public-reading = Perfect

Remember the IAF % for conventions!

Page 57: “Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

Turn and Talk

In break out sessions, plan to work on specific questions prepared for your discussion.

Be prepared to share

Page 58: “Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

Rubrics

Evaluation of writing needs to be common practice and evidence inter-rater reliability.

Page 59: “Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

Questions

Page 60: “Using Early Writing to Evidence Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words and Phonics Skills”

Thanks for being here!Best wishes for great successes!

[email protected]

www.literacyresourcesinc.com