TEXTILE RECYCLING The Numbers on Textiles First waste characterization studies in Mass Textiles = 4.9%

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  • FNYSWA 2014 SPRING CONFERENCE

    TEXTILE RECYCLING WORKSHOP

    Brooke Nash MassDEP May 20, 2014

  • Why Textiles?

  • The Numbers on Textiles

     First waste characterization studies in Mass  Textiles = 4.9% of municipal solid waste

    disposed in Massachusetts  230,000 tons per year disposed (based

    on 2010 tonnage)  5.8% of residential waste disposed  3.7% of commercial/institutional waste

    disposed

  • Textiles Summit – September 2011

     Broad cross section of industry  Charities  Salvation Army  Goodwill  St. Vincent

     Graders, brokers  Wiping Cloth Manufacturers  Fiber Converters  State Recycling Organizaton

  • What we learned…

     Textiles category is broad  Bags, belts, hats, shoes, household linens,

    holey socks……  85% of textiles are going to disposal  All but 5% can be reused/recycled  Very forgiving market – the good, the bad

    and the ugly  Life cycle/market segments  Non-profits and for-profits play critical role in

    collection cycle

  • The “Perfect Recyclable”

     Textiles are not:  Hazardous  Bulky or awkward to handle /store  Smelly, attractive to vermin

     Extensive collection infrastructure  Stable market, high demand across

    sectors  Supports local business and non-profits  Triple bottom line

  • The Take-Aways….

     Need to communicate to public on wide range of textiles  Break down misconceptions about what is

    and isn’t acceptable to donate  Consensus reached across all sectors  “We want it all, with FEW exceptions”

  • Action Items from Summit

     Create statewide outreach initiative (on shoe string budget)  Hold regional workshops for municipal

    recycling coordinators  Issue joint press release (DEP/SMART)  Take message to state/regional recycling

    conferences  Provide outreach tools, templates to

    municipal coordinators

  • Local recycling coordinators are key!

     Held 5 regional meetings  Presented at 2 state conferences  Panel representing all sectors of industry  Big eye opener for everyone  SMART publicized meetings to media  Recycling coordinators energized – ready

    to spread the word  Non-profit, for-profit, municipal partnering

  • SMART Resources

     Template textile event flyer  Videos, PSAs – perfect for public access

    cable  Posters, display materials, handouts for

    community events  Recommendations on transparency policy  School curriculum  Regional coordination - textile collection

    events

  • Cambridge, MA – maps textile donation spots

  • Growing awareness

     Textile collections at DEP offices  Municipal tours at Salvation Army,

    Goodwill  Habitat for Humanity ReStores  Project Repat – Upcycling used t-shirts  News stories in dailys, weeklies, recycling

    columns  Municipal websites, social media  MassDEP Textile Recycling Updates

  • In the news…

  • Schools, Schools, Schools….

     MassDEP’s Green Team  e-newsletter to 400 teachers, administrators  Link to SMART’s curriculum on textiles

     School fundraising opportunity  Environmental education  Partnerships with for profit and non-profit

  • School Textile Recycling

  • Centerville Elementary – Green Team

  • Colleges/Universities

     Huge source of textile waste  College/University Recycling Council  Textile panel – January 2014

     Post Landfill Action Network (PLAN)  Project RePat – upcycling t-shirts  Goodwill – Boston University  Bay State Textiles – Tufts  Community colleges

  • Help for commercial generators

  • MassDEP Textile Web Page

  • Measuring progress

     Charities and for profit recyclers expanding collections:  New permanent donation sites  School partnerships  Dozens of spring and fall events  Curbside collection of textiles?

  • Goodwill Boston

     “The area of greatest impact on us since working with DEP has been connections to municipalities. You have brought us straight to the source….

     “Since 2011 we have opened 4 additional ADCs with plans to have 4 more open by June 2014. This can be directly attributed to the work done by/with DEP and their ability to connect us with municipalities.

    Email from Bill LaBelle – 3/26/13 Director, Retail Operations Morgan Memorial Goodwill Industries

  • More work to be done….

     Populate searchable database (Eco-Point)  Publish more case studies  Grants to support outreach, collection  Hold second “Textiles Summit”?  Gather more data  Survey textile recyclers?  Mass Chapter of Reuse Alliance (SMART

    on steering committee)

  • Questions?

     Brooke Nash  brooke.nash@state.ma.us  617-292-5984