Subsurface Storage Feasibility Study Status Report ... Subsurface Storage Feasibility Study Phase 1

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  • Subsurface Storage Feasibility Study Phase 1 Findings Fifteenmile Creek Watershed Council September 5, 2017

    Presenter Presentation Notes Reminder that this is the other half of the alternatives, not a replacement of the surface storage concept – stakeholders make decisions based on the set of alternatives

    Review concept Summarize Phase 1 Findings Communicate critical unknowns to be addressed in Phase 2 (if approved by Stakeholders)

    Introduction/Background Concept Refresher Project Tasks and Sequencing Findings

    Phase 1 Desktop Update and tailor common elements of surface storage study Evaluate physical feasibility - potential fatal flaws and opportunities Phase 2 – Field evaluation of concept

    This presentation is for Phase 1 – desktop fatal flaw evaluation

  • Subsurface Storage Concept

    Presenter Presentation Notes Divert groundwater from alluvial sediments in connection with stream Store in basalt aquifer(s) Withdraw stored water in summer for irrigation in exchange for senior users leasing water instream Locations where opportunity to exchange with senior water right holder, conditions suitable for diversion

  • Phase 1 • Update elements of surface storage study

    • Source water availability • Regulatory framework for diversion, storage and

    protection of water • Identify Fatal Flaws and Key Unknowns

    • Physical Feasibility • Cost-effective method for diverting and treating surface

    water • Suitable storage aquifer

    • Identify locations for Phase 2 testing

    Presenter Presentation Notes Regulatory Feasibility Water Availability Analysis Ecological Flow Analysis Update of Conservation Efficiency and Alternatives Means of Supplying Water Infrastructure Evaluation Physical Feasibility (Hydrogeologic Framework)

    DISCUSS Regulatory framework next.

  • Water Availability

    • OWRD Water Availability Report (base case) • 80% Exceedance – February and March • 50% Exceedance – January to March

    • Apparent worst case scenario indicates 1,921 AF (January and February) as determined in surface storage feasibility assessment

    • Storage Reservation (Fifteenmile Creek) • Water Available December – April

    Presenter Presentation Notes Water availability assessment is for 15Mile Creek above Jameson Canyon Indicates water available in December – April including Reservation

    Worst case scenario including SVF analysis 865 AF (281 MG) and 14.1 cfs (6330 gpm) in January 1,056 AF (344 MG) and 19 cfs (8528 gpm) in February

  • Water Availability

    Multi-Purpose Storage Reservation - Fifteenmile Creek

    • Up to 5,000 AF of water • Requested by ODA for multi-purpose storage

    project for future economic development • Allows water storage November – April • No reservation on Ramsey Creek • Expect OWRD to require a surface water right to

    access reservation (rather than groundwater right) • March-April critical steelhead migration – ODFW

    consultation

    Presenter Presentation Notes Use must be consistent with purposes for which ODA requested reservation

  • Permitting Framework Option #1 – ASR Project with a New Water Right and a Limited License for ASR Testing

    • New irrigation water right to authorize ASR and the use of stored water for irrigation (plus limited license)

    • Sources: Fifteenmile Creek below Ramsey Creek, and Ramsey Creek

    • Storage season: Feb. & March without reservation

    • Water quality: drinking water quality standard

    • Transfer existing irrigation water rights instream

    Presenter Presentation Notes Initial instream transfers expected to be time-limited. Confirm no additional impacts to existing junior water rights as a result

  • Water Availability

    • Ecological Flow Analysis • Seasonally Varying Flow (SVF) Method preferred by ODFW • OWRD = Funding Agency • SVF Method based on Optimum Flows and no withdrawals in

    March & April • Optimum Flows require more water than Instream Water

    Rights • ODFW has applied for additional Instream Water Rights • ODFW input required

    Presenter Presentation Notes DIFFERENCE IS DIVERSION(s) AT/BELOW CONFLUENCE WITH RAMSEY CREEK

    OWRD updating and taking into account diversion (change) Idea of variability

    What the Bullets on Slide Mean:

    One requirement for determining Water Availability is accounting for the SVF. The SVF method considers instream needs that are based on optimum flows which come from Basin Investigation Reports done in the 60s and 70s. The funding agency, OWRD requires this analysis. These optimum flows require more water then the instream water rights. Additionally, for the Aboveground Study, ODFW did not want withdrawals in March & April in order to provide flushing flows for channel maintenance and juvenile outmigration. Another current development is that ODFW has applied for water rights which require higher flows in Fifteenmile. The optimum flow values may change based on the new water rights. Currently we are coordinating with ODFW to determine any adjustments to the SVF Method, instream flows required, and whether withdrawals can be made in March and April.

  • Permitting Framework

    Option #2 – AR Project with a New Water Right and New “Secondary” Right for Irrigation

    • New water right for AR purposes • Source: Fifteenmile Creek below Ramsey Creek; Ramsey

    Creek

    • Storage season: Jan. to March without reservation

    • Water quality: Anti-degradation standard

    • New water right to use stored water for irrigation

    • Protect existing irrigation water rights instream

  • Permitting Framework

    Other Considerations

    • Limits on amount of water available to store • Potential constraints/conditions to use the Storage

    Reservation

    • Potential constraints imposed by ODFW/DEQ comments • Protection of water left instream

    Presenter Presentation Notes

    Whether a time-limited transfer “severs” the existing water rights so that a new irrigation right can be issued

    NEED WRAP UP FOR REGULATORY SECTION

  • Conservation and Alternatives Evaluation • Irrigation System Improvements

    • 77 acre-feet per year • $5,965 per acre-foot

    • Conveyance System Improvements • 227 acre-feet per year • $7,280 per acre-foot

    Presenter Presentation Notes The estimated costs from the 2015 Aboveground Study were inflated at 5% for 2 years to correspond with the 2017 Belowground Study.

    Irrigation system improvements can be implemented and would conserve 77 ac-ft of water per year at a cost of $5,965 per ac-ft.

    Conveyance system improvements can be implemented and would conserve 227 ac-ft of water per year at a cost of $7,280 per ac-ft.

  • Preliminary Environmental Assessment

    • Potential impacts to Designated Farmland • Must follow Federal and County requirements

    • Portions of Fifteenmile Creek designated as a Wild and Scenic River

    • Potential for more strict State and Federal regulations • Compliance with floodplain requirements

    • Potentially subject to Executive Order 11988 – Floodplain Management

    Presenter Presentation Notes Relevant Sections From 9/1/17 email from Dan Molini Zoning: The Wasco County Zoning Code identifies both of the potential water storage locations as A-1 Exclusive Farm Use (EFU zone). A Land Use Compatibility Statement (LUCS) and Conditional Use Permit (CUP) from Wasco County may be required to complete this project.

    Farmland: If this project is completed by a federal agency or with assistance from a federal agency, the action area may be subject to review under the Farmland Protection Policy Act (FPPA). If this project would result in the permanent conversion of farmland and would need to be approved by Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS).

    Wild and Scenic Rivers: Portions of Fifteenmile Creek are classified as wild and scenic. The project cannot impact flows in a wild and scenic river and would need to be designed to meet state and federal regulations regarding their protection.

    Floodplain: Portions of Fifteenmile Creek are located in Zone A, the 100-year flood zone. This project will need to comply with floodplain regulations. If this project is completed by a federal agency or with assistance from a federal agency, the action area may be subject to Executive Order 11988 Floodplain Management.

  • Preliminary Environmental Assessment

    • Wetlands exist within Fifteenmile Creek watershed • May require surveys, reports, and permits

    • Potential need for a Cultural Resources Inventory • Designated critical habitat for steelhead salmon

    • Restricts in-water work window per ODFW • Permits and environmental documents required

    • Critical habitat for listed terrestrial wildlife species • Must evaluate impacts of any development

    Presenter Presentation Notes Relevant Sections From 9/1/17 email from Dan Molini Wetlands/Waterbodies: Numerous small wetlands are mapped on the National Wetlands Inventory mapper in the Fifteenmile Creek watershed, mainly associated with waterways. If there is potential for the project to impact wetlands, a Wetland Survey should be conducted and a Wetland Delineation Report prepared and submitted