TOWARD AN IMPROVED QUALITY OF LIFE - Minnesota AN IMPROVED QUALITY OF LIFE ... a project of the Legal Aid Society of Minneapolis, ... XIII. BEHAVIORAL SPECIAL NEEDS

  • View
    215

  • Download
    2

Embed Size (px)

Text of TOWARD AN IMPROVED QUALITY OF LIFE - Minnesota AN IMPROVED QUALITY OF LIFE ... a project of the...

  • TOWARD AN IMPROVED QUALITY OF LIFE

    QUALITY PROGRAMS FOR ADULTS WITH DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES

    A GUIDE FOR PARENTS, FAMILY MEMBERS AND ADVOCATES

    Legal Advocacy for Personswith Developmental Disabilities222 Grain Exchange Building

    323 Fourth Avenue SouthMinneapolis, MN 55415

  • Legal Advocacy for Persons with Developmental Disabilitiesin Minnesota, a project of the Legal Aid Society ofMinneapolis, has produced this guidebook with funds from agrant from the Office of Human Development Services of theUnited States Department of Health and Human Servicesawarded by the Administration on DevelopmentalDisabilities. The Legal Aid Society of Minneapolis, Inc. issolely responsible for the contents.

    As part of this grant, Legal Advocacy has also producedIndividual Habilitation Plan Review Forms for both theHome Environment and the Work or Day ProgramEnvironment Those Review Forms were developed by CathyMacdonald and Carol Rydell. Jane Wells of CreativeCommunity Options, White Bear Lake, Minnesota, assisted inthat process. She developed this guidebook on the basis of theReview Forms and provided the added comments.

    Consumer and advocacy organizations are encouraged toreproduce this guidebook for their own use. While an efforthas been made to state principles which are generally ap-plicable, practices prevalent in and rules applicable toprogram planning in Minnesota are evident in portions of theguidebook. Organizations which would like to modify thisguidebook to fit local practices and rules may obtain the discat cost A 5 1/4" disc in MS-DOS WordPerfect and an MS-DOS ASCII file are available.

    March 3, 1988

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS; TOWARD AN IMPROVED QUALITY OF LIFE Page

    PART ONE

    I. CASE MANAGEMENT....................................................................................... 1

    II. OVERALL PROGRAM ISSUES ....................................................................... 3

    III. STAFF TRAINING AND SUPERVISION........................................................ 9

    PART TWO

    IV. ENVIRONMENT ............................................................................................. 10

    V. MEALTIME OBSERVATION .......................................................................... 14

    VI. HEALTH AND SAFETY ..................................................................................... 17

    PART THREE

    VII. EVALUATING BEHAVIORAL OBJECTIVES .............................................. 20

    HOW WILL PROGRESS BE MEASURED AND EVALUATED ................. 25

    PART FOUR

    VIII. INDEPENDENT LIVING SKILLS ................................................................... 27

    IX. COMMUNITY INTEGRATION........................................................................ 30

    X. VOCATIONAL SKILLS..................................................................................... 33

    XI. LEISURE AND RECREATION SKILLS.......................................................... 36

    PART FIVE

    XII. COMMUNICATION ........................................................................................... 38

    XIII. BEHAVIORAL SPECIAL NEEDS .................................................................... 41

    XIV. PHYSICAL AND SENSORY SPECIAL NEEDS............................................. 45

    PART SIX

    XV. MAKING CHANGE HAPPEN. ......................................................................... 47

  • Introduction

    As a parent or family member of a person with developmental disabilities, you can be apowerful advocate. Webster's defines "advocate" as "one that pleads the cause of another."Persons with developmental disabilities need people in their lives who are willing to beadvocates, just as all of us need the support of a network of family, friends and associates.

    Parents want "what's best" for their sons and daughters; however, if your son or daughter hasa developmental disability, deciding "what's best" can be confusing and difficult. The "bestpractices" of just a few years ago are being challenged daily. Both scientific research andcommon sense are proving wrong some commonly held assumptions about the best ways tomeet the needs of people with developmental disabilities. Your interest in this projectaffirms your commitment to advocate for excellence in the services provided to your son ordaughter.

    What We Believe

    The "best practices" that are reflected in this guidebook are supported by research andaffirmed by values. The beliefs that have directed our efforts may seem obvious, but currentpractices show that implementing these ideas does not always come easily:

    All people, regardless of their ability, have the right to be treated with dignity andrespect.

    Personal preferences and individual choices should drive decisions about servicearrangements, developmental programming, and daily routines.

    People need a network of relationships to provide friendship and support. Segrega-tion is a barrier to full participation in community life. People with disabilities shouldbe living, learning, and working with people who do not have disabilities.

    We must not limit our understanding of individual potential. Our teaching strategiesshould focus on developing each person's level of participation in useful andmeaningful activities.

    Attitudes are changing--but we must continue to challenge our expectations for persons withdevelopmental disabilities by expanding our vision of what is possible.

    About the Guidebook

    This guidebook is intended for use by parents of persons with developmental disabilities (orsiblings, relatives, advocates, volunteers, or other interested persons) to evaluate theprograms of their sons and daughters. The six parts of the guidebook correspond to sixthree-hour training sessions. The information included in the guidebook and provided at thetraining sessions will enable you to complete a careful and detailed review of your son's ordaughter's residential and work or day program.

    Portions of the guidebook include sections for both the home environment and the work orday program environment. Brief explanations are added to some of the home environmentguidelines which apply to, but are not repeated in, the work or day program environmentguidelines.

    In order to complete a review of your son or daughter's programs and habilitation plan,

  • it is suggested that you spend four to six hours at each program site reviewing records,observing interactions, and talking to staff. You may wish to review some records at homerather than spending a long period of time at the program. However, you will need toobserve staff interactions with your son or daughter and take a careful look at the physicalenvironments.

    A Few Words About Words

    We believe that it is important to take care with the language we use when talking aboutpeople, especially people with disabilities. We tried to follow several guidelines in writingthis guidebook:

    Terms such as "the handicapped" or "the disabled" are archaic and demeaning. Likewise,labeling an individual with a disability in phrases such as "he is retarded" or "she is autistic"can reduce a person to one characteristic of his or her life experience. The use of initials orabbreviations in describing people, such as "he is CP," is another disrespectful practice. Thepreferred usage is to acknowledge the person first: person with mental retardation, orindividual with a developmental disability.

    In an effort to encourage age-appropriate language when referring to adults with disabilities,"sons or daughters" has been used rather than references to a child or children. In manyinstances, the choice of a gender specific personal pronoun was made randomly in order toavoid the somewhat awkward "he or she" or "his or her."

    -5-

  • PART ONE

    CASE MANAGEMENT AND PROGRAM PLANNING

  • I. CASE MANAGEMENT

    The items in this section focus on written plans that are the legal responsibility of the countycase manager in Minnesota. Each county may have a different format for defining this plan;you will most likely find the information that you need in a document called the "IndividualService Plan" or ISP.

    The ISP is the basic planning document used by the county case manager to arrange forservices for your son or daughter. You and your son or daughter should be involved in itsdevelopment The ISP must summarize assessment information, identify the type, amountand frequency of all services needed, state how and when these services will be obtained ordeveloped, and include long-range and annual goals for your son or daughter.

    The interdisciplinary team, which includes you, your son or daughter, the case manager, andall providers, will use the ISP to develop a single individual habilitation plan (IHP) orindividual program plan (IPP). This plan should include short-term objectives designed toreach the annual goals in the ISP. Both the ISP and the IHP should plan for services to beprovided in the "least restrictive environment"

    _______ 1. The ISP includes a summary of assessment information and of specificservice recommendations.

    Assessments are required in the following areas:

    a. medical status and ongoing health needs,b. physical development,c. intellectual functioning,d. social skills,e. self-care skills, f. communication skills,g. community living skills,h. vocational skills,i. physical and social environments, andj. need for guardianship or conservatorship.

    The summary should include specific service recommendations made by thepersons doing the assessments. The summary should also include how thephysical and social environment of the home and work settings will affec