Teaching Spanish to Hispanic Students: Thematic Teaching Units

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    ED 410 764 FL 024 718

    AUTHOR Rodriguez Pino, CeciliaTITLE Teaching Spanish to Hispanic Students: Thematic Teaching

    Units for Middle School and High School Teachers.SPONS AGENCY National Endowment for the Humanities (NFAH), Washington,

    DCPUB DATE 1994-00-00NOTE 227p.; Contains light and broken type.PUB TYPE Guides Classroom Teacher (052)LANGUAGE SpanishEDRS PRICE MF01/PC10 Plus Postage.DESCRIPTORS *Careers; Class Activities; Course Content; Curriculum

    Design; *Family (Sociological Unit); Heritage Education;High School Students; Hispanic Americans; Immigrants;Instructional Materials; Intermediate Grades; MiddleSchools; *Native Language Instruction; Personal Narratives;Reading Materials; Secondary Education; Social Bias;*Spanish; *Stereotypes; Teaching Guides; *Thematic Approach;Units of Study

    IDENTIFIERS Hispanic American Students; Middle School Students

    ABSTRACTThe six thematic teaching units, designed for teaching

    Spanish to native speakers in the American Southwest, are a result of a July1993 conference of 30 middle school and high school teachers. Each unit wasproduced by a group of teachers, and is entirely or primarily in Spanish. Theunits contain lesson outlines, activities, tests, samples of student work,and readings. Unit topics include: family relationships; personal stories;the immigrant; careers; and prejudices and stereotypes. (MSE)

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    Reproductions supplied by EDRS are the best that can be madefrom the original document.

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  • TEACHING SPANISH TO HISPANIC STUDENTS

    THEMATIC TEACHING UNITS FORMIDDLE SCHOOL AND HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS

    "PERMISSION TO REPRODUCE THISMATERIAL HAS BEEN GRANTED BY

    e

    TO THE EDUCATIONALRESOURCES

    INFORMATION CENTER (ERIC)."

    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATIONOffice of Educational Research and Improvement

    EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES INFORMATIONtztoTCENTER (ERIC)

    his document has been reproduced asreceived from the person or organizationoriginating it.

    Minor changes have been made toimprove reproduction quality.

    Points of view or opinions stated in thisdocument do not necessarily representofficial OERI position or policy.

    Cecilia Rodriguez PinoProject funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities

    2

  • TEACHING SPANISH TO SOUTHWEST HISPANIC STUDENTS

    Thematic Units for Classroom Teachers

    A National Endowment for the Humanities Funded Project

    Cecilia Rodriguez Pino, Project Director

    New Mexico State UniversityLas Cruces, New Mexico

    A 1994 Publication

    BEST COPY. AVAILABLE

  • PREFACE

    This publication is part of the grant project 'Teaching Spanish to SouthwestHispanic Students" funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities to the

    project director, Cecilia Rodriguez Pino, New Mexico State University. This NEH

    project consisted of the following components:

    A five day conference was hosted by New Mexico State University

    in Las Cruces in July 1993 and was attended by thirty middle school

    and high school teachers with a minimum of three years experience,selected by application from the eight state region of the southwest

    to collaborate with eight consultants who presented information

    about pedagogical, linguistic, cultural and curricular topics related

    to the teaching of Spanish to Hispanic students at the middle school

    and secondary school level.

    A curriculum-development phrase was held during the summer conference

    to design thematic units outlines that the participating teachers woulddevelop throughout the academic year. The participants collaborated in

    groups to develop the six thematic units included in this publication.

    Many of the techniques and strategies presented by the eight consultants

    specifically for instruction for native speakers of Spanish wereincorporated into the teaching units.

    Throughout the 1993-94 academic year, the participating teachers

    have further developed their units, implemented the activities, several

    have evaluated them and asked for student feedback.

    It is hoped that these six units will serve as a model for teachers andadministrators and give an idea of the importance to develop curricula andinstructional materials that truly addresses the needs of the native speaking

    students, in particular, the maintenance and value of their heritage language and

    culture. Many of the activities, strategies and materials presented and/or designed

    at the *Teaching Spanish to Southwest Hispanic Students Conference' have not been

    explored sufficiently. The preparation of many instructional materials such as the

    ones found in these thematic units have not been published in Spanish for native

    speaker texts and merit much attention by the profession.

    The project director would like to thank the National Endowment for the

    Humanities for the valuable grant support provided to accomplish this endeavor to

    focus on the Spanish for Native Speakers profession.

    BEST COE'v AVAILABLE

  • The teachers who participated in the five day summer conference listed by state:

    ARIZONA:Julia Hernandez

    Colleen KaneJudith Kent

    Lucy Linder

    Pat Stewart

    CALIFORNIA:Peggy Blanton

    Esperanza Cobian

    Laura Nunez

    Rodolfo Orihuela

    Irene Silvas

    Sonia Stroessner

    Alicia Wilson

    NEW MEXICO:

    Felipe Avila

    Angela Ortiz Buckley

    Barbara Perez Casey

    Barbara Cottle

    Alicia Fletcher

    Eva Gallegos

    Gail Lamendola

    Martin Lueras

    Marta Moran

    Myrtelina Rael

    NEVADA:Gordon Hale

    Catherine Hammelrath

    TEXAS:Annette Guerra

    Viola Milan

    Stella Reyna

    Lupe Rosas

    Maria Zambrano

    South Mountain High SchoolArcadia High SchoolAmphitheater High SchoolNorth High School

    Miami High School

    Clovis West High SchoolSilver Creek High School

    Ray Kroc Middle School

    C. K. McClatchy High SchoolW. C. Overfelt High SchoolGunn High SchoolBuena High School

    Gadsden Middle School

    Sun land Park High School

    Goddard High SchoolHot Springs High SchoolSt. Pius High School

    Valley High School

    Pecos High School

    La Cueva High School

    Onate High School

    Mora High School

    Green Valley High School

    Las Vegas High School

    Clark High School

    San Jacinto Junior High SchoolHolmes High School

    Riverside High School

    John Marshall High School

    PhoenixPhoenixPhoenixPhoenixMiami

    ClovisSan JoseSan DiegoSacramentoSan JosePalo altoVentura

    AnthonySun land Park

    Roswell

    Truth or ConsequencesAlbuquerqueAlbuquerquePecosAlbuquerqueLas CrucesMora

    HendersonLas Vegas

    PlanoMidlandSan AntonioEl Paso

    San Antonio

  • Acknowledgements

    Appreciation and gratitude is expressed to the National Endowment for the

    Humanities, New Mexico State University, the Department of Languages and

    Linguistics and the Language Laboratory for their collaborative support to the

    Project Director.

    Special thanks to the conference keynote speaker, Dr. Richard Teschner of the

    University of Texas at El Paso.

    My most sincere thanks and admiration to the eight consultants who spent five days

    from eight to five and even late hours to collaborate and offer professional support

    to the participating teachers during the conference.

    Ricardo Aguilar

    George Blanco

    Ana Maria de BailingPatricia Morales Cano

    Nasario Garcia

    Fidel de Leon

    Barbara Merino

    Laura Gutierrez Spencer

    CONSULTANTS

    New Mexico State University

    University of Texas at AustinCupertino High School

    Western New Mexico UniversityHighlands University

    El Paso Community College

    University of California at DavisUniversity of Nevada/Las Vegas

    BEST COPY AVAIfl BLE

    Las CrucesAustin

    Santa Clara

    Silver CityLas Vegas, NMEl Paso, TX

    DavisLas Vegas

  • INVESTIGACION DE RAICES FAMILIARES

    Felipe Avila, New Mexico

    Esperanza Cobian, California

    Annette Guerra, Texas

    Catherine Hammelrath, Nevada

    Julia M. Hernandez, Arizona

    T COPY AVM BLE

  • INVESTIGACION DE RAICES FAMILIARES

    I. Introduccion

    A. Filosofia:

    El proposito de esta unidad es desarrollar el autoestima de losalumnos por medio del conocimiento de sus raices familiares, Losalumnos demostraran el dominio de la lengua espanola en forma oraly por escrito via la muestra de un proyecto a la clase y la

    presentaci6n de un resumen escrito. El Dr. Stephen Krashen proponeque el valor del autoestima reduce el socio-afectivo con relacion a

    la proficiencia oral.

    B. Justificaci6n:

    Meta:

    Los alumnos deben tener un buen concepto e imagen de si mismos parasobersalir academicamente al igual que socialmente.

    En esta unidad los alumnoshara.nunbUsqueda de sus raices familiaresatraves de entrevistas, un mapa geografico, una lista de costumbresfamiliares, y una investigaci6n sobre el nivel educativo de su grupo

    familiar. Los alumnos seran evaluados por medio de trabajos diariosy el resultado final de su proyecto. Este proyecto tomara 5 dias en

    una clase de 50 minutos.

  • Dia 1

    META: Los estudiantes prepararan una lista de terminos relacionados a lafamilia y podran definir las palabras desconocidas.

    MATERIALES: PapalLapizDiccionariosTiza

    VOCABULARIO ESENCIAL:

    los parientes provenir bisabuelo(a) tatarabuelos

    antepadados natal genealogia compadraz

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