School Gardening: Roots We Eat

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    01-Jun-2017

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<ul><li><p>Les</p><p>son</p><p> tim</p><p>e: s</p><p>ee a</p><p>dd</p><p>itio</p><p>nal</p><p> tim</p><p>eV</p><p>ocab</p><p>ula</p><p>ry: </p><p>beet</p><p>, car</p><p>rot,</p><p> rad</p><p>ish</p><p>, par</p><p>snip</p><p>, sw</p><p>eet </p><p>pot</p><p>ato,</p><p> ru</p><p>taba</p><p>ga, j</p><p>eru</p><p>sale</p><p>m arti</p><p>choke, turnip roots we eat</p><p>Learning ObjectivesAt the end of this lesson, students will be able to define a root vegetable and name and describe four kinds of roots that we eat. Students will learn how to harvest root vegetables from the garden.</p><p>Materials A variety of root vegetables (beets, radishes, carrots, potatos, sweet potatoes, turnips, etc.), enough for all students to taste, as well as at least one of each vegetable to leave whole or use Illustrations 1F3a and 1F3b if there are limited root vegetables in the garden.Root vegetables in the school garden that are ready to harvest.Optional: Gardening tools needed to harvest root vegetables.</p><p>PreparationOptional: Recruit and train volunteers to prepare the garden, prepare the samples, and assist in harvesting and serving samples.Prepare the garden. Find root vegetables in the school garden that are ready to harvest. Make arrangements with the school cafeteria (or other recipients) to receive the harvest. Prepare garden tools if needed.Prepare root vegetables for sampling. Following safe food-handling guidelines, cook or wash and slice vegetables, as appropriate for the vegetable.</p><p>Introducing the LessonActivate prior information. If you completed 1st Grade Fall Lesson 2, Getting to the Roots, remind students what they learned about the roots of plants in general and about edible roots. Specifically: Roots absorb water and nutrients from soil, store food, hold the plant up, and anchor the plant in the ground so that it does not blow over in the wind. Carrots are one kind of root that we eat. They are a taproot that stores food for the plant, and for people and animals to eat.</p><p>additional time: 2 hours. Time can be divided into 1 hour on two different days</p><p>Big IdeaPeople get food from nature.</p><p>Guiding QuestionWhat parts of plants can we eat?</p><p>DescriptionStudents learn about a variety of edible root vegetables, then harvest </p><p>root vegetables from the school garden to share with the school (or other) community. </p><p>faLL . 3</p><p>fir</p><p>st</p><p> gr</p><p>ad</p><p>e</p></li><li><p>Les</p><p>son</p><p> tim</p><p>e: s</p><p>ee a</p><p>dd</p><p>itio</p><p>nal</p><p> tim</p><p>eV</p><p>ocab</p><p>ula</p><p>ry: </p><p>beet</p><p>, car</p><p>rot,</p><p> rad</p><p>ish</p><p>, par</p><p>snip</p><p>, sw</p><p>eet </p><p>pot</p><p>ato,</p><p> ru</p><p>taba</p><p>ga, j</p><p>eru</p><p>sale</p><p>m arti</p><p>choke, turnip roots we eat</p><p>Procedure1. Introduce root vegetables. After activating students prior knowledge, help them to understand that, as a group, roots we eat are called root vegetables. Like carrots, they all are taproots that store food. The plant uses some of the food to grow, and when the plant is done growing, people and animals can also use the roots for food.</p><p>2. Name and sample root vegetables. Show the students the examples of root vegetables that you left whole. As you introduce each vegetable, write its name for students and offer them a taste of the vegetable. Have students dictate a description of the vegetable as they taste it. This section can be done with a few root vegetables or many.</p><p>3. Prepare to harvest. After tasting is complete, or on a different day, remind students that root vegetables all come from plants, and that they can help harvest one root vegetable to share with the rest of the school (or whatever group in the community receives the schools vegetables). Tell students about the vegetables that theyll be harvesting, and remind them of the garden rules.</p><p>4. Harvest root vegetables. Go to the garden. Show students how to harvest the root vegetable that is ready. (Provide garden tools and supervise students in their use, if necessary.) Harvest and rinse vegetables, and deliver them to the school cafeteria (or set aside for another group). Clean up and return to the classroom.</p><p>Assessing Student KnowledgeAssess students ability to harvest root vegetables by observing them as they do so. Help them overcome any difficulties they may have. </p><p>Informally assess students understanding and recall of root vegetables in a class discussion after returning from the garden. Ask questions such as these: What foods did we taste today? What did they taste like? Where did these foods grow? What part of the plant are they? Make a list of edible root vegetables.</p><p>ExtensionsHelp students plant root vegetables in clear containers to observe their growth in the classroom. </p><p>Books &amp; ResourcesCarrots Grow Underground, by Mari C. Schuh (Capstone Press, 2011)</p><p>faLL . 3</p><p>fir</p><p>st</p><p> gr</p><p>ad</p><p>eOR. Dept. of Ed. Key Standards </p><p>Oregon Science Content Standards:1.1L.1 Compare and contrast characteristics amongCompare and contrast characteristics among </p><p>individuals within one plant or animal group.</p><p>Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts:1.SL.4 Describe people, places, things, and events with relevant details, </p><p>expressing ideas and feelings clearly.</p><p>Oregon Social Studies Academic Content Standards:1.12 Give examples of local natural resources and describe howGive examples of local natural resources and describe how </p><p>people use them. </p></li><li><p>1F3a</p></li><li><p>1F3b</p></li></ul>