Thinking About History

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Thinking About History. How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Social Studies. Happy Constitution Day!. Constitutional Fun Facts: The Constitution was signed by members of the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia on September 17, 1787. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Thinking About History

Thinking About HistoryHow I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Social StudiesHappy Constitution Day!Constitutional Fun Facts:The Constitution was signed by members of the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia on September 17, 1787.Only 39 of the original 55 delegates from 12 states signed; Rhode Island sent no delegates. It was not fully ratified until May of 1790.

Full DisclosureI am not a Social Studies Teacher.I am a Literacy Specialist.I spent three years as Project Director of a Teaching American History Grant.I am not an expert; I am still learning about History, Social Studies and historical thinking!

Sowhat can I share with you?What I have learned about the teaching and learning of history:a framework for how history worksa few thoughts about disciplinary literacy in social studiessome application of historical thinking skills

Over the Rainbow

IntoBalance of Content and SkillsStarting your historical thinking

The Gettysburg AddressOn your own, write for 2 minutesWhat do you know about the Gettysburg Address?What questions do you have about it?What do you think was the reaction to the Gettysburg Address at the time?Share your ideas with a partner for 2 minutes. Jot down any more thoughts you have as you share.

(Bain, 2000)How History Works8How History WorksHistory is interpretive.History is contested and contestable.History is an argument in favor of a particular narrative based on evidence.Some events or issues are more significant than others.

(adapted from Gifford, Kansas SDE, May 12, 2011 and Shanahan, 2013)How History WorksWho the author is matters. The authors purpose matters. A single text is problematic. Multiple texts are crucial.

(adapted from Gifford, Kansas SDE, May 12, 2011 and Shanahan, 2013)Literacy in Social StudiesEvery social studies lesson is a literacy lesson.Social studies instruction must explicitly attend to challenges in using and producing text . . . (even if you only want to teach the facts).Every social studies teacher is a disciplinary literacy teacher.

(Dr. Robert Bain, University of Michigan, November 4, 2012)We must focus on the literacy practices required to do the learning of history and social studies by making . . .all thinking visiblehistorical problems the organizer for instructioncognitive tools to help learnersdiscipline-specific texts accessible for learners

(Dr. Robert Bain, University of Michigan, November 4, 2012)History is contested and contestable.

We contest it through reading and writing, speaking and listening.

Time to

historically!The Gettysburg AddressOur historical problem:How did people living at the time think about what President Lincoln said at Gettysburg?Are these reactions similar or different to todays opinions about the speech and Lincolns ideas about democracy, government and community?Have American's views of their democracy, government and community changed over time?Does it make a difference?

11th grade content: Students will analyze the ideas expressed in the Gettysburg Address, considering its longterm impact.

15The Gettysburg AddressWith a partner:Read the speech (what is your reaction?)Read through the comments and reactions and decide:What does each reviewer think about the speech? What is your evidence?What factors might account for any differences of opinion?

Two-column note?16The Gettysburg AddressAs you read and discuss take note of your thinking.What are you paying attention to?What surprises you?What doesnt make sense?What questions are you asking?What connections are you making?What literacy skills are you using?

The Gettysburg AddressOur historical problem:How did people living at the time think about what President Lincoln said at Gettysburg?Are these reactions similar or different to todays opinions about the speech and Lincolns ideas about democracy, government and community?Have American's views of their democracy, government and community changed over time?Does it make a difference?

Over the Rainbow

IntoBalance of Content and SkillsDigging inCommon Core Learning Standards The kinds of reading and writing we want our students to know and be able to do in order to think critically and learn social studies contentCiting evidenceReading closelyWriting from sourcesConducting research

Digging inSocial Studies PracticesSocial science and historical thinking skills to prepare students for civic participation, college, and careers.Infused with social studies content a way of thinking in the social studies classroom

Vertical articulation K-1221Digging inSocial Studies PracticesGathering, Using and Interpreting EvidenceChronological Reasoning and CausationComparison and ContextualizationGeographic ReasoningEconomics and Economic SystemsCivic Participation

NYS K-12 Social Studies Framework Introduction, p. 9

What literacy skills from the Common Core Learning Standards were you using to think about our historical problem?Citing evidence?Reading closely?Writing from sources?Conducting research?

What Social Studies Practices were you using to think about our historical problem?Gathering, Using and Interpreting Evidence?Chronological Reasoning and Causation?Comparison and Contextualization?Geographic Reasoning?Economics and Economic Systems?Civic Participation?

NYS K-12 Social Studies Framework Introduction, p. 9

Thinking About the Rainbow

Things to think aboutCommon Core Learning Standards What kinds of reading and writing strategies do students and teachers need to be successful?What resources and support can we provide?

Things to think aboutSocial Studies PracticesWhat kinds of cognitive tools for disciplinary thinking do students and teachers need to be successful?What resources and support can we provide?

Resources to Check OutEngageNY (of course!)Stanford History Education Group:Reading Like a HistorianBeyond the Bubble - assessmentwww.sheg.stanford.eduTeachinghistory.org www.teachinghistory.org National Council for the Social Studieswww.socialstudies.org Thank you!