Testing of IEC 61850 Compliant Smart Grid Devices

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<ul><li><p>1miqbal.ridwan@tnbr.com.my </p><p>Testing of IEC 61850 Compliant Smart Grid Devices: A Malaysian Experience </p><p>1M.I. RIDWAN, </p><p>1N.S. MISWAN, </p><p>1M.N. NORAN, </p><p>1M.S.M. SHOKRI, </p><p>2H.N. AWANG,</p><p>2A. MUSA </p><p>1TNB RESEARCH SDN BHD </p><p>2TENAGA NASIONAL BERHAD </p><p>MALAYSIA </p><p>AORC Technical meeting 2014C4-1093</p><p>http : //www.cigre.org </p></li><li><p> 2 </p><p>SUMMARY </p><p> One of the important aspects to ensure the success of a Smart Grid implementation is the ability of </p><p>the devices and systems in a Smart Grid domain to be able to seamlessly communicate and exchange </p><p>information with each other. This aspect, which is also referred as interoperability, is crucial for the </p><p>execution of functions that are defined in a Smart Grid domain, regardless whether it is a distributed or </p><p>centralized function. To ensure interoperability is implemented successfully in a Smart Grid domain, it </p><p>is imperative for power utilities to acquire know-now on the relevant open standard based Smart Grid </p><p>technologies that can ensure interoperability without fail. Smart Grid solutions with proprietary </p><p>technology may pose significant long term risks to utilities, such as expensive replacement of devices </p><p>and system extension due to over dependency to single vendor , low flexibility to define new </p><p>requirements and susceptible to technology obsolescence from the single vendor. </p><p>Interoperability in a Smart Grid domain is crucial to ensure the seamless information exchange </p><p>between devices and systems in the domain to execute their intended functions. Standardization bodies </p><p>such as the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE), International Electrotechnical </p><p>Committee (IEC) and National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have published </p><p>standards, guideline and roadmaps suggesting on the technologies that can enable seamless </p><p>interoperability between devices and systems in a Smart Grid domain. For communications related to </p><p>power system and electrical substations in Smart Grid domain, IEC 61850 standard has been </p><p>recognized as the open standard that enables interoperability through its standardized data models and </p><p>communication services. These data models and communication services are mapped to the </p><p>mainstream Ethernet technology, which has allowed IEC 61850 to be future proof regardless of the </p><p>advancements of communication technology. </p><p>As the public electric utility company in Malaysia, Tenaga Nasional Berhad (TNB) believes that the </p><p>integration of solutions from different vendors using open standard is the way forward and has the </p><p>promising potential to provide substantial cost savings in the near future. TNB has identified the IEC </p><p>61850 standard as the key enabler standard for this purpose and has included the standard as a part of </p><p>the long term technology implementation plan under the TNB Technology Road Map (TRM). To </p><p>ensure the successful implementation of IEC 61850 standard in a Smart Grid domain, TNB has </p><p>embarked in several initiatives, which are also defined in TNB TRM. The initiatives include the </p><p>development of an IEC 61850 laboratory, new product acceptance process for IEC 61850 compliant </p><p>devices and in-house software applications for IEC 61850 substations. These initiatives are vital for </p><p>TNB not only to pave the path to realize TRM vision, but also to obtain in-depth understanding </p><p>regarding IEC 61850 and to develop in-house expertise on the subject. Although IEC 61850 promises </p><p>interoperability, it is imperative for users to understand the detailed methodologies and know-how </p><p>specified in IEC 61850 to successfully achieve interoperability during the implementation stage. This </p><p>paper will discuss TNBs experience on the interoperability testing of IEC 61850 compliant devices </p><p>and highlights some of the findings which were observed during the execution of the initiatives above. </p><p>KEYWORDS </p><p> IEC 61850, Intelligent Electronic Devices (IEDs), Interoperability, Smart Grid, Substation Configuration Language (SCL), Substation Information Management System (SIMS), Substation </p><p>Protection, Automation and Control System (SPACS), System Verification and Simulation (SVS) </p><p>Laboratory</p></li><li><p> 3 </p><p>1. Introduction </p><p>Interoperability in a Smart Grid domain is crucial to ensure the seamless information exchange </p><p>between devices and systems in the domain to execute their intended functions. Standardization bodies </p><p>such as the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE), International Electrotechnical </p><p>Committee (IEC) and National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have published </p><p>standards, guideline and roadmaps suggesting on the technologies that can enable seamless </p><p>interoperability between devices and systems in a Smart Grid domain [1,2,3]. For communications </p><p>related to power system and electrical substations in Smart Grid domain, IEC 61850 has been </p><p>recognized as the open standard that enables interoperability through its standardized data models and </p><p>communication services [4]. These data models and communication services are mapped to the </p><p>mainstream Ethernet technology, which has allowed IEC 61850 to be future proof regardless of the </p><p>advancements of communication technology [5]. </p><p>Realizing the benefits that can be exploited from the implementation of IEC 61850 standard, Tenaga </p><p>Nasional Berhad (TNB), a public electric utility company in Malaysia has recognized IEC 61850 as </p><p>the key enabler standard in the long term technology implementation plan which is called Technology </p><p>Road Map (TRM). TRM defines Smart and Intelligent Electricity Delivery System as TNBs own </p><p>definition of Smart Grid. The vision of TRM is to achieve the Smart and Intelligent Electricity </p><p>Delivery System by the year 2020, which smart substation based on IEC 61850 standard has been </p><p>identified as one of the major contributors for TNB to achieve the vision [6]. The overview of TNB </p><p>TRM is illustrated in Fig. 1 below. </p><p> Fig. 1. TNB Technology Roadmap Destinations and Enabling Technology </p><p>Under TRM, a cluster of technologies have been identified to achieve the vision of Smart and </p><p>Intelligent Electricity Delivery System by the year 2020. The vision is to develop smart substations </p><p>equipped with integrated Substation Protection, Automation and Control System (SPACS), which is </p><p>TNBs term for SAS. Realizing the capabilities and potential benefits of IEC 61850, the standard has </p><p>been identified as the key enabler standard and foundation for the technologies. Fig. 2 highlights the </p><p>cluster of technologies in TRM. </p></li><li><p> 4 </p><p> Fig. 2. Clusters of Technology under TRM with IEC 61850 Standard as the Enabler </p><p> With IEC 61850, TNB expects to achieve the following goals: </p><p>1. Integration of SPACS with IEDs from different vendors, or multi-vendor solution. This is to reduce the risk of common cause of failure and failure modes of IEDs from the same vendor </p><p>2. Standardized and self descriptive data models which explicitly defines the functions in power system domain. Such feature will simplify the engineering and configuration of SPACS. </p><p>3. Seamless exchange of information between multi-vendor devices using standardized communication services. </p><p>4. Vendor independent engineering and maintenance tools to ease the training and change management process of end users in maintaining SPACS. </p><p>To ensure that the above expectations are met, it is imperative for TNB to have the facility, tools and </p><p>procedure to: </p><p>1. Test IEC 61850 compliant devices and systems to ensure the functions are actually available and within the required performance criteria </p><p>2. Confirm the interoperability of the devices in utilizing IEC 61850 data models and communication services for information exchange </p><p>3. Identify and rectify potential issues before the devices are implemented in TNB system 4. Understand the specific implementation of IEC 61850 by vendors due to the open nature of the </p><p>standard </p><p>Hence, in July 2007, the Engineering Department of TNB Transmission Division has appointed </p><p>TNB Research Sdn Bhd (TNBR), a wholly owned subsidiary of TNB, to carry out a 3 year R&amp;D </p><p>program called Research and Development of Substation Automation System based on IEC 61850 </p><p>for Optimal Substation Design in TNB. As part of the research program deliverables, an in-house </p><p>research and testing laboratory which is the System Verification and Simulation (SVS) Laboratory has </p><p>been developed. The laboratory is equipped with IEC 61850 compliant IEDs and system which </p><p>simulates the communication of secondary equipment as per actual substation. The overview of the </p><p>SVS Laboratory is shown in Fig. 3. </p></li><li><p> 5 </p><p> Fig. 3. SVS Laboratory in TNB Research Sdn Bhd </p><p> The next section will discuss on the overall design, communication architecture and capabilities of </p><p>the SVS Laboratory. </p><p>2. TNB IEC 61850 System Verification and Simulation (SVS) Laboratory </p><p>SVS laboratory is designed to replicate a typical configuration of 132kV Air Insulated Substation </p><p>(AIS). The configuration follows a double bus-bar configuration with two over headline bays, one bus </p><p>coupler bay, two HV transformer bays and two MV transformer bays. Each bay is assigned with 2 </p><p>protection IEDs with duplicated functions of Main 1 and Main 2 together with 1 control IED. The </p><p>IEDs are connected to a dedicated Ethernet Switch for each bay using star topology through RJ45 </p><p>cables. The Ethernet Switches between bays are connected using fiber optic cables that form a ring </p><p>topology network. The ring topology provides n-1 redundancy of the network connection through the </p><p>Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol (RSTP). This configuration has allowed the SVS laboratory to emulate </p><p>IEC 61850 station bus communication architecture as in the actual substations. Fig. 4 illustrates the </p><p>physical communication architecture of the laboratory. </p><p> Fig. 4. Physical Communication Architecture for SVS Laboratory </p><p> While the physical communication architecture describes the physical connection between devices, </p><p>the information flow of the SVS laboratory is described by the logical communication architecture. </p><p>IEC 61850 services such as Manufacturer Messaging Specification (MMS) and Generic Object </p></li><li><p> 6 </p><p>Oriented Substation Event (GOOSE) are implemented for client-server and server-server </p><p>communication. Fig. 5 describes the logical communication architecture in SVS Laboratory. </p><p> Fig. 5. Logical Communication Architecture for SVS Laboratory </p><p>As shown in Fig. 5, IEDs in SVS laboratory are engineered and configured to exchange information </p><p>between each other in order to execute various substation functions. The detailed functions are </p><p>described in Table I. TABLE I </p><p>SUMMARY OF COMMUNICATION SERVICES AND INFORMATION FLOW IN SVS LABORATORY IN FIG. 5 </p><p>Symbol Descriptions </p><p> MMS message exchange between IEDs (server) and client applications </p><p> GOOSE (Trip &amp; blocking) message exchange between Protection IEDs within bay </p><p> GOOSE (Interlocking) message between protection IEDs to Control IED within bay </p><p> GOOSE message between one protection IED to another protection IED within the same bay or adjacent bay </p><p> GOOSE (Inter-trip) message between Transformer </p><p>HV protection IEDs and Transformer MV protection IED </p><p> GOOSE (Interlocking Live Transfer) message between Bus Coupler Control IED and rest of bay Control IED within same voltage level </p><p> IEC 60870-5-104 message exchange between Switchgear Simulator Remote Terminal Unit (RTU) </p><p>and Human Machine Interface (HMI) </p><p>To prove the interoperability using IEC 61850 standard, SVS laboratory applies the multi-vendor </p><p>concept where IEDs from 3 different vendors were installed and configured to communicate and </p><p>exchange information based on IEC 61850 data models and communication services as per described </p><p>in Table I. The IEDs were successfully configured and interoperability using IEC 61850 has been </p><p>achieved in SVS laboratory. The detailed information of the IEDs and other devices installed in the </p><p>SVS laboratory is described in Table II. </p></li><li><p> 7 </p><p>TABLE II </p><p>DEVICES IN SVS LAB </p><p>Equipment Manufacturer/ </p><p>Models </p><p>Protection IED Protection 1: NR-PCS 931, PCS 9611, PCS 978 </p><p>Protection 2 : GE Multilin-L90, F35, T60 </p><p>Control IED NR-PCS 9705 </p><p>Automatic Voltage regulator IED Maschinenfabrik Reinhausen (MR)-Tapcon 260 </p><p>Managed Ethernet Switch RuggedCom-RS 900 </p><p>Time Server Tekron TCG 02-E </p><p>Switchgear Simulator Xenon HMI server </p><p>Brodersen-RTU 232 with auxiliary relay contacts </p><p>Incontrol Tech-iTec 680 touch-screen based monitor </p><p>Secondary Testing Equipment Omicron-CMC 256plus with CMIRIG-B </p><p> The software applications that are used in the SVS laboratory are divided into two categories, which </p><p>are the proprietary or hardware based applications and independent applications. The list of software </p><p>applications is shown in Table III. TABLE III </p><p>SOFTWARE APPLICATIONS IN SVS LABORATORY </p><p>Proprietary software Independent software </p><p>IED configuration tools-PCS PC and Visual SCD for NARI IEDs and Enervista for GE Multilin IEDs. </p><p>Client-Server and peer to peer communication applications-Omicron IED Scout </p><p>Secondary testing application- Test Universe for Omicron 256plus </p><p>Third party IEC 61850 System Configuration Tool-HELINKS STS </p><p>Network Monitoring and Management-RuggedNMS for RuggedCom Ethernet switches </p><p>Network Protocol Analyzer-MMS Ethereal and Wireshark </p><p>HMI design-STRATON HMI Design Tool </p><p> As mentioned earlier, one of the main functions of the SVS laboratory is to serve as the platform to </p><p>test and verify IEC 61850 compliant devices before they are deployed in TNB system. This is </p><p>facilitated under TNB product acceptance process where the IEC 61850 features of a device, typically </p><p>IED, are meticulously tested and verified against TNB IEC 61850 requirement. The next section </p><p>elaborates the implementation of the product acceptance process and highlights some findings related </p><p>to interoperability during the tests. </p><p>3. TNB Product Acceptance Process </p><p>Starting from September 2013, the SVS laboratory has been utilized for TNB product acceptance </p><p>process for IEC 61850 compliant devices, which mostly are IEDs. The significance of having an </p><p>internal IEC 61850 product acceptance process is although most IEC 61850 compliant devices have </p><p>been tested at independent test laboratories, there is no guarantee that that the devices can interoperate </p><p>when assembled together in a system. This is mainly because the tests conducted at independent test </p><p>laboratories are IEC 61850 conformance tests, which focuses on the IEC 61850 functionalities of the </p><p>devices [7]. Hence, there is a need for TNB to establish a platform to be able to verify the </p><p>interoperability aspect of the devices before they are installed in actual substations. Using the existing </p><p>IEDs, communication network and testing tool in SVS laboratory, the test setup for the product </p><p>acceptance process is shown in Fig. 6. </p></li><li><p> 8 </p><p>Ethernet Switching Local Area Network</p><p>TIME SERVER</p><p>GPS</p><p>CLIENT </p><p>DEVICE UNDER TEST(DUT)</p><p>NETWORK ANALYSER</p><p>GOOSE SIMULATOR</p><p>SECONDARY INJECTION TEST </p><p>SET</p><p>SWITCHGEAR SIMULATOR</p><p>IED CONFIGURATION </p><p>TOOLS</p><p>SCL CHECKER</p><p>SCLFILES</p><p>CONFIG.FILES</p><p>SYSTEM CONFIGURATION </p><p>TO...</p></li></ul>

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